Definition of bedfellow in English:

bedfellow

noun

  • 1A person who shares a bed with another.

    • ‘The way men perceive the educational status of their female bedfellows has changed.’
    • ‘For them, strange or strained bedfellows are more fun than no bedfellows at all, since the excitement is all in the conquest.’
    • ‘It appears they were bedfellows both figuratively and literally.’
    • ‘They will keep out the growling, rasping or fluty snoring sounds from the ears of bedfellows and allow them to sleep peacefully.’
    1. 1.1A person or thing allied or closely connected with another.
      ‘big business and politics were inseparable bedfellows’
      • ‘Plus, world politics makes for strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘In this context, politics created strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘History takes strange turns and politics makes strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘Heritage and recent history are strange bedfellows in today's political establishment.’
      • ‘Politics sometimes really does make for strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘Politics and network television programming make strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘Do tourism and religion make strange bedfellows?’
      • ‘Industry and the environment are often seen as strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘But at the last minute, I went with my own thoughts and voted no, in spite of joining such strange bedfellows by so doing.’
      • ‘Music and cartoons might seem like strange bedfellows to most.’
      • ‘Campaigns like this can attract some strange bedfellows.’
      • ‘Let me live in my dream world where strange bedfellows become welcome friends.’
      • ‘Art and war may seem strange bedfellows, but often the needs of the one are answered by the other.’
      • ‘Lenders will soon have a bedfellow to share their disturbing secrets.’
      • ‘Music and performance art can be awkward bedfellows.’
      • ‘Chaos and desperation became familiar bedfellows.’
      • ‘Good storytelling and allegory make uncomfortable bedfellows.’
      • ‘In general, violence and romance are uneasy bedfellows.’
      • ‘History and Hollywood have always been uneasy bedfellows.’
      • ‘But there are important ways in which liberty and equality are natural bedfellows.’

Pronunciation

bedfellow

/ˈbɛdfɛləʊ/