Definition of blind in English:

blind

Pronunciation /blīnd/ /blaɪnd/

Translate blind into Spanish

adjective

  • 1Unable to see because of injury, disease, or a congenital condition.

    ‘a blind man with a stick’
    • ‘he was blind in one eye’
    • ‘she suffered from glaucoma, which has left her completely blind’
    • ‘she suffered from glaucoma, which has left her completely blind’
    • ‘Two years ago, MS patient Natasha Bagan lost her ability to walk and was almost blind after her condition rapidly deteriorated.’
    • ‘Jurors heard that Mr Ward, who suffered from a rare eye condition and had been blind since he was 15, had been celebrating his birthday.’
    • ‘I had a little Chihuahua named Carlos that had some kind of skin disease and was totally blind.’
    • ‘Aslam will soon be operated on, just like Tajul Islam, who was born blind due to bilateral congenital cataract.’
    • ‘Indeed, as I interviewed him I would go out of my way to point out to him that the tape recorder was running, lest he forget and, being blind, be unable to see the red recording light.’
    • ‘Joe Hart, defending, said that in 2002, while serving a prison sentence, Grady contracted a degenerative eye disease and is now blind.’
    • ‘Just under a quarter of the children met the criteria for severe disability, which included being unable to walk without help, unable to feed themselves, being blind, or being unable to talk.’
    • ‘This actually happens in the case of individuals who are born blind due to congenital cataracts and are subsequently cured.’
    • ‘He was expected to be blind, deaf, unable to speak, and quadriplegic.’
    • ‘Yvonne Sleightholme was arrested soon afterwards, but before she could be brought to trial she went blind - a condition referred to in those days as hysterical blindness.’
    • ‘Mr Carter meanwhile was in the intensive care unit of the city's American hospital, where doctors refused to say whether his injuries might leave him blind.’
    • ‘There are an estimated 146 million people who currently require treatment for the disease who may go blind if nothing is done.’
    • ‘A pedestrian crossing in Church Street has been broken for weeks leaving blind shoppers unable to gauge when to cross the busy road.’
    • ‘I fell down into the sand, blind and unable to see what I was doing.’
    • ‘I left academia because I was frustrated having so many patients go blind from these terrible diseases.’
    • ‘She knows she is going blind from a hereditary disease and yet won't tell anyone, or ease up.’
    • ‘One-year-old Eva Heeks contracted meningitis soon after birth, leaving her blind, deaf and unable to walk, talk or feed properly.’
    • ‘In China, more than 9.4 million men and women over 40 years of age suffer from the disease, 55 per cent of whom are blind in at least one eye.’
    • ‘By this time Lady Mills was wheelchair-bound and suffering from Alzheimer's disease, and Sir John had gone almost blind after retinas in both eyes had failed..’
    • ‘The club, based in Tottington, was founded by Derek Pritchard, 64, who is almost totally blind because of a hereditary eye condition.’
    visually impaired, unsighted, sightless, visionless, unseeing, stone blind, eyeless
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1attributive (of an action, especially a test or experiment) done without being able to see or without being in possession of certain information.
      ‘a blind tasting of eight wines’
      • ‘The test will be a blind exam so applicants cannot memorise the answers but the Government is publishing a handbook guide to the areas being tested.’
      • ‘The skates did feel slightly lighter, but I'm convinced that was only placebo effect - I bet that I'd not be able to tell the difference in a blind test.’
      • ‘In a blind test last week, nine out of 12 shoppers said they preferred the taste of a £1.45 loaf from Safeway to Poilâne's finest sourdough.’
      • ‘When scientists criticize these ideas, they often start talking about blind tests and repeatability and so forth.’
      • ‘Twice then - by the original expert and by three of the four analysts in the blind test - doubts had been cast over whether the print was McKie's.’
      • ‘So can world experts tell a red from a white in a blind test?’
      • ‘In a blind test, conducted by the Consumer Contact Agency, Sports Mixture was voted the favourite hard gum in the UK.’
      • ‘Reports have suggested that only a small proportion of those who claimed to suffer from wheat intolerance showed any symptoms in blind tests.’
      • ‘This was all very friendly, fun and instructive, and we bought a small bottle of balsamic vinegar (the one we liked best in the blind test) to take home.’
      • ‘Science journal Nature chose 50 science articles from both Encyclopedia Britanica and gave peer reviewers a blind test to find mistakes.’
      • ‘For example, it would predict that women would suffer subjective biases in blind experiments where people are asked to judge work by men and women.’
      • ‘Only after passing three blind tasting tests and 12 months' bottle ageing are the wines released.’
      • ‘In other research some experienced wine drinkers in a blind test were unable to tell a red from a white.’
      • ‘Robbie Williams and Melinda Messenger are among the top names who have donated items for our blind charity auction in aid of tsunami victims.’
      • ‘The subjects received three consecutive weeks each of MPH and placebo in random order and under blind conditions.’
      • ‘Unlike Bierut, he advocated the adaptation of Marxism-Leninism to Polish conditions rather than the blind implementation of Stalinism.’
      • ‘Deutsche's own auction was blind, with bidders unable to see other bids.’
      • ‘Results of such blind split sampling are shown in Table 3.’
      • ‘It doesn't require any blind groping to find hidden body parts.’
      • ‘If you are playing blind you do not look at your cards, but leave them face down on the table.’
    2. 1.2Aeronautics (of flying) using instruments only.
      ‘blind landings during foggy conditions’
      • ‘The Lorenz beam system for blind landing consisted of two transmitters located on opposite sides of the airstrip runway.’
      • ‘From this point on, they'd be practically flying blind, with only the occasional glimpse of their surroundings.’
      • ‘This could be nerve-racking for the pilot while the copilot made blind takeoffs.’
      • ‘She almost laughed in amazement; the pilot was flying blind - they didn't have a single light on!’
      • ‘Since the aircraft's stormscope was not working, the pilot was flying blind into the thunderstorm, and as a result, he and his three passengers died.’
  • 2predicative Lacking perception, awareness, or discernment.

