Main definitions of colt in English

: colt1Colt2

colt1

Pronunciation /kōlt/ /koʊlt/

Translate colt into Spanish

noun

  • A young uncastrated male horse, in particular one less than four years old.

    ‘The total number of horses - 2,668 colts, 2,440 fillies, and two geldings - is 219 more than last year's previous record of 4,891.’
    • ‘The card is highlighted by a pair of stakes of $75,000 stakes for older fillies and mares and for older colts and geldings.’
    • ‘I thought her performance was excellent, better than anything she had achieved before, since she was taking on colts and older horses for the first time.’
    • ‘Most times he was starting colts and fixing problem horses, inevitably winding up being the resident horse guy.’
    • ‘I hated this time of year as the young colts or filly used to be brought to the forge to have something done to their feet.’
    • ‘The colt began picking off horses but soon ran out of running room on the inside.’
    • ‘For example, a young colt will turn to put his primary line in line with yours and he'll raise his head to grow taller and get a good look.’
    • ‘The colt, now aged four, has embarked on what is already a successful stud career.’
    • ‘She pressed her hand against the forehead of a young colt, which whinnied in surprise and delight.’
    • ‘The brood mare section has classes for sport horses, filly and colts, foals, Irish Draught mares, Irish Draught filly foal qualifiers and Irish Sport horse foal qualifier.’
    • ‘We always wanted young horses but we never had any colts before, so we started getting into it.’
    • ‘My fondest memory at our farm was watching my brother training the young colts in the paddock in the summer days while I sat on the fence nearby.’
    • ‘The colt reared and began galloping when other horses breezed past him.’
    • ‘The allotment includes 12 fillies and eight colts, many with ties to American racing.’
    • ‘Any colt or filly who wins a Classic is likely to be much sought after as a stallion or brood mare.’
    • ‘He changes the notion of kingship by riding on a colt rather than a horse.’
    • ‘I visited her whenever I was able, and helped deliver her foals, splendid colts and fillies, who, in their own careers, bore the greatest soldiers of the age on their mightiest campaigns.’
    • ‘Recently, a young colt died as a direct result of eating grass cuttings discarded in his field.’
    • ‘Two colts brought the joint highest price for a male on the day of $525,000.’
    • ‘Male colts become reproductively active at approximately five years.’

Origin

Old English; perhaps related to Swedish kult, applied to boys or half-grown animals.

Main definitions of Colt in English

: colt1Colt2

Colt2

Pronunciation /kōlt/ /koʊlt/

Translate Colt into Spanish

noun

Trademark
  • A type of revolver.

    ‘The problem is found in discerning which Colts are black powder guns and which are smokeless.’
    • ‘I always had the feeling the flintlock had a much slower lock time than the Colt cap and ball revolver.’
    • ‘The sheriff had a shotgun in one hand and a Colt revolver in the other.’
    • ‘It resembles many of the English revolvers more closely than the Colts and Remingtons.’
    • ‘The US forces retained the Colt automatic which had been in use since 1911.’

Origin

Mid 19th century from the name of the US inventor and firearms manufacturer Samuel Colt (1814–62).