Definition of code in English:

code

Pronunciation /kōd/ /koʊd/

See synonyms for code

Translate code into Spanish

noun

  • 1A system of words, letters, figures, or other symbols substituted for other words, letters, etc., especially for the purposes of secrecy.

    ‘the Americans cracked their diplomatic code’
    • ‘sending messages in code’
    • ‘The spread of mobile telephones and even the use of secret words or codes show that secrecy is essential to close deals or pass on information.’
    • ‘She played a key role in the recruitment and briefing of agents, and became an expert writer of letters in code.’
    • ‘These include the letters, written in code, which are said to make clear she was in favour of inflicting pain on her enemies.’
    • ‘I often figured out codes long before the characters did, which was annoying.’
    • ‘He is writing letters in code, there would be no reason for that unless he had something to hide.’
    • ‘It was in her language, it was just a different code to the written words.’
    • ‘Codes and great historical figures go together like the author of a certain fantastical thriller involving Leonardo da Vinci has shown.’
    • ‘She turned and began again to figure the codes, and another plan to get out of this cellar.’
    • ‘We are still trying to figure out what the codes mean, but we feel we are very close to cracking it.’
    • ‘She rubbed her temple, trying to figure out the code before her, when she heard a knock at the door.’
    • ‘After Evan figures out the code to a mysterious paper that Lisa picks up, they head towards mayhem.’
    • ‘If he gave us accurate predictions of the future as a reward for figuring out the code, we are to believe he expects us not to use it to our advantage?’
    • ‘They were the high-level diplomatic and military codes, the kind of which had never been cracked.’
    • ‘Some of the neoconservatives in the Pentagon had let it slip to him that they had broken the country's diplomatic codes.’
    • ‘The most well-known example is the breaking of the Japanese diplomatic and military codes before and during WWII.’
    • ‘The code is given in figure 1a, and an example conversion is shown in figure 1b.’
    • ‘He eventually figures out the code when he absent-mindedly reads the general's doodling on a pad.’
    • ‘And if they can break the code on even one message, we're sunk.’
    • ‘Cryptography is the enciphering and deciphering of messages in secret code or cipher.’
    • ‘Alongside the body are a series of baffling codes, which Langdon is asked to decipher.’
    cipher, secret language, secret writing, set of symbols, key, hieroglyphics
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A system of signals, such as sounds, light flashes, or flags, used to send messages.
      ‘Morse code’
      • ‘The other's light code flashed angrily as its drive signature fluctuated.’
      • ‘In similar fashion, the female glowworm uses the male glowworm light code to signal him.’
      • ‘Aircraft not sending out the code might well be shot down as the enemy.’
      • ‘It's thought that the transmissions are used to send code to agents in the field, who then decode the message to receive instructions or whatever.’
      • ‘The ring around the fighter's light code turned deep orange, and then dangerously crimson.’
      • ‘This phonetic code could express every sound in the English language distinctly.’
      • ‘He tapped his foot on the ground several times, creating some sort of code with the sound.’
      • ‘Sticking my radio back on I prepare to send out a distress code to my comrades in Halsanath.’
      • ‘The dizzying, chattering noises wove a linguistic web that sounded more like code than speech.’
      • ‘At first, the US military had exclusive use of GPS through a secret signal and an encrypted code.’
      • ‘The pen converts the code into a frequency-modulated signal that is input to the microphone socket on a PC, or to any other digital device.’
      • ‘Over time, by developing our own code using hand signals, we became good friends.’
      • ‘They will wear new epaulettes from which all references to ‘special constable’ have been removed and replaced by a code identifiable only by other members of the force.’
    2. 1.2A series of letters, numbers, or symbols assigned to something for the purposes of classification or identification.
      ‘the genetic code’
      • ‘calls with either code will work in the 201 area’
      • ‘We are seeing boats coming in from all over the world with manufacturer identification codes assigned by their country of origin.’
      • ‘Currently, companies are the smallest army element to be routinely assigned unit identification codes.’
      • ‘The officer turned to face a terminal, inserting an identicard and entering a series of codes.’
      • ‘Responses were recorded, assigned a letter code, and calculated using frequencies and percentages.’
      • ‘Biometric identifiers are digital codes that cannot be used to reconstitute your image or fingerprint.’
      • ‘The first two letters represent a regional code, the two numbers represent the year and the last three letters are random.’
      • ‘They are commonly represented by a single letter code where the index represents the absorption maximum.’
      • ‘Not only had I managed to follow the guard I even figured out what the code was.’
      • ‘They never got to the end, though, because they never figured out the last code to open the 7 gates.’
      • ‘An e-voter would go to one site to register and would then be issued with the pass codes to vote in secrecy at another site.’
      • ‘With a pre-assigned code, you can send documents to a queue, then access them for printing at any time, such as at hotel and airport business centers.’
      • ‘The magazine sent us the access code to view its upcoming issue, which I believe will hit the news-stands on Tuesday.’
      • ‘If approved, the server sends back an activation code.’
      • ‘The next second, I punch in the code to check my messages.’
      • ‘The machine beeped in recognition of the code and the numbers flashed momentarily across the screen.’
      • ‘The scientist nimbly punched a short combo and a green light acknowledged a correct code.’
      • ‘Games are activated by sending an access code to the company with an Internet connection.’
      • ‘The man rapidly typed a code into a security system and a loud buzzing sound signaled the door's release.’
      • ‘I registered with them today and apparently it takes 7 days for them to send through the activation code.’
      • ‘I picked up the phone, punching in the code to hear our messages.’
  • 2Computing
    Program instructions.