    ‘she was blind to the realities of her position’
    • ‘he's absolutely blind where you're concerned, isn't he?’
    • ‘The enemy had been left virtually blind in the area of the English Channel and were unable to mount a naval challenge that could have thwarted the invasion.’
    • ‘By having the opportunity to see what the best of the best look like, and how they practice and perform, it's hard to be barn blind.’
    • ‘I never really noticed how much she had changed, but I guess I was just blind.’
    • ‘Nature is blind, and whether we use it for good or ill depends on us and human nature.’
    • ‘Look at his robe there, the man's blind with rut.’
    • ‘A noble, obdurate of his usual code of conduct, stumbled in a panic fuelled frenzy of blind groping and misplaced steps.’
    • ‘He was not blind: he realised dynamite could be used for uncivil purposes as well as civil ones but he thought armed deterrence could be more effective in maintaining peace than disarmament.’
    • ‘She was blind and deaf to every other sight and sound aside from the swirling patterns.’
    • ‘To these and other phenomena we remained blind - until we began opening windows to other octaves in the electromagnetic spectrum.’
    • ‘Let the politicians who are so blind as to be unable to see beyond their noses give John and Josephine Citizen just a little bit of credit for our common sense values.’
    • ‘Human beings become spiritually blind when they are unable to grasp the ‘other world’ within this world.’
    • ‘This time, it is ITV who have proved, once again, that they are so blind as to be unable to see the big picture, even when it is overwhelming and staring them right in the face.’
    • ‘They had some good points but they were still blind in some areas, unable to see truth.’
    • ‘It causes them to be ‘time blind’, unable to think about themselves across time.’
    • ‘Why did all the leaders have to be so damned blind?’
    • ‘The visa revocation process remains partially blind and needlessly porous to incursions by individuals who might pose a grave risk to our security.’
    • ‘Our government and politicians are blind and deaf on this issue.’
    • ‘Granted, the responsibility of not getting hit falls with the driver too — and it seems like so many people are blind behind the wheel as it is with cell phones, distractions, etc.’
    imperceptive, unperceptive, slow, obtuse, stupid, uncomprehending, unimaginative, insensitive, thick-skinned, bovine, stolid, unintelligent
    unmindful of, mindless of, careless of, heedless of, oblivious to, insensible to, unconcerned about, unconcerned by, inattentive to, indifferent to
    uncritical, unreasoned, unthinking, unconsidered, mindless, injudicious, undiscerning, indiscriminate
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1attributive (of an action or state of mind) not controlled by reason or judgment.
      ‘they left in blind panic’
      • ‘There's another reason why blind devotion to rules won't do.’
      • ‘All I wanted to do was to survive and really was driven by blind hope than by reason.’
      • ‘True, you could have fully murdered him, but the only reason you hurt him enough to get away was blind panic.’
      • ‘When a horse is in a blind panic it loses all sense of reason.’
      • ‘The reason for the blind loyalty: The Tigers have no one behind Cox.’
      • ‘Siddhartha finally allows human emotion to control him through his blind love for Young Siddhartha.’
      • ‘This is time to rally around the flag of reason, not of blind retribution.’
      • ‘By far the worst feature of this election result is the blind surrender of control of the Senate to the Liberals and Family First.’
      • ‘The ethical dimension of love consists in the challenge its blind urgency presents to reason.’
      • ‘It could be avoided only when a mother let herself be guided by nature and reason instead of blind love.’
      • ‘I heard her laugh at me, which made my blind hate take control over all of my senses.’
      • ‘Sanjay is also the voice of reason in a community that has been conditioned by blind faith.’
      • ‘Some true believers on one side have been unable to free themselves from a sense of blind loyalty to the past, ill-founded as it is in whole or in part.’
      • ‘You do not know that without you and your blind indifference, such misleaders could not carry out deeds that damn us all, as much as they shame themselves.’
      • ‘The world can no longer afford the blind suspicion, destructive rivalries and indifference to the legitimate fears of others that have brought it to this state.’
      • ‘Toby jumped off the couch in a blind fury and launched something at her wall.’
      • ‘Yet again she refused, and this time the mage threw open the door to her room in a blind rage.’
      • ‘Fortunately even the drink didn't hinder his ability to conceal his anger; his cold, blind wrath.’
      • ‘Though perhaps I know something about blind maternal love.’
      impetuous, impulsive, rash, hasty, reckless, uncontrolled, uncontrollable, uninhibited, unrestrained, immoderate, intemperate, wild, unruly, irrational, frantic, violent, furious, unbridled, uncurbed, unchecked, unrepressed
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2attributive Not governed by purpose.
      ‘moving purposelessly in a world of blind chance’
      • ‘There is no way that every organism could have been created by blind chance, they say.’
      • ‘The chances of a watch being constructed by blind chance are astronomically small.’
      • ‘By blind chance, some of these emails reach customers of targeted organisations.’
      • ‘Are his destructive escapades nothing more than random luck and blind chance?’
      • ‘As inaccurate as the weapons were, especially on a galloping horse, he would only be hit by blind chance.’
      • ‘But Jonathan and Sara sense they are drawn to one another by more than dumb luck or blind chance.’
      • ‘My blind luck of being able to provide two versions of the correct answer saved me from the accusation of being a cheater.’
      • ‘What we may see as the handiwork of Pan or Isis, others may see as the blind workings of the physical laws that govern the universe.’
      • ‘Our lives, ruled by circumstance, by blind chance, are not our own.’
      • ‘Somebody has to win, and it was as easy to believe that Pete Astor had been favoured by blind chance as by an extra-dimensional being.’
      • ‘We don't need the forests for medicine; as often as not we need medicine to protect us from what emerges by blind chance from the forest.’
      • ‘But these little bits of blind chance or Fate take out individuals rather than eroding the ties of the hermetic village.’
      • ‘To a materialist, we are just congeries of atoms; and atoms must go whithersoever they are driven by the laws of physics and blind chance.’
      • ‘First consider the odds of forming this target sequence by blind chance, i.e., with monkeys at word-processors.’
      • ‘But Molly is smart, often outthinking or outguessing everyone, and occasionally aided by a bit of blind chance.’
      • ‘It is to say that the person got things right due to his own abilities, efforts and actions, rather than due to dumb luck, or blind chance, or something else.’
      • ‘I cannot look upon the Universe as the result of blind chance, yet I can see no evidence of beneficent design, or indeed design of any kind in the details.’
      • ‘When I consider the life of the honey bee, I shake my head that I once believed that such creatures were accidental products of blind chance!’
      • ‘It was inconceivable to Einstein that the laws of nature, at any level, were the result of the operation of blind chance, which was not susceptible to deeper explanation.’
      • ‘Just to pluck at blind random one of the many very thorny Operation Relex circumstances from the bastardly murky and unexamined recent historical fray.’
  • 3(of a corner or bend in a road) impossible to see around.

