Main definitions of bandy in English

: bandy1bandy2bandy3

bandy1

(also bandy-legged)

adjectivebandier, bandiest

  • 1(of a person's legs) curved outwards so that the knees are wide apart.

    ‘she had bent, slightly bandy legs’
    • ‘Back then, the pale, scrawny 14-year-old with bandy legs and crooked teeth was as far removed from the healthy, sporty look epitomised by Cindy Crawford and Elle MacPherson as you could get.’
    • ‘His hips and his bandy legs, which seem unusually long from knee to ankle, move with a stiffness which suggests that his joints are about to seize up.’
    • ‘He's a skinny little hillbilly Jesus with bandy legs and close-set eyes and a clever, foxy face.’
    • ‘The things didn't look dangerous with their soft, bandy legs and large fingers.’
    • ‘It might be their posture, a cocksure expression, bandy legs and butter-hued dentition, or nothing at all.’
    • ‘In other words, he was a wee slip of a thing, a flyweight who sometimes had the additional curse of bandy legs caused by childhood rickets, a dreadful disease usually caused by a lack of vitamin D.’
    • ‘The shark is circling Farnsworth, you of the bandy legs and discombobulated dance maneuverings.’
    • ‘A few mums and grannies in leather skirts go up to the stage to try dancing around the pole - bending bandy legs, flicking ankles and pouting.’
    • ‘She frightened the hell out of the entire male staff with her rampaging sexual prowess and bandy legs.’
    • ‘With his peroxide head bowed, eyes closed, the old man feels his way forward, bandy legs shuffling, shoulders stooped, senses bat sharp, as keen as razor wire.’
    • ‘The Instructor was tanned, bored, had bandy legs, roamed around saying nothing and then wrote his name in big letters on the board.’
    • ‘His bandy legs are pulled up under the distended moon of his swollen stomach.’
    • ‘He yanked his robe up to his waist and raced on naked bandy legs to the stone rostrum at the east of the forum.’
    • ‘Takeshi is small, thick set, with bandy legs and a disconcerting twitch to his cheek.’
    • ‘Little Evie, two generations distant, is doing fine, pushing herself up on back legs still bandy, only to have them shoot out behind her.’
    • ‘She thinks her own legs are small, bandy, nearly misshapen.’
    • ‘She has been running from the Ohio bigwigs implicated in the scandal as fast as her bandy little legs will carry her.’
    • ‘His legs, bandy and stubby, propel him sheathed in black overalls.’
    bowed, curved, bent, crooked, misshapen, malformed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a person) having bandy legs.
      ‘he was short, bandy, and obese’
      • ‘But come showtime it'll be buzzing and Sylla, as he ambles towards me on the pitchside track, cuts an impressive (if slightly bandy - legged) figure.’
      • ‘I'm all stiff and bandy legged, like a pensioner.’
      • ‘With his cane, his downcast eyes, and bandy legged gait, he is the antithesis of Hollywood muscle-bound steroid cases.’
      bowed, curved, bent, crooked, misshapen, malformed
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century perhaps from obsolete bandy ‘curved stick used in hockey’.

Pronunciation

bandy

/ˈbandi/

Main definitions of bandy in English

: bandy1bandy2bandy3

bandy2

verbbandies, bandying, bandied

[with object]usually be bandied about/around
  • Pass on or discuss (an idea or rumour) in a casual or uninformed way.

    ‘£40,000 is the figure that has been bandied about’
    • ‘Such ideas have been bandied about for decades, even before the first oil boom of the 1970s.’
    • ‘Internet broadcasting was one of the big ideas bandied around during the dot-com boom in the late 1990s.’
    • ‘National's Maori member has earned the opportunity to at least be associated with the rumours that are being bandied around this House in relation to the leadership change.’
    • ‘According to police, the idea has been bandied around since Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir John Stevens saw the scheme in operation in Holland.’
    • ‘Over the past couple of weeks many expert ideas have been bandied around connected with Sri Lanka's dismal showing in South Africa.’
    • ‘The idea was bandied around and apparently dropped.’
    • ‘One idea which has been bandied around recently is some kind of election before anointing Prince Charles.’
    • ‘Incivilities were bandied about and spread to the government.’
    • ‘The idea of positive sentence management has been bandied about for many years.’
    • ‘They are making a mockery of RTE by getting free publicity by way of having their name bandied about on a current affairs program.’
    • ‘Ways to reform the annuity system have also been bandied about, such as allowing people to pass on some their pension pot to their descendants.’
    • ‘The idea of a fifth full-sized holiday village has been bandied about for some time.’
    • ‘Valuations of around $80 million are being bandied around which, if true, would suggest Morgan should perhaps be on the Crikey Revised Wealth list.’
    • ‘Electro's been very much bandied around in magazines and newspapers and stuff lately.’
    • ‘There's been a few names bandied around and I hope there can be a few more signings before the end of the transfer window.’
    • ‘The word ‘great’ gets bandied around a lot, but it sure applies to CBS's ‘60 Minutes.’’
    • ‘But they have received little recognition or reward: their intellectual property has been stolen and bandied around the world, often appearing, uncredited, in the national media.’
    • ‘The compensation figures being bandied around, in our view, are far too high.’
    • ‘In England the same debates are being had, reforms are focusing on the same areas and the catchphrases of ‘freedom’ and ‘choice’ are also being bandied around.’
    • ‘She was very secretive in the sense that she didn't want her name bandied around the village.’
    spread, spread about, spread around, put about, toss about, discuss, rumour
    View synonyms

Phrases

    bandy words
    • Argue pointlessly or rudely.

      ‘I'm not going to bandy words with you’
      • ‘Do not bandy words in your insolence with the Mouth of Sauron!’
      • ‘Tired of bandying words with this charlatan, I allow my fury to seep into my eyes.’
      • ‘Unable to bandy words any longer, he took the phone away from his ear and hit the ‘end’ button, then placed the phone carefully back in its cradle on the desk.’
      • ‘Afraid it was Dan, back to bandy words once more, she whirled suddenly.’
      • ‘Meantime, while academicians bandied words, many applied politicians saw Cannan's Law clearly, and used it to further their ends.’

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘pass a ball to and fro’): perhaps from French bander ‘take sides at tennis’, from bande ‘band, crowd’ (see band).

Pronunciation

bandy

/ˈbandi/

Main definitions of bandy in English

: bandy1bandy2bandy3

bandy3

noun

mass noun
  • 1A game similar to field hockey or ice hockey, played with a ball and large curved sticks.

    1. 1.1count noun The curved stick used in the game of bandy.

Origin

Late 17th century perhaps from bandy.

Pronunciation

bandy

/ˈbandi/