    ‘assembly code’
    • ‘hundreds of lines of code’
    • ‘The code then downloads spyware programs to surfers' PCs, including one that steals credit card numbers and other forms of financial information.’
    • ‘The answer is 609,000 and this is the number of lines of code in the software for the computers and avionics systems.’
    • ‘Using this drag-and-drop methodology, users can create program code with minimal user input or understanding.’
    • ‘We had to program in assembly code and call a play routine every vertical blank.’
    • ‘Early programmers worked in native computer code or machine language.’
    • ‘If the malware inside this ZIP file is opened, the Trojan may attempt to download more malicious code from a pre-programmed list of websites.’
    • ‘Errors from programming code and malformed html can keep the search engine robots from indexing your web pages.’
    • ‘Hackers gain secret control of the computers by sending e-mail viruses and worms or by planting software code on web sites.’
    • ‘Millions of lines of software code are involved, and we haven't even gotten to matters like billing and maintenance.’
    • ‘It allows Delphi and C++ programmers to compile code to either operating system.’
    • ‘He adds that progress on debugging code is a tad slow, pointing to threads you can find on this bulletin board.’
    • ‘They could access the underlying code and tweak the program at will.’
    • ‘The trick, of course, would be inserting the rogue code into the host program in the first place.’
    • ‘Indeed if ever there was a case for the open sourcing of program code then this is it.’
    • ‘Wait a minute, I'm a software engineer… why not look at their code and try to figure out some of their major weaknesses.’
    • ‘Nobody studies the old code, and nobody figures out where it is inefficient and why, and as a consequence programs are often buggy and less stable.’
    • ‘Once infected with the code, the computer sends the same message to other contacts in the instant-messenger list.’
    • ‘He encouraged people to look at his program and modify it for their own needs and to send him their code to add to the system.’
    • ‘This time it was traced to a college student in Romania who had also left obvious clues to his identity in the code.’
    • ‘This is the process that analyzes an HTML document in comparison to standard HTML rules, identifying errors and non-standard codes.’
  • 3A systematic collection of laws or regulations.