    ‘two trucks collided on a blind curve in the road’
    • ‘About half-way back to Boston I slowed down even further to go round a blind bend in the road, to come upon a police car and a mobile speed camera.’
    • ‘They certainly had no problem coping with a brisk run along a narrow, twisty country road where oncoming traffic and constant blind bends required repeated firm applications.’
    • ‘A car in front of the Welshman had pulled out a series of rocks into the road on a blind corner, and Hughes ran straight over the rocks, unable to avoid them due to the narrowness of the road.’
    • ‘Now, was she heading towards the blind bend in the road or was she going away from it?’
    • ‘There is also a trench right across the road on a blind corner that you cannot avoid.’
    • ‘The third adult in racing gear chose to proceed at full speed from the cycle lane into the northbound traffic lane, ignoring the blind corner with Library Road.’
    • ‘Gardaí and fire service personnel at the scene said the Opel appeared to have veered accidentally to its incorrect side of the road at a blind bend where the collision occurred.’
    • ‘At one point, we rounded a blind corner and startled a gigantic grizzly sow and her cub as they crossed a shallow, rocky creek.’
    • ‘With modern machinery and the will to do it, many of the blind bends on this road would be eradicated quickly.’
    • ‘I had maybe 75m visibility, on a very narrow, twisting road, full of blind corners.’
    • ‘Like a klutz, she's done this on a narrow stretch of road with a blind bend less than a hundred yards away.’
    • ‘So he parks outside on the pavement, forcing an elderly lady in a wheelchair on to the road on a blind bend.’
    • ‘He missed our hotel, and reversed the hundred metres round a blind bend at the same speed to drop us off.’
    • ‘On a road whose width barely allows two cars to pass, this lunatic came hurtling round a blind corner, narrowly missing me.’
    • ‘It is quite common for cars, forced to weave round the resulting blind bends, to have to come to an abrupt stop when they meet.’
    • ‘It was a quiet Sunday afternoon, a girl is out on her pony riding down the road when suddenly two young men in a car speed round a blind corner.’
    • ‘The poor condition of many roads, lack of warning signs at blind corners and sharp curves, and the fact that street lamps don't work at all times, contribute to accidents.’
    • ‘‘The road is also very narrow and the corner is blind next to the Dowley Gap tip,’ she said.’
    • ‘To put things in perspective, the turn was a 180-degree, blind, decreasing-radius turn.’
    • ‘There's a blind exit onto Bridge Street at the bottom of the hill and it is awfully dangerous trying to get out there.’
    1. 3.1(of a door or window) walled up.
      ‘fresco paintings on the blind windows’
      • ‘Glazed doors, provided that the panes are rectangular, can be reduced by removing one tier of panes; blind doors can be cut down at will.’
      • ‘When you first walked in and entered the small rotunda, there was a blind window that had been revealed.’
      • ‘The metal ladder was cooperative enough against rubber-soled boots, but moisture and time had warped the blind door, and there was no other way into the box.’
      • ‘Above the hood is a blind window with an arched head.’
      • ‘A blind door set into a pharaonic tomb to allow the spirit of the deceased to come and go.’
    2. 3.2Closed at one end.
      ‘a blind pipe’
      • ‘Bromley redefined Trypanites to include all blind, simple, unbranched borings in hard substrata with a single opening to the surface.’
      • ‘Such blind pools loose water by evaporation, or if below the water table remain as permanent bodies.’
      • ‘This blind-ended, complex structure is embryologically distinct from the body of the left atrium and is sometimes regarded as just a minor extension of the atrium.’
      • ‘The airways are blind-ended, acting in effect as air-filled capillary tubes sealed at one end.’
      • ‘A bifid ureter with a blind-ending branch is a rare form of partial duplication of ureter.’
      without exit, exitless, blocked, closed, barred, impassable
      View synonyms
  • 4British informal with negative (used in emphatic expressions) not the slightest.

