Definition of chronically in English:

chronically

adverb

usually as submodifier
  • 1(in relation to illness) in a persistent and recurring way.

    ‘families dealing with a chronically ill child’
    • ‘There were mounting medical bills for his wife, who was chronically sick.’
    • ‘It's important to know which conditions can mimic psychotic illness but should be treated differently, both acutely and chronically.’
    • ‘Blood pressure can notoriously come on and present itself when persons have strokes or heart attacks as a result of a chronically raised pressure.’
    • ‘They observed chronically infected individuals untreated with anti-retrovirals.’
    • ‘I'm optimistic that I can retrain my chronically contracted muscles and be able to work, run, and have freedom of movement.’
    • ‘Chronically impaired production of vasodilators affects vascular tone.’
    • ‘Patients with idiopathic central sleep apnea will hyperventilate chronically, both awake and asleep.’
    • ‘He is in stable condition after throat surgery and a battle to halt the spread of an inflammation in his chronically ill lungs.’
    • ‘He was diagnosed by Lacan as chronically and incurably insane.’
    1. 1.1In a long-lasting or habitual and problematic way.
      ‘the office is chronically understaffed’
      ‘a mission to create jobs for the chronically unemployed’
      • ‘Broad swathes of the country's industrial heartland are now chronically short of electricity.’
      • ‘We continue to observe pockets of defaults in either chronically or newly ailing industrial sectors.’
      • ‘The law enables companies with chronically underfunded plans to receive an implicit subsidy from companies with sound plans.’
      • ‘A divided union movement created chronically unstable labor relations, to which ship owners responded by making generous concessions.’
      • ‘Her work drew upon her own stifling upbringing and unhappy marriage to a chronically unfaithful husband.’
      • ‘Treaty obligations that restrain capitalist development are chronically ignored.’
      • ‘Community development forums have emerged as a potentially more effective alternative to chronically disappointing government-directed efforts to foster growth.’
      • ‘Some were almost chronically dissatisfied with themselves—however, this was not a sign of personal ambition for fame.’
      • ‘Evidence suggests that youth who are chronically exposed to community violence can become desensitized to its effects.’
      • ‘These chronically bullied children represent an important target group for empirical inquiry and clinical intervention.’
    2. 1.2British informal To a very great extent; extremely.
      ‘chronically stupid drivers’
      ‘she was chronically indecisive’
      • ‘On March 18, the Allies suffered a chronically embarrassing naval disaster.’
      • ‘Being chronically food-aware has warped us to a greater or lesser extent (can anyone have a totally guilt-free helping of tiramisu?).’
      • ‘Of all the women, the most interesting is the chronically grouchy Cristina, "an aggressive little witch," as one patient calls her.’
      • ‘When she gives the chronically spacey Shaun the boot, he indulges in a booze fest at the local pub with his best friend.’
      • ‘He considers these people the "chronically clueless"—so uniquely stupid, in fact, that science may benefit by studying their brains.’
      • ‘One application has been the teaching of good spelling to adults with a long history of being chronically poor spellers.’
      • ‘Most of these "Pulp Fiction" retreads are made by chronically uncool asshats who want to make up for all the wedgies they got in high school.’
      • ‘Don't fall into the trap of blindly defending the budget simply because left-wingers are chronically idiotic about this.’
      • ‘The main storylines follow his turbulent, and pathetic, attempts to escape from his chronically insipid persona.’
      • ‘All of the villagers are chronically dim-witted, including the girl he falls in love with.’

Pronunciation

chronically

/ˈkrɒnɪk(ə)li/