    ‘the criminal code’
    • ‘Under the doctrine of breach of statutory duty some regulatory codes may give rise to civil liability when breached.’
    • ‘This is itself a judicial interpolation into the statutory code.’
    • ‘The penal code does not criminalize such conduct, and would be clearly unconstitutional if it did.’
    • ‘It would be perfectly possible for a criminal code to provide separate crimes of negligence, with lower maximum sentences, at appropriate points in the hierarchy of offences.’
    • ‘He submitted that implementation of planning permissions was not dealt with by the statutory code.’
    • ‘In many states, there is a criminal code which tabulates criminal offences.’
    • ‘With the growing power of the state, statutory tenure codes were drawn up by centralized governments, reflecting the values and interests of the state.’
    • ‘Influenced by popular discontent with much of the judiciary, Napoleon attempted to write a statutory code that was essentially judge-proof.’
    • ‘Civil law and commercial law derive from the French, while the penal code is influenced by the British model.’
    • ‘Dissidence, even active, is not war and the normal criminal and civil codes of law still apply.’
    • ‘The constitution, the penal code, and international and human rights conventions are the only guide to what is acceptable and what is not.’
    • ‘You look and see what principles have been established in prior cases rather than just referring to a piece of legislation or a code.’
    • ‘Despite the stark words of the various codes regulating ministerial and MSP conduct, the MSPs of various parties will let the First Minister off.’
    • ‘When he put up a tricolour atop his factory, the police slapped a case on him for violating the flag code.’
    • ‘The difficult concept of ‘adverse possession’ of private property appears in both codes in a nearly identical manner.’
    • ‘Under the old code, mothers were assigned priority in matters of child custody, and fathers were granted visiting rights.’
    • ‘The Muslim minority views the code as an indirect abrogation of their cultural freedom.’
    • ‘In Warwick, only 75 miles away, these activities are all deemed acceptable farming uses under the zoning code.’
    • ‘With compliance to building codes a given, the real question on many projects is whether it is worthwhile to go beyond code requirements.’
    • ‘In order to conform to strict fire codes the employer shall have the right to conduct safety inspections and fire drills at the employees home at any time.’
    law, laws, body of law, rules, regulations, constitution, system, charter, canon, jurisprudence
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1A set of conventions governing behavior or activity in a particular sphere.
      ‘a dress code’
      • ‘There is no written code of conduct for these venues, although each one will have a slightly different unwritten code of behavior.’
      • ‘There is no supreme code of behavior that dictates who I have to be nice to.’
      • ‘The prejudging judgment might be as broad as the spoken English language, or the dictionary, or some other code or convention.’
      • ‘There's no formal code of behavior, at least none I've been able to fathom.’
      • ‘They believe these activities may violate their code of conduct and bring shame upon them.’
      • ‘But these are not the sort of thing that a good company man does; a remarkably effective code bans such behavior.’
      • ‘In fact, among surfers there's a fairly rigid code of beach behavior, which includes a strict pecking order.’
      • ‘This is so profoundly a part of the military code of behavior that it cannot be over-emphasized.’
      • ‘Instead, the real issue is getting golf's expanding legions of fans to adhere to a time-honored code of behavior.’
      • ‘Sir, my research indicates that there is no code of dress prescribed or agreed upon for attorneys appearing in the magistrates court.’
      • ‘A 13-point code of conduct governing all buskers working in Oxford is expected to come into force next month.’
      • ‘The Government has laid out its ideas for a proposed voluntary code to govern how communication firms handle calls, e-mails and web access.’
      • ‘The ombudsman criticised the school for breaking strict admissions rules set out in the code of practice on comprehensive admissions.’
      • ‘Does this country possess the courage to affirm a common code of principles, of manners?’
      • ‘I was one of two writers invited by the commission on culture and sport to help an ad hoc committee put into words a new code of practice.’
      • ‘Utmost secrecy was the dictator's code of practice and few witnesses survived to testify about his daily life.’
      • ‘Edwards said the code of conduct was sent to parents as a matter of course and was unrelated to Wednesday's match.’
      • ‘There are already many accepted codes of practice for magick but they weren't formulated with modern modes of communication in mind.’
      • ‘The authorities obviously want to continue to maintain the code of secrecy of all the corruption perpetrated.’
      • ‘While a code of secrecy applies, there also exists a pool of top homeowners willing to sell their properties if the price is right, even though they are not on the market.’
      set of principles, set of standards, set of customs
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2A set of rules and standards adhered to by a society, class, or individual.
      • ‘a stern code of honor’

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Convert (the words of a message) into a particular code in order to convey a secret meaning.