    • ‘you don't know a blind thing!’
    • ‘A spokesman for the National Association of Headteachers said the downgrading should not make ‘a blind bit of difference’ to school drugs policies.’
    • ‘It amazes me how people seem to forget that they were young once and that no amount of pep talks, pleading or punishment would have made a blind bit of difference to how they carried on when away from their parents' beady eyes.’
    • ‘We consulted people on Goldiggers and the skatepark and then did not take a blind bit of notice of them.’
    • ‘That's fine, but the harsh reality is that even if, God forbid, a child is killed or seriously injured, it will not make a blind bit of difference in the long term.’
    • ‘Last week I was in the office and a senior lawyer was sitting at his desk, fast asleep, while his manager sat just four or five feet away, taking not a blind bit of notice.’
    • ‘So decent acts like The Arcade Fire and the Gorillaz make an appearance, but do you honestly think that's going to make a blind bit of difference?’
    • ‘If you're miserable on the inside, a teeny-weeny nose or super-duper frontage is not going to make a blind bit of difference.’
    • ‘Like it's ultimately gonna make a blind bit of difference, kids.’
    • ‘It is, I repeat, just greed on the part of the ownership and I bet my pointing it out to them won't make a blind bit of difference either.’
    • ‘On Continental Europe no one ever pays a blind bit of notice to them.’
    • ‘They're talking over each other and none of them notices that I'm not paying any of them a blind bit of attention.’
    • ‘What should writers do in order to avoid the kind of heartache which arises when you publish a book and no one takes a blind bit of notice?’
    • ‘Those are pretty serious charges, but they don't seem to do a blind bit of good.’
    • ‘The final act, back in the States, is even more fantastical, with an added twist, befitting such a corkscrew plot, which doesn't make a blind bit of sense.’
    • ‘I really don't know why anybody bothers to have them fitted, because nobody takes a blind bit of notice of them.’
    • ‘Thomas has been so instructed many times, but doesn't seem to have taken a blind bit of notice.’
    • ‘All these poxy rule changes in Formula One won't make a blind bit of difference in the long run.’
    • ‘He made decisions about funding feeling as though he were slicing up a cake that had already been cut and moving the wedges around without making a blind bit of difference.’
    • ‘I was pretty thrilled at grazing shoulders with such a celebrity; but there was not a paparazzo in sight, and no one else in the street was taking a blind bit of notice.’
    • ‘Despite not pushing for major changes, Williamson says the current regime hasn't made a blind bit of difference to the end user, and I'd have to agree with him.’
  • 5(of a plant) without buds, eyes, or terminal flowers.

    ‘planting too shallowly is the most common cause of bulbs coming up blind’
    • ‘It sounds cruel, but during one long hot summer I did once shock a blind camellia into flowering by withholding water for as long as I felt the plant could bear it.’
    • ‘One of the original reasons to burn the straw was to combat blind seed disease.’
    • ‘The non-germinating “blind-seeds” carry a mass of fungus tissue in the endosperm and are the carry-over phase of the disease.’
    • ‘Blind plants which occur a mature stage of the plant do so as a result of cultural conditions; the extent to which it occurs depends on the sensitivity of the variety’
    • ‘Dig carefully so the roots do not break away from the clump, which results in blind roots.’
  • 6informal Drunk.

    • ‘Originally the upper floor housed the council chambers, while the underneath had a storeroom and a blind house, where drunks were locked up for the night.’
    • ‘I finished the drink at the end of the little speech and threw it to the floor, suddenly becoming blind once more and having to clear the claret from my brow again.’
    • ‘Vodka is a blind stumble around the streets of Shettleston with your pants around your ankles, looking for your front teeth.’
    • ‘Thus, he feels compelled to drink himself blind for four days in Vienna.’
    • ‘Dorothy Parker could drink herself blind, and Anais Nin could lie in bed all day and talk dirty to herself.’

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily.

    ‘the injury temporarily blinded him’
    • ‘eyes blinded with tears’
    • ‘I said nothing, but merely nodded, tears temporarily blinding me, blurring my vision.’
    • ‘Five players were permanently blinded and a dozen more had permanent eye defects leading to reduced vision.’
    • ‘She was blinded by her tears and the smoke, so she couldn't see the burning timber above her that was about to fall.’
    • ‘Thunder cracked as a response to Malia's anger, and lightning flashed, blinding everyone temporarily.’
    • ‘One way of preventing the victims from seeing and knowing the regime's political agendas was to plunge them literally into the dark - to blind them.’
    • ‘The moon twinkled off the water, dazzling me, blinding me for a moment.’
    • ‘This deficiency blinds 500,000 children in over 70 countries every year.’
    • ‘Several times a rather energetic guy in a shirt that could blind at fifty paces came close to having my eye out with his elbow, and his high kicks were enough to bring down the lighting rig.’
    • ‘Both books feature fighters blinded in one eye due to gloves having padding illegally removed.’
    • ‘Orphaned and blinded from childhood, he became an ascetic freethinker and materialist.’
    • ‘Sentencing him, she said Margerum had lashed out in drink at someone who had done him no harm and said he could have left his victim blinded.’
    • ‘Burnley Crown Court heard Mr Cook, who works in computers, suffered a break to his retina and feared waking up blinded.’
    • ‘A man blinded in one eye by a samurai sword attack in Kidbrooke was the victim of mistaken identity, a court has heard.’
    • ‘St Dunstan's charity, which looks after servicemen and women blinded in the service of their country, organised the event.’
    • ‘It is the story of Samson, the mighty warrior who was betrayed by his lover, and then blinded and imprisoned by his enemies, the Philistines.’
    • ‘But in 1944, Norman returned to action by taking part in D-Day plus one, in which he was wounded in the face and nearly blinded.’
    • ‘Eric, blinded more than 20 years ago by a genetic disorder, has been getting one-and-a-half hours of help every Thursday morning.’
    • ‘For example, a royal court would blind or cut off the hand of a thief; a Church court might send a thief on a pilgrimage.’
    • ‘They hit the news in 1997 in Britain when they became a teenage fashion accessory and were then quickly converted into a weapon which could cause blinding.’
    • ‘‘I'm going to try and throw a flashbang at it, and blind the pilot inside,’ I informed him.’
    make blind, deprive of sight, deprive of vision, render unsighted, render sightless, put someone's eyes out, gouge someone's eyes out
    stop someone seeing, obscure someone's vision, block someone's vision, get in someone's line of vision
    dazzle
    View synonyms
  • 2be blindedDeprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception.

