Translation of whale in Spanish:

whale

ballena, n.

Pronunciation /(h)weɪl/ /weɪl/

See Spanish definition of ballena

nounplural whales, plural whale

Zoology
  • 1

    ballena feminine
    • Marine mammals include narwhals, beluga whales, walrus, and ringed and bearded seals.
    • Come face to face with polar bears, walruses, harbour seals and beluga whales.
    • Sea lions, harbor seals, sea otters, porpoise and whales are common around the islands.
    • We saw minke whales, hump backed whales, bald eagles, puffins and moose.
    • Fur seals, elephant seals, and the great whales were all hunted to the brink of extinction.
    • Up until quite recently we had no idea of the numbers and variety of the whales, dolphins and porpoises round our coast.
    • Orkney folk are being urged to keep a look out for whales, dolphins and porpoises this weekend.
    • We were told that whale sharks, whales and dolphins are abundant during the summer, between November and April.
    • By the Miocene, whales of both lineages are relatively common fossils in many marine deposits.
    • Acoustical energy generated by the bodies of whales or large schools of fish can be lower still.
    • Dugongs are one of those sea creatures like porpoises and whales which should be completely protected by law.
    • These whales have been hunted to near extinction, and only about 2,500 exist today.
    • However, paleontology as a whole encompasses all life, from bacteria to whales.
    • How many harbours play host to everything from seahorses and frogfish to whales and dolphins?
    • It is our hope and prayer that the humpback and other whales will be protected in the West Indies and other parts of the world.
    • They follow the breaking edge of the summer ice to hunt for seals, and are even known to attack beluga whales in the water.
    • Laboratory examinations of the heads of the whales showed trauma induced by sound.
    • Scientists believe that now fewer than a hundred of the whales ply the waters near Alaska.
    • As many as four generations of whales live together in some of these matrilineal groups.