Definition of branch in English:

branch

Pronunciation /bran(t)SH/ /bræn(t)ʃ/

See synonyms for branch

Translate branch into Spanish

noun

  • 1A part of a tree which grows out from the trunk or from a bough.

    ‘Sophie was in the branches of a tree eating an apple’
    • ‘Of special interest are the bromeliads that grow on trunks and along branches of big trees.’
    • ‘Twenty or thirty large, gently fluted pods grow directly from the tree's trunk and branches, dangling like holiday ornaments.’
    • ‘In other cases, growing trees had their branches cut regularly on one side, because they leaned on to private property; the trees grew up lopsided and leaned far on to the roads.’
    • ‘In a branched system, a single pipe feeds smaller pipes along the way much like a tree trunk feeds the branches.’
    • ‘This time he sang for his tree to grow thick branches and leaves to shelter him in this forbidding place.’
    • ‘They grow on the tree branches and bloom for two months only, during July and August.’
    • ‘Again and again, chronologers applied the same techniques to the materials they assembled along the tree's trunk and branches.’
    • ‘The steel columns holding up the roof will resemble the trunks and branches of trees.’
    • ‘And my friend told me that you can graft an apple branch into a peach tree, but the branch will still grow apples.’
    • ‘As a result, student work will improve if they try drawing trees that show branches growing toward them and - to a lesser extent - away from them.’
    • ‘Tucked away in the forest, and only accessible to those with local knowledge, its old contorted paperbark trees exhibited gnarly branches, trunks and burls.’
    • ‘Open-grown or widely spaced trees have larger-diameter dead branches than trees grown at narrower spacing.’
    • ‘Five large hippo-like creatures were grazing on tall, violet flowers growing out from the branches of nearby trees.’
    • ‘The position is similar to that where branches of trees growing on neighbouring property encroach across the boundary.’
    • ‘People are collecting the branches and boughs of trees smashed down by the icy snow.’
    • ‘The curling movement of the smoke is echoed in the arabesques formed by the curving trunks and branches of two trees, which are also reflected in a pond in the foreground.’
    • ‘Most species find food while climbing on tree trunks or branches.’
    • ‘Little hooks line the trunk and branches of the tree, on which children can hang their creations or the drawings of their dreams and wishes.’
    • ‘Most people are likely to think of winter landscapes as pictures made up of stark contrasts, of dark tree trunks and branches against white snow.’
    • ‘A profusion of mosses, liverworts, lichens and ferns cover the woodland floor and festoon tree trunks and branches.’
    bough, limb, arm, offshoot
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A lateral extension or subdivision extending from the main part of something, typically one extending from a river, road, or railway.
      ‘a branch of the Susquehanna River’
      • ‘In the Rio Negro, it inhabits the large swamps that form where tributaries meet the main branch of the river.’
      • ‘That hill led to the back of another sight, and that sight was connected to a branch of the main road.’
      • ‘The main station is being built at Ondangwa where the railway branches to Oshakati and to Oshikango.’
      • ‘Several small branches of the corridor extend north and south of the main corridor.’
      • ‘From there it will be carried up into the largest vein of the body and into the right side of the heart, then into the main branches of the arteries to the lung, where it will impact, blocking the blood flow.’
      • ‘It is not officially a branch, but rather an extension of the main line first named the Oshawa Subdivision and re-named the Belleville Subdivision.’
      • ‘The mid-April snow storm will provide significant moisture for increased streamflow on the southern branch of the Platte River in Colorado.’
      • ‘But this map also clearly shows that the river has many canals, streams, branches and tributaries.’
      • ‘Private GEO-TV said the bus was traveling along the Karakoram highway in Kohistan when it left the road and fell into a branch of the Indus river.’
      • ‘Shakadang Stream is a branch of the Liwu River, which cuts through rock layers 9 million years old to carve the Taroko Gorge.’
      • ‘Beyond a collection of compact, stone cottages, which were contemporaries of the Seadog's Roost, a minor branch of the road curved to the left.’
      • ‘Second, Goondiwindi's water park incorporates the Serpentine Creek, a branch of the Macintyre River.’
      • ‘A mistake at a university in Laval and a railway branch built by the Canadian National changed things.’
      • ‘My original intent was to ride all three branches of Metro North's New Haven Line in Connecticut.’
      • ‘He's going to come to a number of branches in the road, where he will choose, or events will choose, which road is taken.’
      • ‘Georgia was also on one of the branches of the Silk Road, which carried trade from China and India to Europe.’
      • ‘They took the western branch of the road to begin with.’
      • ‘At this point they took the eastern branch of the road and walked for another five days.’
      • ‘We walked through endless marble corridors that twisted and turned with many branches leading from the main thoroughfare.’
      • ‘Farther upstream, two branches of the river offer wilder rainbows and brook trout.’
      tributary, feeder, side stream
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    2. 1.2A division or office of a large business or organization, operating locally or having a particular function.
      ‘he went to work at our Boston branch’
      • ‘Postbank operates 30 branches and 93 offices across the country and is represented in about 2300 post offices in Bulgaria.’
      • ‘In the Rangoon division, 18 out of 40 branch offices are now operating, with nine permitted to put up their old signboards.’
      • ‘This organization replaced an association of NGOs working for alcohol abstinence and had branch offices operating on regional and local levels.’
      • ‘Experienced branch managers will operate the elevators.’
      • ‘As the leading bank for businesses, with a network of over 1600 branches and 1400 business managers, no one is better placed to help businesses succeed.’