    ‘only Mitch knew how to read the message—even the name was coded’
    • ‘Thus the hats contain a message coded in the manner in which they are worn.’
    • ‘The package enables audio traffic - such as a phone conversation - to be coded as data, sent down an internet connection and then decoded at the other end.’
    • ‘Given that the messages are claimed to be coded, it would seem that network editing is unlikely to pick them out.’
    • ‘Places carry meanings and are coded with narrative significances, and these built-in values are useful to writers.’
    • ‘It is an awareness of how language codes the way we view the world, and how membership in various communities influences our understanding of the world.’
    • ‘Three-fourths of the message has already been deciphered, but the remaining fourth has apparently been coded in an entirely different way.’
    • ‘But markets only respond to messages coded in the language of prices.’
    • ‘Sometimes the information she communicates is coded or covert - where exactly the missing animal may be found, for instance.’
    • ‘Not only may they be purposely babbling and coding their conversations to confuse the eavesdroppers, but there are also the complexities of language itself.’
    • ‘There were little clues, like the fact that messages often started with a weather report, or the fact that Enigma never ever coded a given letter as itself.’
    1. 1.1Express the meaning of (a statement or communication) in an indirect or euphemistic way.
      ‘they code their language when talking to the general public’
      • ‘This visual narrative appears to have incorporated other animal stories as well as interjected some coded political statements.’
      • ‘He has removed any potential threat of even coded criticism from the foreign secretary by removing him from his post.’
      • ‘So any seasoned interpreter immediately understood that ‘Curriculum for Excellence’ was coded language for tat and dumbing-down.’
      • ‘This minority group has long been coded in U.S. popular culture as a threat, a people who keep their motives and means well hidden.’
      • ‘Unchallenged, mainstream film coded the erotic into the language of the dominant patriarchal order.’
      • ‘Enigmatic, coded, complicated, the film is a distinctive commentary on art, race, gender and nationalities.’
      • ‘On the back of this page are the directions to it, coded as a precaution.’
      • ‘How is a reader supposed to understand what an article is actually about if everything is all coded and coy?’
      • ‘The Singaporean filmmaker argues that he's only amplifying what's already coded into the fable.’
      • ‘Petroleum wealth seems often to be coded as undeserved and also as automatically making people rich.’
      • ‘But then, as he says of himself, he must be coded an optimist.’
      • ‘His private perspective on public space, though highly subjective, is not coded with any personal information.’
      • ‘In a curious move, bombing the country is coded as a greater humanitarian good than feeding or educating people.’
      • ‘It is also one of the reasons why music is coded, and the political purposes of the musicians do not necessarily coincide with the political sentiments expressed in the lyrics.’
      • ‘There were hints about social security reform and coded signals about moving to a flat tax, but this speech, like this convention, was a war speech.’
    2. 1.2Assign a code to (something) for purposes of classification, analysis, or identification.
      ‘she coded the samples and sent them down for dissection’
      • ‘Instruments were coded with an identification number to track and follow up with non respondents.’
      • ‘All sections were coded to prevent identification of the probe type or setting used.’
      • ‘Type and severity of maltreatment were coded using the maltreatment classification system developed by Barnett et al.’
      • ‘The samples were coded so that the identity of the individual was not known to the person carrying out the tests.’
      • ‘Response envelopes were coded with the hospital identification number to protect confidentiality.’
      • ‘If you code your medicines, be sure these identifications are included on any medicine record you use.’
      • ‘A nurse brought us a large number of test tubes, each one coded with a secret number so that we could not tell which contained fructose and which contained glucose.’
      • ‘Similarly, alcohol-related words were coded as 1 and nonalcohol words coded as 0.’
      • ‘All audit observations should be coded by type and significance, and all audits catalogued by scope and quality.’
      • ‘A person named Nguyen O'Brien will be coded Vietnamese, not Irish.’
      • ‘The athlete watches the official seal both bottles, which are coded with a number rather than a name.’
      • ‘Prior to coding, the names of speakers were removed (as were explicit references to the names of the parties themselves).’
      • ‘Paintings will be coded with serial numbers and will come with a receipt to prove authenticity.’
      • ‘Behaviors and conversation were noted and were coded by using the theoretical framework of enduring and suffering and comforting.’
      • ‘Documents show that this money appears to have been on deposit in the account, coded A / A40.’
      • ‘The transcribed statements were coded according to general themes that emerged.’
      • ‘They were also taperecorded, but were not transcribed for analysis since interviewers coded respondents' answers to all questions during the interview.’
      • ‘Each source quoted or paraphrased was coded separately, and all of a source's statements in an article were taken into account when applying coding categories.’
      • ‘For each question, those students that replied affirmatively were coded with the value 1.’
      • ‘Questionnaires were anonymous, coded by a unique number rather than by name.’
  • 2Write code for (a computer program)

