Main definitions of clap in English

: clap1clap2

clap1

See synonyms for clap

Translate clap into Spanish

transitive verbtransitive verb claps, transitive verb clapping, transitive verb clapped

[with object]
  • 1Strike the palms of (one's hands) together repeatedly, typically in order to applaud someone or something.

    ‘Agnes clapped her hands in glee’
    • ‘the crowd was clapping and cheering’
    applaud, clap one's hands, give someone a round of applause, put one's hands together
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    1. 1.1Show approval of (a person or action) by clapping.
      • ‘Louisa clapped his performance’
      applaud, clap one's hands, give someone a round of applause, put one's hands together
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    2. 1.2Strike the palms of (one's hands) together once, especially as a signal.
      • ‘the teacher clapped his hands to restore discipline’
    3. 1.3(of a bird) flap (its wings) audibly.
      • ‘the hawk shook itself and clapped its wings’
      flap, beat, flutter
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  • 2Slap (someone) encouragingly on the back or shoulder.

    • ‘as they parted, he clapped Owen on the back’
    slap, strike, hit, smack, crack, bang, thump, cuff
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    1. 2.1Place (a hand) briefly against or over one's mouth or forehead as a gesture of dismay or regret.
      • ‘he swore and clapped a hand to his forehead’
      slap, strike, hit, smack, crack, bang, thump, cuff
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Pronunciation

clap

/klap/ /klæp/

noun

  • 1An act of striking together the palms of the hands, either once or repeatedly.

    ‘when they stop I give them a clap’
    • ‘there was no crescendo of applause, just a lone volley of claps’
    round of applause, hand, handclap
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    1. 1.1A friendly slap or pat on the back or shoulder.
      ‘Mark gave him a friendly clap on the shoulder, ‘ah, don't worry about it, you'll find out sooner or later right?’’
      • ‘She smiled, giving both of them a friendly clap on the shoulder.’
      • ‘With a clap on the shoulder for me and a kiss for Willow, he went to bed.’
      • ‘There came a hearty clap on my shoulder and I half-turned to come face to face with a ruddy-complexioned bloke about my own age, perhaps a little less.’
      • ‘His heart nearly jumped out of his chest when a hand suddenly descended on his shoulder with a loud clap.’
      • ‘‘This is a gesture done for reassurance and a sort of transfer of strength,’ he said, demonstrating the shoulder clap again.’
      • ‘Ally stood up and gave Brian a clap on the shoulder.’
      • ‘This announcement earned him a smile and a clap on the shoulder before Aurelio began chopping the potatoes into neat little cubes.’
      • ‘With a friendly clap on the back, he sent Josh over to a group of elderly gentlemen, who all happily shook Josh's hand.’
      • ‘Sam snivelled and nodded, earning himself a clap on the shoulder.’
      • ‘He gave me a soft clap on the shoulder, which nearly sent me tumbling to the floor.’
      • ‘As he was about to get to the part of fighting, when he felt a strong clap on the back of his shoulder.’
      • ‘Feeling the claps of a hand on his shoulder Ben turned and could not resist a smile as Jack took out his trademark deck of cards and shuffled it in mid air.’
      • ‘At his age I'd say he deserved a massive clap on the back.’
      • ‘More than the traditional acknowledgement - a clap on the back - which usually went to sponsors in the past.’
      • ‘Those involved would be the first to accept a clap on the back if they had won.’
      • ‘Bill Hogan designed it and he really does deserve a clap on the back.’
      • ‘She smiled, giving both of them a friendly clap on the shoulder.’
      • ‘He gave me a soft clap on the shoulder, which nearly sent me tumbling to the floor.’
      • ‘At his age I'd say he deserved a massive clap on the back.’
      slap, blow, smack, crack, thump, cuff
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  • 2An explosive sound, especially of thunder.