      • ‘Instead of being located in branches, business bank managers are being rehoused in three centralised sites in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Inverness.’
      • ‘The idea is to make it easier for small businesses and branch offices to manage security risks more efficiently by using a single appliance.’
      • ‘The layoffs affected 14 employees locally and 11 in branch offices.’
      • ‘It ran a big trading business and had branch offices in many locations such as Osaka, Kobe and Hokkaido.’
      • ‘The unions, which function as virtual corporate branch offices, immediately got the message.’
      • ‘In most cases of loan default, the axe always falls on the branch manager and middle-level officers.’
      • ‘The arrangement breaks down the division between headquarters and branch offices.’
      • ‘Remote workers, branch offices and small businesses have all been persuaded of the advantages of the appliance route.’
      • ‘He was surprised by the willingness of branch managers to merge businesses and share common facilities without head office intervention.’
      • ‘He said he had an opportunity to open a branch office for an established document-imaging business that two friends of his had started in another state.’
      • ‘This program aims at strengthening the influence of the branch organizations and helping the harmonization of the local legislation with that of the Union.’
      • ‘Not only is the branch post office of essential use to the people of the community, but it also is a centre of vital community communication and a social meeting place.’
      • ‘The branch managers and compliance officers failed in their duty.’
      • ‘Twenty-eight locally registered banks and six branches of foreign banks operate in the country.’
      • ‘Post Office bosses say there are too many branches chasing too little business.’
      division, subdivision, section, subsection, department, sector, part, side, wing
      office, bureau, agency
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3A conceptual subdivision of something, especially a family, group of languages, or a subject.
      ‘a branch of mathematics called graph theory’
      • ‘Otherwise, the tongues spoken in Indonesia belong to several branches of the Austronesian language family.’
      • ‘All the national languages, with the exception of the official language, English, are Bantu, a branch of the Niger-Congo language family.’
      • ‘The Estonian language is a branch of the Baltic-Finnish group of the Finno-Ugric family, related to Finnish.’
      • ‘Thus, Sanskrit, instead of being the mother of all Indo-European languages, became just a branch of their huge family.’
      • ‘It belongs to the Tibeto-Burman branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.’
      • ‘Serbo-Croatian belongs to the Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family.’
      • ‘Russian is one of three East Slavic languages of the Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family.’
      • ‘Over the years some branches of the family have been blighted by a congenital heart defect but Mrs Pike's illness was coincidental, say friends, because she was adopted.’
      • ‘Because in India, family bonding is still strong, and marriage is one occasion where distant branches of the family are remembered and invited.’
      • ‘Greyhounds, red dragons and portcullises belonging to heraldry of various family branches finish off the decorations.’
      • ‘Two branches of the family came out to Australia together in 1878.’
      • ‘There are many differences between these two branches of the language, and this word is one instance.’
      • ‘I have a feeling you and I are from different branches of the same family!’
      • ‘Family branches take turns to host the ceremony, with the expenditure shared by the whole village.’
      • ‘The family now had branches firmly settled in Michigan and Massachusetts.’
      • ‘A new branch of the English language has emerged to describe the shady practice, with phishing, pharming, keylogging and spyware among the recently coined words.’
      • ‘And we will head out to my great-grandmother's place to meet with the branch of the family I'd rather not meet.’
      • ‘Which of us, after all, has grown up in an apartment block specifically built to house, on each of its eight floors, a different branch of our own family?’
      • ‘Now I must explain that my family - or branches thereof - have lived in South Africa for 154 years.’
      • ‘Hungarian belongs to the Ugor branch of the Finno-Ugric language family.’
    4. 1.4Computing A control structure in which one of several alternative sets of program statements is selected for execution.
      ‘This processor uses dynamic execution, a combination of improved branch prediction, speculative execution and data flow analysis.’
      • ‘To achieve highly accurate branch prediction, it is necessary not only to allocate more resources to branch prediction hardware but also to improve the understanding of branch execution characteristics.’
      • ‘The second table, called the global predictor, predicts the branch direction based on the actual path of execution to reach the branch.’
      • ‘If you play with this experimental branch, please send some feedback!’

intransitive verb

[no object]
  • 1(of a road or path) divide into one or more subdivisions.

    • ‘follow this track south until it branches into two’
    fork, bifurcate, divide, subdivide, split, separate, go in different directions
    diverge from, deviate from, depart from, turn aside from, shoot off from, split off from, go off at a tangent from
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1branch offDiverge from the main route or part.
      • ‘the road branched off at the market town’
      swerve, career, skew, swing, sheer, weave, wheel
      View synonyms
  • 2(of a tree or plant) bear or send out branches.

    ‘this rose has a tendency to branch and spread at the top’
    • ‘the branching heads of large yellow daisies’

Phrasal Verbs

    branch out
    • Extend or expand one's activities or interests in a new direction.

      ‘the company is branching out into Europe’
      • ‘he decided to branch out on his own as a ship repairer’

Origin

Middle English from Old French branche, from late Latin branca ‘paw’.