Definition of challenge in English:

challenge

See synonyms for challenge

Translate challenge into Spanish

noun

  • 1A call to take part in a contest or competition, especially a duel.

    ‘he accepted the challenge’
    • ‘Because of this idea of a competitive country, open to the biggest international challenges, I decided to be associated with the creation of A1 Team Portugal.’
    • ‘A diversity of masculine subjectivities is mobilized around and through Spike as he comes to terms with challenges to his power.’
    • ‘The obsession of kite flying can also be seen in competitive kite challenges.’
    • ‘The Edinburgh side were quick to rise to the challenge and with their superior forward play they denied the Border men any more points in the first half.’
    • ‘Let us assume for a second that I have decided to take the challenge.’
    • ‘But after three years of frantic knitting, they decided to end the challenge, despite reaching halfway.’
    • ‘Ian Fitzgerald returned to competitive action in a challenge against Roscommon last Sunday.’
    • ‘Yet they gamely rose to the challenge, fighting the Tabs to the bitter end.’
    • ‘She has to judge the strength of the challenge from the other crews and dictate the response of her own crew.’
    • ‘This time, they had decided, they would accept the challenge.’
    • ‘The 1993 election saw Prime Minister Keating fight a challenge from the new Liberal Leader Dr John Hewson.’
    • ‘Rosa Parks challenged us to fight for our soul, and we accepted the challenge.’
    • ‘On this occasion, he mistakenly believed that they would not meet his challenge by fighting.’
    • ‘And, those in the treasury benches, far from going on the defensive, took up the challenge.’
    • ‘The dream of gold or silver became a reality when they took up the challenge of a Mayo team with a strong tradition in the sport.’
    • ‘A promising start for Ilkley in a season that will contain some very stern challenges and some easier contests.’
    • ‘The Australian champion throws off the challenge of Pirrie, the Canadian youth, and just wins a great race.’
    • ‘Needless to say the Sri Lanka Air Force Cycling Club rode to easy victory in more than 20 races with rarely a challenge.’
    • ‘I can still see that mighty frame of his winning crucial challenges in vital championship games.’
    • ‘John beat challenges from 399 other contestants to take the title by knocking seven Yorkshire puddings from their perch using a six-ounce black pudding.’
    dare, provocation
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A task or situation that tests someone's abilities.
      ‘the ridge is a challenge for experienced climbers’
      • ‘The novice traveler often must undergo tests or challenges, but the experienced holy person is familiar with the road and the terrain and encounters no such problems.’
      • ‘Every day, the dozy dozen face a series of challenges and tasks designed to test the sleep-deprived.’
      • ‘It was his brother, Matthew, an architect, who took up the challenge of linking the tiny stone school buildings and turning them into a home.’
      • ‘Many brave souls took up the challenge, but only two could succeed.’
      • ‘He ran the Great North Run last year and took up the challenge of the marathon.’
      • ‘My uncle took up the challenge and bolted out to the rescue.’
      • ‘The opthalmologist Robert D' Amato took up the challenge of finding such a drug in the early 1990s.’
      • ‘The wannabes leave their lives behind for two months and undergo tests, missions and challenges that are based on real spy training programmes.’
      • ‘One of peace activists' biggest challenges now may be deciding whether broadening their scope will dilute their public profile.’
      • ‘Julie gave a presentation on blogging as a social tool and the challenges in deciding what to blog, what to keep private, and what your online self really is.’
      • ‘Good question - though he acknowledges that a seaside property of this one's age offers plenty of challenges in terms of repairs and renovation.’
      • ‘There are only three people in the game at this point who are competitive at the challenges.’
      • ‘Hungry for a new challenge, he fought his way through ‘God Save the Queen’.’
      • ‘I decided to take a challenge and registered myself for a spring session offering of introductory Latin.’
      • ‘Pat said he coped with illness by treating it as a challenge, fighting for the one life he has and making the most of it.’
      • ‘Traditional concepts of security were woefully inadequate to meet the new challenges faced by humankind.’
      • ‘The smallest gardens can present the biggest design challenges, but a professional designer can work picture-perfect magic.’
      • ‘Meeting the pressing security challenges of the 21st century will require new ideas, initiatives, and energy.’
      • ‘One of today's greatest challenges for young people working for change is to fight complacency.’
      • ‘The main challenges facing agencies are a shortage of trucks and the poor condition of some roads.’
      problem, difficult task, test, trial
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2An attempt to win a contest or championship in a sport.
      ‘a world title challenge’
      • ‘Manchester United have won through November in a manner that should presage a championship challenge.’
      • ‘They'll come second, but should really be staking a claim for a championship challenge.’
      • ‘It was a nice win and one that we needed if we are to mount a challenge for the play-offs.’
      • ‘Heworth, who were champions in 1998, may mount a realistic challenge in a championship race.’
      • ‘Backup Gus's poor performance showed he wasn't up to the playoff challenge.’
      • ‘Bellamy's pace and skill refreshed a somewhat ageing Newcastle side - their title challenge faltered when he was injured.’
      • ‘They do not have the depth in squad required to proceed in Europe, and at the same time mount anything like a serious challenge on the domestic title at home.’
      • ‘He gave him the stiffest challenge for the title, and he was in fact the only player to remain uneaten till the end.’
      • ‘Trojans turned in a competent performance to brush aside a youthful Northallerton side and keep their title challenge on course.’
      • ‘This is after all the biggest club in the Second City and yet it's 12 years since the team managed a decent challenge for the title.’
      • ‘We need teams like Leeds to make a challenge for the premiership title so we don't see the old same teams winning it year after year’
      • ‘Last season, Leeds made a realistic challenge for the premiership title, this season they are even better!’
      • ‘Although he continued to box, he was unsuccessful in subsequent world title challenges, including one against Evander Holyfield in 1992.’
      • ‘Hatton stresses that he is not looking beyond Rios, who has never been stopped and has twice lost in challenges for world lightweight titles.’
      • ‘Gomersal took advantage of Idle's week off to continue their challenge for the secondary title.’
      • ‘He is looking to steer his new found sensation into the international fold and a possible challenge for a world title next year.’
      • ‘Will fixture congestion caused by The Champions League weaken their league challenge?’
      • ‘Unfortunately, Montoya learnt that too late to save his championship challenge for 2003.’
      • ‘Chelsea seemed a solid defensive unit who might grind their way towards a Championship challenge.’
      • ‘Would Truman State withstand a stiff challenge from rival Drury to win a fifth consecutive team title?’
  • 2An objection or query as to the truth of something, often with an implicit demand for proof.

