Definition of angst in English:

angst

noun

mass noun
  • 1A feeling of deep anxiety or dread, typically an unfocused one about the human condition or the state of the world in general.

    ‘the existential angst of the middle classes’
    ‘rock and pop have a tradition of celebrating adolescent angst’
    • ‘Everything bounces along with a youthful joy, devoid of cynical teenage angst, full of hope and dare we say it slightly soppy.’
    • ‘It is a sign of the times, of our tumultuous, dizzying culture of metaphysical angst.’
    • ‘Through an occasional nocturnal trip to the gym, Matt Murdock finds a way to relieve some of his adolescent angst.’
    • ‘It didn't seem so, and the approach of my 40th birthday induced a bout of full - blown midlife angst.’
    • ‘It involves a lack of motivation, a destruction of self belief, a general feeling of angst.’
    • ‘The audience is propelled into the existential angst of everyday living.’
    • ‘The sense of angst and melancholy conveyed by Lumley, with the aid of director Hugo Blick, is strangely appealing.’
    • ‘What makes these songs so potent is the unmistakable angst festering beneath each one.’
    • ‘The summer that is now nearly officially behind us has been all about a kind of existential angst for me.’
    • ‘Still, few could have predicted he'd fall this deep into a pit of lyrical self-pity and teen angst.’
    • ‘Racism first manifests itself among the group as a form of verbal violence, an expression of general angst.’
    • ‘On the creative front: I'm asking myself about how and why one can derive creativity from angst or annoyance.’
    • ‘I think there is a human dilemma, human pain and angst, and that it is very universal.’
    • ‘At the root of the crisis is a deep angst over the dire state of domestic and European economic affairs.’
    • ‘Many of the works that appear in the show depict the angst of the present generation.’
    • ‘Teenage clubs would be formed in schools to tackle teenage angst and improve leadership qualities.’
    • ‘If there is angst, it is a human condition rather than a disorder specific to the urban, displaced elite.’
    • ‘Is it just a deeper than normal journey into adolescent angst or a modern fairy tale?’
    • ‘Each of us have tremendous angst and shame and heartache about our eating disorders on the show.’
    • ‘The twin evils of terrorism and teenage angst drove her to bulimia, a condition she tackled only a year back.’
    anxiety, fear, dread, apprehension, worry, perturbation, foreboding, trepidation, malaise, distress, disquiet, disquietude, unease, uneasiness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal A feeling of persistent worry about something trivial.
      ‘my hair causes me angst’
      • ‘Finally, however, after much worry and angst, it was the night of the Debutante Ball.’
      • ‘When I was a child I used to cause my mother major fits of angst while trying to keep me still in church.’
      • ‘We wouldn't have minded, but she put all our cutlery and crockery away in the wrong places, causing much angst upon our return.’
      • ‘Mortgage angst hits commodities’
      • ‘Often, their answers only lead to more questions, hence my interpretational angst.’
      • ‘Judging from the press releases that clog my e-mail, there seems to be an upsurge in financial angst among twenty-somethings.’

Origin

1920s from German, ‘fear’.

Pronunciation

angst

/aŋst/