    ‘a clap of thunder echoed through the valley’
    • ‘A loud clap of thunder sounded and rain could be heard pelting against the roof.’
    • ‘‘At the front desk we heard the explosion starting like a clap of thunder and then it kept rolling,’ she said.’
    • ‘Before the two could get on with their innocent, child-like play, however, a loud clap of thunder echoed throughout the skies, which had turned dark from a while ago.’
    • ‘A clap of thunder echoed around, making me jump.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, a clap of thunder roared in their ears, jolting them back into the world of the living.’
    • ‘You'll also love when storms come, because the crashes and claps of thunder and lightning, not to mention the downpour of rain, will be enough to make you want to seek cover for yourself until the tempest subsides.’
    • ‘‘Okay, great,’ I mumbled to my empty room, but the sound of my voice was drowned out by a loud clap of thunder.’
    • ‘Suddenly, there was a loud clap of thunder, followed by a low rumbling that shook the house.’
    • ‘The showers continued on and off all evening and we had some of the loudest claps of thunder we've ever witnessed.’
    • ‘Sometime around 2 a.m. a loud clap of thunder awakened me.’
    • ‘But a mid-afternoon clap of thunder and the presence of dark, rainy skies sent this reporter scurrying for the safety of his car.’
    • ‘Just then there was a deafening clap of thunder.’
    • ‘Eric said: ‘There was a clap of thunder and that was the last I saw of her.’’
    • ‘About three this morning, though, I was woken by heavy rain on the window, quickly followed by a massive clap of thunder as the good weather finally broke.’
    • ‘Five minutes ago I was sitting here and was blinded by a white light which was followed by the loudest clap of thunder I've heard for a few years.’
    • ‘There was a strained silence for a while and then in the distance there was a clap of thunder.’
    • ‘When I got off the train there was a clap of thunder and a flash of lightening.’
    • ‘Just as I was about to power up the mower, there was a clap of thunder and the rain started.’
    • ‘I ran out of the shop and as I did so there was a loud clap of thunder and a flash of lightning.’
    • ‘A second later, the sky is split by lightning that illuminates the hillside, followed by an earsplitting clap.’
    crack, crash, bang, boom
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Pronunciation

clap

/klap/ /klæp/

Phrases

    clap someone in irons
    • Put someone in chains.

      • ‘the ship's captain had the mutineers clapped in irons’
    clap someone in jail
    • Put someone in prison.

      ‘police clapped him in jail for alleged possession of drugs’
      • ‘A cynical immigration official claps James in jail upon his arrival.’
      • ‘He may as well have clapped me in irons and commenced flogging in front of the herds of law-abiding legal visitors.’
      • ‘The dissident has said he aims to run for president against 24-year incumbent, although the president clapped him in jail for a lesser act of defiance only a few years ago.’
      • ‘If you even think about forming a labor union, you'll be clapped in irons.’
      • ‘There are no rehabilitation homes here and the police certainly cannot clap small children in jail just because they ask for money.’
      • ‘The new king was able to clap two members of his father's ageing Council in the Tower before handing them over to the axe.’
      • ‘A group of officers descends on him, reads the arrest warrant, puts a bag over his head, and claps him in cuffs.’
      • ‘The Parliamentarians were clapped in irons and taken away to Oxford to gaol.’

Phrasal Verbs

    clap back
    US informal
    • Respond quickly to critical remarks or unfair treatment.

      • ‘she is not afraid to clap back at the haters when they use homophobic slurs’
      • ‘if you mess with him, he's going to clap back’
      • ‘The actress wasn't afraid to clap back at a now-deleted tweet criticizing her weight.’
      • ‘She clapped back at a fan who accused her of carelessly spending her new boo's money.’
      • ‘The model clapped back stating, 'We are in 2018. We are not in the 1950s.'’
      • ‘He clapped back at body shamers after his girlfriend posted a photo of herself in a bikini.’
      • ‘She could easily clap back, and justly so, but she handles it calmly.’
      • ‘You should know by now, that I will always clap back.’
      • ‘What makes you want to clap back at something instead of ignoring it?’
      • ‘She explained that she finds it "so fun" to clap back at her haters.’
      • ‘Every single time we clap back to our critics, we become stronger.’
      • ‘She saw the tweet and decided to clapback at these girls.’
    clap on
    • clap something on, clap on somethingAbruptly impose a restrictive or punitive measure.

      ‘most countries clapped on tariffs to protect their farmers’
      • ‘Along busy streets, bright signs for Coke, Pepsi, Citibank, Bell South, Papa John's, KFC, Marriott - even Starbucks - could vanish if Peru chose to clap tariffs on those products.’

Origin

Old English clappan ‘throb, beat’, of imitative origin. clap (sense 1 of the verb) dates from late Middle English.

Main definitions of clap in English

: clap1clap2

clap2

See synonyms for clap

Translate clap into Spanish

noun

informal
  • usually the clapA venereal disease, especially gonorrhea.

    • ‘she has given him the clap’
    • ‘he was told he had a mild dose of clap’

Pronunciation

clap

/klap/ /klæp/

Origin

Late 16th century from Old French clapoir ‘venereal bubo’.