    ‘somehow Clare and I were blinded to the truth’
    • ‘a clever tactician blinded by passion’
    • ‘In the process, the patient is willfully blinded to the conduct that inevitably causes his misery in the first place.’
    • ‘He was used to getting his own way and was so enraged that he was blinded to the consequences of his actions.’
    • ‘I cried as I admitted that I was so selfish that I was blinded to the fact that Will had needed my help all along.’
    • ‘However, he was blinded to all other clinical and demographic data for this investigation.’
    • ‘But that perception can easily blind us to other aspects of homelessness.’
    • ‘Stalinism crippled us by castrating our moral passion, blinding us to the wrongs done to men if those wrongs were done in the name of Communism.’
    • ‘Or had I been blinded by my own passion, and my own desperate yearning for her to see me as I saw her?’
    • ‘She is blinded by his charm and she's doing these things that she normally would never do.’
    • ‘However, don't let these minor things blind you to the fact that The Big Book of Busts is actually an extremely important addition to any serious chess library.’
    • ‘But… now that she really thought about it, now that she didn't let anger blind her, just why did Aiden grab her book and throw it?’
    • ‘The Counter-Reformation proved to the outside world that the Catholic Church had recognised its past failings and was willing to reform itself rather than blind itself to its faults.’
    • ‘Even pretending to be an imbecile did not blind her to the fact that her advisors broke into sly smiles they quickly tried to conceal when they saw the piece of silk sticking out of her bag.’
    • ‘A minority still believed that it was possible and necessary to resist Germany, and refused to let anti-Communism blind them to the necessity for a Soviet alliance.’
    • ‘Such reactions either blind them to what you're trying to get across, or they go away so worried that they don't function effectively for days.’
    • ‘It starred Russell Crowe as a young skinhead on a path of self-destruction, though his ideals blind him to the damage he is doing to himself.’
    • ‘Perhaps our closeness to the intricacies of identity, including race and gender, blind us to what we have in common with humanity.’
    • ‘Don't let the fact that its reputation was tarnished by several lackluster sequels blind you to the original's charms.’
    • ‘Pitic may have let the internal disagreements blind him from the many uncertainties ahead, not least the survival of Yugoslavia itself.’
    • ‘What I'm trying to get at is that imposing notions of ‘equality’ on everyone may, in some situations, blind us to what is going on.’
    • ‘Don't let your enthusiasm for new ideas blind you to the possibility that maybe they will undo something of long standing that is really valuable.’
    deprive of understanding, deprive of perception, deprive of judgement, deprive of reason, deprive of sense
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1blind someone withConfuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand.
      ‘they try to blind you with science’
      • ‘Of the communists, Richard Wright concluded: ‘They're blind… Their enemies have blinded them with too much oppression.’’
      • ‘Jon has too much value cos he can blind them with science and they are confused by him.’
      • ‘Identifying with either side blinds you with ideology, makes up your mind for you and stops you thinking.’
      • ‘One shows its promise in tantalizing flashes, the other blinds us with its reckless skill.’
      • ‘But when O'Rourke is not blinding you with his offensiveness, he's dishing out tremendous observations on human nature.’
      • ‘You're blinding us with calculated, partisan gibberish.’
      • ‘It is, of course, deliberately provocative and designed to tempt an unwitting Unionite into criticising his choice of closure before blinding him with the weight and depth of his erudition.’
      • ‘They won't say that O'Dwyer has blinded them with insight.’
      • ‘She blinded me with science, and weird science at that.’
      • ‘It blinded me with details of how many of its clients were looking for a car just like mine.’
      • ‘So next time some geek tries to blind you with science by saying, ‘I'm translating some FORTRAN into BASIC, but I'd really like to re-do it in Assembler,’ you will have some idea what that means.’
      • ‘They probably won't blind you with science just yet, however.’
      • ‘All too often one is served by people who either blind you with science, or who haven't a clue but are trying to hide this.’
      • ‘Far from attempting to blind us with science on behalf of one side or the other, Mr Ridley is determined to open our eyes to what is staring us in the face: the fact that we are the product of a transition between the two.’
      • ‘Vander's contradictory impulses, to conceal and to reveal (to blind us with insight) are not exposed as a failing but revealed as inherent to speech.’
      • ‘We ritualize this process to make sure we don't allow the grief of great tragedies to blind us with mob fury, inflamed judgments and uninformed reasoning.’
      • ‘As I read this article I got that feeling that this was a case of trying to blind us with science.’
      • ‘Ross always tried to blind them with actuarial science to prove he was doing a good job when actually he wasn't.’
      • ‘Most managers in shops have no idea what the regulations say, and it's not difficult to blind them with a little bit of knowledge.’
      • ‘Kaltag could not feel the importance of this call, for he was blinded with anticipation.’
      overawe, awe, intimidate, daunt, deter, cow, abash
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1as plural noun the blindPeople who are unable to see.

