Main definitions of commune in English

: commune1commune2

commune1

Pronunciation /ˈkämyo͞on/ /ˈkɑmjun/

See synonyms for commune

Translate commune into Spanish

noun

  • 1A group of people living together and sharing possessions and responsibilities.

    ‘she went to California and joined a commune’
    • ‘Setting up communes, where senior citizens can live together with well-provided support structures that they might require from time to time is a good idea.’
    • ‘I lived with various communes of people in share houses, or on shared land, I lived in tepees, in cars, in tents, in a bedroll.’
    • ‘I thought it would be neat to live in a peaceful commune and promote world togetherness.’
    • ‘Some of the communes allowed anyone to join, which seemed at first glance like a good thing.’
    • ‘Chilled through, Nathan rolled himself up in his blanket on the sofa where he's slept since joining the commune, & is already snoring.’
    • ‘One of the residents of the Together household invites his sister and her two young children to come and join the commune.’
    • ‘I deeply respect you and your goals, both of bringing a spiritual dimension back into people's lives, and to create this commune in which people share ideas and resources.’
    • ‘We formed a commune, to share our wallets, share our tools, share our ideas, share our love, play music.’
    • ‘It is a close knit community, like a big commune but everyone is family.’
    • ‘In and out of those communes drifted many of the nameless and faceless, joined in their search for ‘where it was all at’ before moving on.’
    • ‘How was your commune formed, and what kinds of people joined it?’
    • ‘Of course, my generation did eventually return to the city - disillusioned with communes and free love.’
    • ‘She wanted to go back to the commune in the morning and spend time with the artists.’
    • ‘After all, sometimes we would play for the camp officers and their families, who lived at the camps in beautiful communes right outside the gates.’
    • ‘I once worked with a fellow who lived in a Christian commune.’
    • ‘The commune thus benefited from the collective effect of this renewal effort.’
    • ‘Equally as important, peasants were declared the legal owners of their plots of land within the framework of their commune.’
    • ‘In 1975 Stockholm, a woman flees her abusive drunk husband with her two kids, and goes to the small socialist commune run by her younger brother.’
    • ‘It was some sort of commune though not necessarily the communist nor hippie type.’
    • ‘He and some friends formed a type of hippy commune, living off the land organically and working with nature.’
    collective, cooperative, co-op, community, communal settlement, kibbutz, fellowship
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A communal settlement in a communist country.
      ‘we all went out of Beijing by bus to spend a morning at a commune’
      • ‘Peasants at home identified themselves in terms of their membership in the village commune and as Orthodox believers.’
      • ‘Many peasants were forced to work for the state as a part of a collective commune.’
      • ‘It started about 20 years ago, shortly after Beijing began testing the waters of market reform by dismantling people's communes and giving individuals the incentive to create their own wealth.’
      • ‘Further south in Argentina, state governance has ground to a halt, and people are organising into small local communes not unlike those workers' co-operatives seen on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War.’
      • ‘They saw in the Russian commune the possibility of a direct transition from a precapitalist mode of production to socialism.’
      • ‘Anyone who wants to can, in a free society, even join a voluntary commune, like Brook Farm, or an Israeli kibbutz, and lead as blissfully communistic a life as he or she wishes.’
      • ‘In some parts of the country zealous Chinese Communists tried to establish rural communes, as was happening in China.’
      • ‘The Slavophiles saw this in action in the peasant communes, and believed that communalism in conjunction with Christian communal worship would become the source of Russia's sorely needed moral and cultural regeneration.’
      • ‘For example, before collectivization there were currents among the peasants which supported cooperatives or agricultural communes and community-based cultivation.’
      • ‘They pointed to the peasant commune as the cell of the new communist society.’
      • ‘In this, Lenin was more Marxist than Marx, who had observed the revolutionary potential of the Russian peasant commune in the 1870s.’
      • ‘One such was the Swiss commune, which, under Lenin's instigation, was organized by Fritz Platten, a friend of mine.’
      • ‘A mother and her children in a farming commune in Canton.’
  • 2The smallest French territorial division for administrative purposes.

