Main definitions of boo in English

: boo1boo2

boo1

exclamation

  • 1Said suddenly to surprise someone who is unaware of one's presence.

    ‘‘Boo!’ she cried, jumping up to frighten him’
    • ‘Behind the church, right at the back of the graveyard (a graveyard I used to have to walk past in the dark with a sadistic little sister who thought it funny to say boo) is a tiny ruin.’
    • ‘I kept looking at them, waiting for a face to appear, to say hi or boo.’
    • ‘Ethan looked kind of nervous, I had the sudden urge to jump up and scream boo just to see what he'd do.’
    • ‘‘When he walks in we'll jump out and say boo,’ Sam whispered as well.’
  • 2Said to show disapproval or contempt.

    ‘‘There's only one bar.’ ‘Boo!’’
    • ‘Unfortunately, one of the curtain rod kits I'd bought didn't have the mounting hardware inside, so I'm going to have to get another one - boo!’
    • ‘I have to get the whole broken on-off button on my cell phone seen to or else buy a new phone - boo!’
    • ‘Bianca gets every day except Tuesday off coz she's doing her IT subjects via distance. boo!’
    • ‘Even worse, you have to fill in a dreaded tax return every year - boo!’
    • ‘They also brew their Vienna lager and Star Spangled Banner (an American pale ale) on occasion, but neither of these were available to try - boo!’
    • ‘I didn't find what I was looking for though, boo.’
    • ‘There didn't appear to be any kind of legal medication I could take that would keep me awake 24/7 to experience everything… boo.’
    • ‘Lately, I seem to be having quite a bit of free time upon my hands, so all that I can say is… boo!’
    • ‘Thus it may be a while before I blog properly again. Boo.’
    • ‘It's been great, but now I'm really poor, so I need to work. boo.’
    • ‘But I don't have time to call them, and every time I sit down to write a letter, I end up with some super cheesy gag of an invite. Boo.’

noun

  • An utterance of ‘boo’ to show disapproval of a speaker or performer.

    ‘the audience greeted this comment with boos and hisses’
    • ‘As Moore shouted over boos and cheers, most of the nominees who had just given him a standing ovation sat silent.’
    • ‘As the march swung past Number 10 there was a cacophony of whistles, boos, jeers and insults.’
    • ‘Shouts, boos, whistles from the crowd sheltering in the marquees.’
    • ‘The post-match analysts then came on to boos and hisses.’
    • ‘Only when he is greeted with boos and hisses does it become clear that the cries of ‘author, author’ are ironic.’
    • ‘Her pleasantness is met with boos, hoots and catcalls.’
    • ‘The evil Sheriff of Nottingham was played excellently and evoked plenty of hisses and boos - as very good baddie should!’
    • ‘He returned yesterday to a deafening roar of hisses and boos and expletives.’
    • ‘The fans of that school screamed and shouted over the boos and hisses.’
    • ‘A chorus of boos and hisses greeted this comment.’
    • ‘The moment the headmaster said this, there was a loud eruption of boos and hisses.’
    • ‘The audience responded with a cascade of hisses and boos.’
    • ‘Lots of hisses and boos to the Chancellor for not relenting on that score.’
    • ‘I want to hear the boos and jeers up here in Sin City.’
    • ‘During a home game against Dunfermline the player's misfiring performance was subjected to a sustained chorus of boos and jeers from his own fans.’
    • ‘The audience's boos, screams, and applause determines who wins the fight.’
    • ‘When James came on to take a bow, never before had Maugham heard ‘such an outburst of boos and catcalls’.’
    • ‘Three hundred policemen cleared the yard outside and the couple were taken away in a police van to boos and jeers from the waiting crowd.’
    • ‘The response drew boos and hisses from some journalists and several walked out.’
    • ‘The two cars were greeted with boos and whistles from the grandstands as they pulled up after the race.’
    shout, yell, cry, howl, scream, shriek, whoop, whistle

verbboos, booing, booed

  • Say ‘boo’ to show disapproval of a speaker or performer.