    ‘a challenge to the legality of the order’
    • ‘Before the court now is the claimant's challenge to both limbs of that decision.’
    • ‘Last September Mr Justice Pitchford rejected their judicial review challenge to the Home Office's stance.’
    • ‘I was thinking by way of challenge to the witnesses who were involved in the theft of the vehicle.’
    • ‘In order to meet some aspects of the challenge to validity the claimants apply to amend the patent in suit to limit the size of the class of compounds claimed.’
    • ‘The manner of resolution of it is one that has been cut off at the pass, as it were, because of the challenge to jurisdiction.’
    • ‘It does put us in a difficult position if in a sense the submissions are going to a de facto challenge to the fiat.’
    • ‘There has been no challenge to the filing of the defence, your Honour.’
    • ‘There was no challenge to that finding in the Full Federal Court.’
    • ‘There has never been any challenge to the correctness of the directions in relation to murder, either in this Court or below.’
    • ‘There is no challenge to the findings of the fact and the appropriate findings are contained in the relevant decision.’
    • ‘At trial there was no challenge to the dating of any of the documents.’
    • ‘There is no serious challenge to the material portions of Larry's evidence.’
    • ‘There is no challenge to this as an accurate record of the way in which the plaintiff mounted the claim for damages.’
    • ‘There has been no challenge to her credibility as a witness, or to her professional competence.’
    • ‘Was there any challenge to the proposition that her fingerprints were on that spray?’
    • ‘Has there ever been a head-on challenge to the constitutional validity of courts martial in Australia?’
    • ‘In paragraph 3 the Tribunal found the facts and there is no challenge to the facts as set out in that paragraph.’
    • ‘Any challenge to the jurisdiction should be pursued before the Commercial Court judge.’
    • ‘But it cannot be elevated into a disguised challenge to the validity of the enforcement notice itself.’
    • ‘There was no challenge to Mr Marsh's account of that lunch.’
    confrontation with, dispute with, stand against, test of, opposition, disagreement with
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1A sentry's call for a password or other proof of identity.
      ‘I heard the challenge “Who goes there?”’
      • ‘Partisan poll workers have been accused of intimidating voters with photographs, heckling, and by challenges to their identity and qualifications.’
      • ‘In order to proceed further, you must answer the sentry's challenge by entering the countersign’
      • ‘The challenge must be made at a distance sufficient to prevent your being rushed by the person being challenged.’
      • ‘Immediately the sentry shouted a challenge to the gunman who responded by raising his weapon to fire at the sentry.’
    2. 2.2Law An objection regarding the eligibility or suitability of a jury member.
      ‘Most of the hearing time was actually occupied by challenges to the jury, as it were, the panel of military officers that are going to hear the case.’
      • ‘The coroner in charge of the inquest is facing a legal challenge to his decision to appoint 12 royal courtiers to the jury’
      • ‘In mounting such a challenge, an attorney argues that based on a person's answers to the lawyer's or the judge's questions, that person has proved himself incapable of carrying out his responsibilities as a juror.’
      • ‘Members of a jury should be selected at random from the panel, subject to any rule of law as to right of challenge by the defence’
      • ‘Either party may challenge any juror either for cause or peremptorily and each party shall have three peremptory challenges.’
  • 3Medicine
    often as modifier The administration of an immunogenic or infectious agent to an animal or person, in order to study the resulting immune response or measure the efficacy of a vaccine.