    ‘very few of the abbey's vineyards were actually located within the commune of Hautvillers’
    • ‘Monaco has borders with several communes of the French Department of the Alpes-Maritimes.’
    • ‘The commune is the smallest administrative level.’
    • ‘Wines made from grapes grown within the commune of Pupillin have the right to the appellation Arbois Pupillin.’
    • ‘The administrative district or commune embodies a sense of community and self-identification for its residents.’
    • ‘Located on the southern border of the La Morra commune, part of the vineyard is located in the neighboring commune of Barolo.’
    • ‘In all 26 villages have their own appellation, and there are two Grands Crus: Dézaley in the commune of Puidoux and Calamin in the commune of Epesses.’
    • ‘It is divided into departments that are subdivided into arrondissements, communes, commune sectionals, and habitations.’
    • ‘He made his first journey to Paris in 1830 to work for his uncle, then moved to the same lodgings used by his father in his youth, and shared a room with a dozen migrants from his native commune.’
    • ‘Although Rasteau is the chosen name for this variable drink, the grapes may be grown anywhere in the communes of three Côtes-du-Rhône villages: Rasteau, Cairanne, and Sablet.’
    • ‘It was not until 1966 that the Cotes Du Rhone Villages appellation was finally established producing wines from 16 individual communes.’
    • ‘These regions are further subdivided into arrondissements, then into communes or townships.’
    • ‘Each commune in France generally holds a town festival during the year.’
    • ‘There are municipal and national police as well as gendarmeries in each commune.’
    1. 2.1A territorial division similar to a French commune in other countries.
      ‘In other communes a two-thirds majority vote could enforce consolidations for the whole village.’
      • ‘In Spain in 1857, and in Italy in 1859, education laws imposed on communes the obligation to provide elementary schools, and on parents the obligation to send their children there for at least two or three years.’
      • ‘At the beginning of the Second World War 45 per cent of the population lived in rural communes, defined as having fewer than 2,000 inhabitants.’
      • ‘There are a little over 36,000 communes, and their populations can range in size from under one thousand to that of a large city.’
      • ‘The Feb.3 polls for Cambodia's 1,621 communes will be the country's first direct communal elections.’
      • ‘They dominated the countryside, perverted justice, and subverted the rights of the towns and rural communes.’
      • ‘These in turn were subdivided into districts and communes, all run by elected councils and officials.’
      • ‘In 1975 she was pushed out of the city to Kandal province, then to a commune in Pursat province.’
      • ‘This Italian commune in the province of Bologna had a population in 1944 of 4,200 of whom 650 lived in the main town.’
      • ‘The important units of community government are the commune and subcommunes (districts).’
      • ‘It was organized as a commune in 1052 but was still part of the Kingdom of Italy.’
      • ‘The 40,000 new communes, usually the same as the old parishes, served as the base for a nested hierarchy of cantons, districts, and eighty-three departments.’
      • ‘Rural islands were designated communes with their own municipal budgets for public works and education and their own elected mayors.’
      • ‘But they were not salaried by the state and minimally, if at all, by the commune or parish.’
  • 3the CommuneThe group that seized the municipal government of Paris in the French Revolution and played a leading part in the Reign of Terror until suppressed in 1794.

    1. 3.1The municipal government organized on communalistic principles elected in Paris in 1871. It was soon brutally suppressed by government troops.
      ‘This was followed by the declaration of a Paris Commune, or independent municipal government, in March 1871, an event which recalled the extremism of the French Revolution.’
      • ‘The director, one gathers, wants a Paris Commune purified of all its difficult and perhaps unpleasant associations, a kind of utopian model to hold out to today's radical protesters.’
      • ‘The Paris Commune developed spontaneously from the process of class struggle: the need for a new political form arose and the commune was created to address it.’
      • ‘The Paris Commune was really a radical Republican rebellion, not a socialist one.’

Origin

Late 17th century (in commune (sense 2)): from French, from medieval Latin communia, neuter plural of Latin communis (see common).

Main definitions of commune in English

: commune1commune2

commune2

Pronunciation /kəˈmyo͞on/ /kəˈmjun/

See synonyms for commune

Translate commune into Spanish

intransitive verb

[no object]commune with
  • 1Share one's intimate thoughts or feelings with (someone), especially on a spiritual level.

    • ‘the purpose of praying is to commune with God’
    communicate, speak, talk, converse, have a tête-à-tête, confer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Feel in close spiritual contact with.
      • ‘he spent an hour communing with nature on the bank of a stream’
      empathize, have a rapport, feel in close touch
      View synonyms
  • 2US Receive Holy Communion.

Origin

Middle English from Old French comuner ‘to share’, from comun (see common).