    no object ‘they booed and hissed when he stepped on stage’
    with object ‘the team were booed off the pitch’
    • ‘Angry crowds attended public meetings organised by the Commission, jeering and booing the speakers.’
    • ‘Before he could finish, the crowd showed their disapproval by booing him off the stage.’
    • ‘Raymond actually booed when they disappeared off the right edge of the monitor.’
    • ‘The evil Abanazer had the audience booing and hissing from the start.’
    • ‘They kept traveling the country trying to sell it and people kept booing and hissing them down.’
    • ‘The diplomat explained that people were booing, an expression of disapproval.’
    • ‘The meeting featured loud hooting, hissing and booing from the supporters of the various positions.’
    • ‘The audience was booing and heckling, which prompted the cops to call for backup.’
    • ‘From the start, his speech was accompanied by a chorus of whistling and booing.’
    • ‘It's hard to imagine anyone walking out on this performance, much less booing it.’
    • ‘The workers booed and jeered as the manger of the factory addressed their annual Christmas meeting.’
    • ‘Managers and directors were booed and jeered at as they left and entered the building.’
    • ‘The audience at the Social Forum booed and hissed him so loudly that he had to leave the stage.’
    • ‘A figure of fun, his name was jeered for his hypocrisy, booed for his betrayal.’
    • ‘People are booing, and I don't even try to stop them as this ragtag of veteran-looking musicians play on.’
    • ‘He actually came out and - when the crowd was booing and asked them to calm down.’
    • ‘At that time the Tricolour was banned, so we gave the police some trouble in taking the flags down, the crowds booing them.’
    • ‘Rather than booing, fans recall it was more a wall of silence that greeted his efforts, but they would get their comeuppance soon enough.’
    • ‘My brother, who was at the ceremony and game did confirm that yes, people were booing the PM quite openly.’
    • ‘The ever present gangs, all set to boo them, were also in full swing whenever the vocals chords missed the notes.’
    taunt, mock, scoff at, ridicule, laugh at, sneer at, deride, tease, insult, abuse, jibe, jibe at, scorn, shout disapproval, shout disapproval at
    taunt, sneer, insult, shout, jibe, boo, hiss, catcall

Phrases

    wouldn't say boo to a goose
    • Used to emphasize that someone is very timid.

      ‘he seemed the kind of chap who wouldn't say boo to a goose’
      • ‘My youngest son wouldn't say boo to a goose and he was absolutely petrified.’
      • ‘It turns out that the lad who looks like a no-nonsense squaddie on the park wouldn't say boo to a goose outwith those environs.’
      • ‘‘He was quite a quiet guy who kept himself to himself - you always got the impression he wouldn't say boo to a goose,’ said Mr Hemmings.’
      • ‘A gentle soul of a man who wouldn't say boo to a goose.’
      • ‘When I started, I was just a very quiet north-Kent girl who didn't say boo to a goose.’
      • ‘There should be someone who can say boo to the goose.’
      • ‘By now, it was clear he didn't have wits enough to say boo to a goose.’
      • ‘At work neither of them would say boo to the proverbial goose, yet here they are behaving like a couple of irritating street tykes.’
      • ‘Before you can say boo to a goose, we enter dangerous ground where relatively harmless differences between people become a cause for complaint and division.’
      • ‘He may have been a small nervous man who would not say boo to a goose.’
      • ‘If I hadn't met him, I'd probably still be cowering in a corner somewhere, refusing to say boo to a goose.’
      • ‘Mrs Dalton, a neighbour, said: ‘She didn't say boo to a goose.’’

Origin

Early 19th century (in boo (sense 2 of the exclamation)): imitative of the lowing of oxen.

Pronunciation

boo

/buː/

Main definitions of boo in English

: boo1boo2

boo2

noun

informalUS
  • A person's boyfriend or girlfriend.

    • ‘Some things I view as sacred and extremely personal that I wouldn't share… these include times shared with my boo.’
    • ‘‘I'm not doubting what happened, boo,’ Shayna began sweetly.’
    • ‘She has also made solo inroads, doing that song about being with her boo.’
    • ‘But we're no clearer about the line ‘even when I'm with my boo / you know I'm crazy over you.’’
    • ‘You turn ma boo against me, with your contemptuous lies.’

Origin

1980s origin uncertain; probably an alteration of French beau ‘boyfriend, male admirer’.

Pronunciation

boo

/buː/