    ‘most developers code C + + like C’
    • ‘I no longer actively code in PHP’
    • ‘When we code a computer program, we do not rewrite the entire thing every time something fails to work.’
    • ‘When you think of high technology, you probably imagine a software engineer sitting behind a computer, coding some new program.’
    • ‘I didn't find it a difficult exam, but then I've been coding Windows Forms since Visual Basic 4 back in 1997.’
    • ‘New software for the state health care authority is being coded in part in India.’
    • ‘Today while working on a design for a small project I'm doing, I coded a JavaScript image rollover for the first time in at least a year, maybe two.’
  • 3code forBiochemistry
    no object Specify the genetic sequence for (an amino acid or protein)

    ‘genes that code for human growth hormone’
    • ‘This gene codes for a protein which is 513 amino acids in length.’
    • ‘Because of their possibly unusual evolution, genes coding for ribosomal proteins were excluded from the analysis.’
    • ‘Mutations in genes coding for these proteins may be tolerated in an otherwise wild-type cell through the presence of one or more checkpoint pathways.’
    • ‘Several members of this group were found to contain a gene lying downstream of the YR gene that codes for a protein of unknown function.’
    • ‘Each gene, or a combination of genes, codes for the assembly of amino acids that combine in long chains forming proteins.’
    1. 3.1Be the genetic determiner of (a characteristic)
      ‘one pair of homologous chromosomes codes for eye color’
      • ‘The population will have ‘responded’ and become ‘adapted,’ but only because the genetic information coding for waxier cuticles and deeper roots was already present.’
      • ‘The loss of eye function is the result of a ‘downhill’ mutational change, a corruption or loss of the genetic information coding for eye manufacture.’
      • ‘It had nothing to do with demonstrating how the genetic information coding for feathers could have arisen in the imagined reptilian ancestors of birds.’
      • ‘Applying these principles to the horse, the genetic information coding for extra toes is present, but is switched off in most modern horses.’
      • ‘Data from animals suggest that the portion of the genome coding for reproduction-related function may be unusually dynamic.’

Phrases

    bring something up to code
    North American
    • Renovate or update an old building in line with the latest building regulations.

      ‘the wiring will be brought up to code’
      • ‘In 1905, the architect bought the building on Orchard Street and included these improvements when he brought it up to code.’
      • ‘The gallery, which was formerly a storefront, had to undergo a few building improvements to bring it up to code.’
      • ‘Workers replaced the windows, cleaned the brick and brought the building up to code with ramps and elevators.’
      • ‘He warns that bringing the building up to code would be ‘extravagantly expensive.’’
      • ‘The company then told her that she would have to use its contractors to bring the building up to code.’
      • ‘You will probably have to bring the home up to code if you undertake a remodeling.’
      • ‘Right now, many wood stove manufacturers don't want to invest the $50,000 extra it would take to bring their product up to code.’
      • ‘We didn't have to bring the bathrooms up to code and compliance because we didn't change the existing structure; instead, we cosmetically cleaned them up.’
      • ‘If your older deck was built this way, bring it up to code.’
      • ‘He also said it would cost at least $5000 either to remove the addition or to bring it up to code.’

Origin

Middle English via Old French from Latin codex, codic- (see codex). The term originally denoted a systematic collection of statutes made by Justinian or another of the later Roman emperors; compare with code (sense 3 of the noun) (mid 18th century), the earliest modern sense.