    ‘guide dogs for the blind’
    • ‘Its steady, amiable temperament makes it a dependable guide dog for the blind.’
    • ‘On a different note, maybe you want your dog to become a service dog or guide dog for the blind.’
    • ‘Legend has it that the blind can recover their sight if they wash their eyes with only a handful of the miraculous water.’
    • ‘I come to bring good news, to free the oppressed, to give sight to the blind.’
    • ‘He showed you a few chords and that was it; an icon was born on that rooftop, a burning collection of meaningful words to give hope to the disaffected, purpose to the lost and sight to the blind.’
    • ‘I believe that the sick can be healed, the blind can have sight, and the dead can be raised.’
    • ‘Miniature medical machines that can bring sight to the blind and computers that work at the speed of light are no longer the stuff of futuristic novels.’
    • ‘The passage assumes that the blind will, in fact, want their sight back and the deaf to hear again, the lame to walk properly and dumb to speak.’
    • ‘This is a system where a beep is sounded when the lights turn red at a signal, so that the blind will know when to cross.’
    • ‘This is the second time India is participating in the world championships and games for the blind.’
    • ‘There is a specially designed chessboard and pieces for the blind.’
    • ‘Combining all three technologies, he developed the Kurzweil Reading Machine to assist the blind.’
    • ‘Joy traces his unease to a meeting with Ray Kurzweil, inventor of the first reading machine for the blind and author of The Age of Intelligent Machines.’
    • ‘This is not an autobiography but a book about blindness per se, by a writer who is blind, on how the severely visually impaired see the world and how the sighted perceive the blind.’
    • ‘He really does teach knitting to the blind in his spare time.’
    • ‘It was this military system that Braille adapted for the blind.’
    • ‘It is very easy to make a website available to the blind: don't use Flash.’
    • ‘Text is best for a small, but important and growing, group of Internet users, most obviously the blind.’
    • ‘The lines which follow speak of care for the pious, righteous, the poor, the captives, the blind.’
    • ‘In Germany there's a Christian organization which helps the blind in developing countries.’
  • 2A screen for a window, especially one on a roller or made of slats.

    ‘she pulled down the blinds’
    • ‘Sunlight poked through the slats in the white blinds over my window.’
    • ‘I shut my screen, window and blinds, and looked around my room.’
    • ‘The moon shines through the slats of the window blinds, casting stripes of light and shadow over the two beds in the semi-private room.’
    • ‘If eyes are the windows to the soul, Coach Willingham has the curtains pulled, blinds raised and windows cranked all the way open.’
    • ‘Now she was trapped in the darkness for the windows were covered with blinds and curtains.’
    • ‘For this project, you can use any covering you would use for a window, from blinds to curtains.’
    • ‘At one point, I noticed Terri's window blinds were pulled down.’
    • ‘He pulls the blinds down on the windows in the living room.’
    • ‘Alyssa walked slowly over to the window and pulled the blinds up.’
    • ‘The room had one small window, but the blinds were pulled over it.’
    • ‘Someone walked into the room making a noise sounding like they were pulling up blinds from windows.’
    • ‘Susan ordered windows with miniblinds sandwiched between the glass so she'd never need to clean another blind.’
    • ‘Harry Cat was all set for a long sleep in but Dolly was determined to rouse me as soon as the light filtered through the blind.’
    • ‘A boy came to the rescue of his four-year-old sister after a window blind cord became trapped around her neck.’
    • ‘Lobo started shuffling uphill, on crooked empty streets past blind-shuttered windows.’
    • ‘The blind covering the reception window was firmly down.’
    • ‘Anna watched as the plane flew over and through all the clouds in the sky before pulling the blind back over the window.’
    • ‘Each inhabitant has chosen an image that most represents their life to be traced onto a blind affixed to the windows of the south-facing facade.’
    • ‘The desk can then be placed under the window, and the blind used to restrict light when needed.’
    • ‘Once the door had been shut and locked, Krupka moved to the window and pulled the blind down.’
    screen, shade, louvre, awning, canopy, sunshade, curtain, shutter, cover, covering, protection
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1British An awning over a shop window.
      ‘For the past 30 years the 58-year-old has worked for a company in Devon that produces blinds and awnings.’
      • ‘That is why, for the past 10 years, McLeod has watched his firm, which specialises in manufacturing shop blinds and awnings, flourish.’
      • ‘Having been here when Queen Victoria reigned, Deans is the only blinds company that is still in business who can provide an authentic Victorian or Edwardian awning to complete the finishing touch to a serious restoration project on a shop, restaurant or even a special private house.’
      • ‘On the left just above the logo is a shop blind that used to protect the meat in the window display from sunshine.’
      • ‘The traditional box blind is still widely used today, being probably the most durable type of awning still manufactured.’
  • 3in singular Something designed to conceal one's real intentions.