    ‘challenge trials have yielded positive results when carefully and ethically conducted’
    • ‘human challenge studies occur in tightly controlled settings’
    • ‘recently vaccinated calves should be protected from challenge’
    • ‘The effect of M. habana vaccination on protection against challenge with M. tuberculosis was evaluated.’
    • ‘Acute antigen challenge of the airways can lead to rapid edema and appearance of plasma proteins in the airways.’
    • ‘Both mediators were elevated in patients with asthma after allergen challenge.’
    • ‘All of them have been reported to induce antibodies in mice and provide full or partial protection from live virus challenge.’
    • ‘Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can be studied in the laboratory by allergen inhalation challenge.’

Pronunciation

challenge

/ˈCHalənj/ /ˈtʃæləndʒ/

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Invite (someone) to engage in a contest.

    ‘he challenged one of my men to a duel’
    • ‘organizations challenged the government in by-elections’
    dare, summon, invite, bid, throw down the gauntlet to, defy someone to do something
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Enter into competition with or opposition against.
      • ‘the beauty industry as we know it is being challenged by a group of pioneers hoping to change the way we see our bodies’
      contend, vie, fight, battle, clash, tussle, grapple, wrestle, wrangle, jockey, wage war, cross swords, lock horns, go head to head
      rival, challenge, keep up with, keep pace with, compare with, be the equal of, match up to, match, be on a par with, be in the same class as, be in the same league as, come near to, come close to, touch, approach, approximate, emulate
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Make a rival claim to or threaten someone's hold on (a position)
      • ‘they were challenging his leadership’
    3. 1.3with object and infinitive Invite (someone) to do or say something that one thinks will be difficult or impossible.
      • ‘I challenge the Minister to deny these accusations’
    4. 1.4Make demands on; prove testing to.
      • ‘a new way of life that would challenge them’
      test, tax, try
      View synonyms
  • 2Dispute the truth or validity of.

    • ‘it is possible to challenge the report's assumptions’
    question, disagree with, object to, take exception to, confront, dispute, take issue with, protest against, call into question
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Law Object to (a jury member).
    2. 2.2(of a guard) order (someone) to prove their identity.
      • ‘the watchman did not challenge him’
  • 3Medicine
    Administer an immunogenic or infectious agent to an animal or person, in order to study the resulting immune response or measure the efficacy of a vaccine.

    • ‘the mice were challenged with the influenza virus’

Pronunciation

challenge

/ˈCHalənj/ /ˈtʃæləndʒ/

Origin

Middle English (in the senses ‘accusation’ and ‘accuse’): from Old French chalenge (noun), chalenger (verb), from Latin calumnia ‘calumny’, calumniari ‘calumniate’.