    ‘he phoned again from his own home: that was just a blind for his wife’
    • ‘The aversion to addressing race concerns that is demonstrated through this research carries through to an aversion to discussing race as a driver in and a blind for bad social policy.’
    • ‘‘Ruse’ applies to that which is contrived as a blind for one's real intentions or for the truth.’
    • ‘Our advantages and disadvantages then, can be summarized as follows:… 6. Serves as a blind for the real project.’
    • ‘Its members rarely published any verse or stories for adult market publications, and wrote instead for children's magazines, a blind for some of the most experimental work in the Stalinist era.’
    • ‘That phrase ‘Parlay cheval ou’ [tell my horse] is in daily, hourly use in Haiti and no doubt it is used as a blind for self-expression.’
    deception, camouflage, screen, smokescreen, front, facade, cover, disguise, cloak, pretext, masquerade, mask, feint
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1A hiding place.
      • ‘you can sometimes use your car as a blind’
    2. 3.2North American A camouflaged shelter used by hunters to get close to wildlife.
      ‘a duck blind’
      • ‘Add a camouflage blind from Hunter's View to your customer's purchase and you have made him totally invisible.’
      • ‘They'll even serve as a stool in camp or duck blind.’
      • ‘As just one example, last fall I had a chance to see how the '03 500i handled multiple soakings when I used it as a mobile duck blind.’
      • ‘It wasn't that long ago when something as specialized as a dedicated waterfowl gun was pretty rare in the average duck blind or goose pit.’
      • ‘Particularly if the bird isn't accustomed to the presence of humans, you will most likely need to use a blind in order to get close enough for a good shot.’
      • ‘The hunters scattered as the bolt demolished the plywood blind.’
      • ‘A coyote howled so close that I thought it might reach into the blind and slap me with a rough paw.’
      • ‘Wisconsin hunters, who shoot deer with rifles from a blind or tree stand, found Kerry's a curious and unlikely technique.’
      • ‘That afternoon I climbed into a different stand, a 12-foot tower blind overlooking a remote scope of brush.’
      • ‘A portable tripod or ground blind is an effective ploy, one that can be established with minimal intrusion.’
      • ‘Sit in a windmill or ground blind by a waterhole and an opportunity can come from as close as 20 or 30 paces.’
      • ‘Several winters ago, I spent a morning in a makeshift ground blind on a rocky hillside near Laredo.’
      • ‘It shows a black-backed jackal framed by the legs of an elephant, and the accompanying text claims that the jackal is using the elephant's legs as a hunting blind.’
      • ‘Too many hunters fail to wear Coast Guard-approved life jackets while traveling to and from the hunting blind.’
      • ‘You watch the sun come up on a cold winter morning hunkered down in a hunting blind or pray to God you don't fall in the river at midnight when you're running your trotline.’
      • ‘It even doubles as an ice fishing shack or duck hunting blind.’
      • ‘One day I'm sitting in a duck blind in backwoods Louisiana.’
      • ‘The next scene shows father and son together ‘hunting’ via a TV game from a duck blind set up in their living room.’
      • ‘A couple of weeks ago, my friend Dave and I were sitting in a duck blind.’
      • ‘In fact they are in a duck blind waiting for a flock to come over.’
  • 4British informal, dated A heavy drinking bout.

    • ‘he's off on a blind again’
    drinking bout, debauch
    View synonyms
  • 5British A legitimate business concealing a criminal enterprise.

    ‘The third time he wins, and afterward uses a big-town barber shop as a blind for his elaborate gambling house.’
    • ‘Papa and Mama Aven use their quiet bookstore as a blind for smuggling diamonds.’
    • ‘The boys from the Press had been told to lay off investigations - the word was that the Corporation was a blind for something much bigger.’
    • ‘The Boy's news stand, a blind for his real operations.’
    • ‘The nightly Rent Party, of course, was merely a ‘blind’ for more illegitimate activities that catered primarily to the desire of travelling salesmen, Pullman porters, inter-state truck drivers other transients, for some place to stop and amuse themselves.’

adverb

  • 1Without being able to see clearly.

    ‘he was the first pilot in history to fly blind’
    • ‘I heard it and felt it, but did the whole thing blind.’
    • ‘Divson obliged, his single hand not shaking in the least as his free one searched blind for the objects, produced them and slid them to Prast.’
    • ‘It was like fighting blind, and against a ferocious wild cat at that.’
    • ‘To explain: if you're listening to songs blind, you really need two functions: next, and play/stop.’
    • ‘Driving blind, he came over the hill to find his ball on a gorse-infested slope.’
    1. 1.1Without having all the relevant information; unprepared.
      ‘he was going into the interview blind’
      • ‘Legislatures who pass RFRAs, then, are legislating blind.’
      • ‘In short, Hatfill would no longer be proceeding blind.’
      • ‘I won't have the minor characters, I won't have the solution to the problem; I'm writing blind.’
      • ‘One can only, most favorably, conclude that Ford is travelling blind.’
      • ‘It would be nearly impossible (although we have done it) to do this all blind.’
      • ‘Maddux will enter the free agent market blind for the first time in his life, and actually with lack of desiring competitors.’
      • ‘I was the only one who'd been inside Agent HQ before - the rest were running blind.’
      • ‘The players now have more information about who they are playing against, and because of that they're not going into games blind any more.’
      • ‘It is hoped that such a direct involvement with message board will enable with a higher ‘charge’ than if one were coming to the experiment blind.’
    2. 1.2(of a stake in poker and other games) put up by a player before the cards dealt are seen.
      ‘When there is that extra dead money out there, it is simply terrible to give two people free rides, and the small blind a cheap look, when you have a playable hand in best position.’
      • ‘Simply calling the big blind would make no sense if hands indeed ran close together in value.’
      • ‘Others allow the dealer to identify one trick before play begins, the winner of which gets the blind along with the trick.’
      • ‘The last two cards (or three when you play with a joker) form the blind.’
      • ‘The fact that no one will pick may also indicate that crucial high trumps are in the blind.’

Phrases

    as blind as a bat
    informal
    • Having very bad eyesight.

      • ‘she's as blind as a bat without glasses’
      • ‘The ringleader said I couldn't identify them because I was blind as a bat.’
      • ‘However encyclopaedic your knowledge of antiques, if you're blind as a bat, forget it.’
      • ‘It knocked my glasses off and I am as blind as a bat without them.’
      • ‘At 8:30, the security guards show up, the banker takes off his glasses (he's blind as a bat without 'em) and at 10:00, they open the vault door.’
      • ‘I know you are blind as a bat, but come on, Lily.’
      • ‘River has perfect eyesight, as he frequently reminds my older brother, who is blind as a bat and wears glasses 24-7.’
      • ‘‘Yes, I'm blind as a bat,’ he said sarcastically.’
      • ‘He just looked around, obviously blind as a bat.’
      • ‘Struggling to keep her wayward fringe at bay, Hailey meandered away from the beach blind as a bat, until she bumped into someone or something.’
      • ‘You have to be blind as a bat not to see that the second part is a fraud.’
      visually impaired, unsighted, sightless, visionless, unseeing, stone blind, eyeless
      View synonyms
    blind drunk
    informal
    • Extremely drunk.

      • ‘Unsurprisingly, Mr Manners took to blundering into my flat at 3.30 am in a most unchivalrous manner: blind drunk, ranting that his mother didn't love him, and mistaking my saxophone case for a lavatory.’
      • ‘The blog entry I wanted to write claimed that I was able to install Movable Type Blacklist without a hitch despite being blind drunk and, temporarily, a willful hater of computers.’
      • ‘I thought of him while writing this piece because in 1916 he challenged Jack Johnson, the Heavyweight Champion of the World, to a fight, turned up blind drunk and lost within one round.’
      • ‘Are there really people in the world who need to be told not to get blind drunk and criticize the boss's politics and/or fashion choices at the company Christmas party?’
      • ‘Never, ever go out and get blind drunk with Georgia, Paul, Ronald and Iain and tell them intimate details of your life and expect that they will forget them and not taunt you with them the following morning.’
      • ‘I just can't remember doing it, just being on the floor, then feeling sick and deciding to sit up on my bed for a bit, ever the pragmatist, even when blind drunk, in case I was concussed.’
      • ‘The Irish (and crowds of people pretending to be Irish) celebrate St Patrick's Day with the day off work and the chance to get blind drunk on Guinness.’
      • ‘Until the previous day Mr Fairclough had lived in Mr Bartlett's flat in Strensall, but Mr Bartlett had asked him to leave for either taking cocaine or being blind drunk.’
      • ‘It's quite sweet she thinks people go to Vegas just to see Celine Dion, rather than just stumbling in blind drunk after losing their kid's college funds on the craps table.’
      • ‘If he hadn't been blind, staggering drunk, he probably wouldn't have missed.’
    turn a blind eye
    • Pretend not to notice.

      ‘please, don't turn a blind eye to what is happening’
      • ‘We cannot continue to turn a blind eye or ear and pretend that all is well when many people are hurting and yearning for help.’
      • ‘In many ways, I think he's given the Saudis a pass and he's turned a blind eye to them.’
      • ‘It is a problem people are prepared to turn a blind eye to it because people rarely notice these sites as they are covered over.’
      • ‘Please, don't turn a blind eye or passively ignore what is happening.’
      • ‘We cannot have a church which ignores the modern world and which turns a blind eye to society.’
      • ‘He turns a blind eye to the weapons that pass illegally through Shannon.’
      • ‘To maintain suspicion requires not only ignoring the flaws in Wakefield's research, but also turning a blind eye to the large number of studies which show no causal link.’
      • ‘But there's nothing amicable or admirable about food prepared and presented as carelessly as this restaurant's often is, about an emphasis on quantity that turns a blind eye to quality.’
      • ‘Human nature makes men and their companies greedy and makes corrupt governments turn blind eyes.’
      • ‘The heads of schools in some quarters show a blind eye to misconduct.’
    rob someone blind
    US informal
    • Rob or cheat someone in a comprehensive or merciless way.

      • ‘But I don't see anyone, even Davis who let them rob us blind, doing that.’
      • ‘Dry cleaners and hairdressers don't rob you blind.’
      • ‘I suspect this is one of those evil schemes where he and his crony pray on the innocence of passing motorists so they may take advantage of you and rob you blind.’
      • ‘We ended up with a village full of psychos and crooks who'd rob you blind as soon as look at you.’
      • ‘You had encountered him in one of your many adventures and they had tried to trick you so they could rob you blind.’
      • ‘What happens in terms of the kinds of things we're talking about here, where they're stealing each other's phone calls and robbing each other blind?’
      • ‘Right… before the peddler got himself robbed blind, Mom spent all the money she had on a pair of charms.’
      • ‘Shrouded in paternalistic jingo, the owners robbed and cheated the players blind.’
      • ‘The only future for young tilers in this state was to be robbed blind and then thrown on the scrap heap when they burned out at an early age.’
      • ‘They robbed Detroit blind and now they're after New York.’

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German blind.