Definition of confessional in English:

confessional

noun

  • 1An enclosed stall in a church divided by a screen or curtain in which a priest sits to hear confessions.

    ‘the secrets of the confessional’
    • ‘And there were a good many other sequences planned for the picture which are not there, including her visit to a confessional in the Catholic church - without words, nothing was ever said.’
    • ‘‘I came here for meaning,’ Gavin says to the priest in the confessional.’
    • ‘The priest will then assign a ‘penance’, which usually consists of a few prayers to say in the church after leaving the confessional.’
    • ‘I'm going to have to spend a year in the confessional at church after all this is over.’
    • ‘The play then shifts to a church confessional where the geek is talking about the sniffing incident, about how it was a sinful display but arousing nonetheless.’
    • ‘And it is true that a priest has a rebuttable presumption against revealing in court what he has heard in the confessional.’
    • ‘Repenting sinners may find relief in an item being auctioned on the Internet by a Vienna church - a cherry-wood confessional.’
    • ‘They're right beside churches with drive-through confessionals.’
    • ‘Such people appear to have no conception of why the Church has confessionals or the Seal.’
    • ‘His film springs from a US culture steeped in acts of catharsis, where the therapist's couch has usurped the church confessional, and in its turn it has been eclipsed by the public exorcisms of the chat show.’
    • ‘Canada, said the news agency, was advancing a plan that would deny clergy the right to refuse testimony on anything they heard in the confessional.’
    • ‘After a brief opening prayer, parents line up with their children, presenting them to one of the waiting priests, seated not inside confessionals but on chairs scattered throughout the church.’
    • ‘Not a very large structure, the church was more of a chapel - bearing only five rows of pews, a small confessional, and an altar below a crucifix.’
    • ‘Among American Catholics, the collapse of church discipline is symbolized by empty confessionals and more than $1 billion in settlements for clergy sexual abuses.’
    • ‘In some dioceses, priests were expected to preach on the subject at least once a year, and it was not unusual for priests to raise the issue of contraception in the confessional.’
    • ‘The priest is an icon of Christ and acts in persona Christi at the altar and in the confessional.’
    • ‘Consequently, the screenplay has him paying frequent visits to a confessional.’
    • ‘This latter, partly the result of the rise of therapy and the women's movement, naturally means that fewer people feel the pressure to tell which swelled nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century confessionals.’
    • ‘Old-fashioned confessionals having been tossed out long ago, the rule is that ‘reconciliation rooms’ must have a clear window with somebody posted outside to keep an eye on things.’
    • ‘From the altar area worshipers may access the ambulatory as it extends along the north side of the structure, where the confessionals are located.’
  • 2An acknowledgement that one has done something shameful or embarrassing; a confession.

    ‘tabloid confessionals’
    • ‘His lyrics read like tabloid confessionals, offering glimpses into a celebrity's life.’
    • ‘In these days of tabloid confessionals and celebrity magazines, the sound of rock stars complaining about their lot has become a familiar one.’
    • ‘It seals its fate with private camera confessionals, team challenges, and the mandatory hot tub (why must there always be a hot tub?).’
    • ‘Hearing these confessionals was a thrill akin to skimming Lady Macbeth's diary or getting drunk with Machiavelli.’
    • ‘‘I want to hear a love confessional,’ he said before realizing he was saying it.’
    • ‘He stopped embracing jealousy not wanting to hear a maudlin confessional in the hallway outside the lavatories.’
    • ‘If I wanted to hear confessionals about someone's sad youth, I'd go read some freshman poetry, or read any of the innumerable sob story memoirs that populate bookshelves and which we all pretty much agreed suck, I think.’
    • ‘But I would suspect that this is one of those first person confessionals secretly disguised as a generalization-laden argument.’
    • ‘It's a little disconcerting hearing the wide-eyed troubadour so distraught, but if it's any consolation, the emotional intensity of his folksy confessionals and heartfelt power-pop nuggets have been jacked up considerably.’
    • ‘On-camera confessionals narrate already obvious conflicts with either eye-rolling sarcasm or lip-quivering sincerity.’
    • ‘The subject matter is still that of broken relationships but, whereas before the sense was of an unremitting resignation, now a lighter note leavens the confessionals.’
    • ‘In this time of tell-all public confessionals, I'm coming clean about my own coming-of-age, as it were.’
    • ‘My stateside imagination ran more cheaply toward TV reality programs and talk-show confessionals.’
    • ‘This sophomore effort features 10 romantic confessionals composed mostly on acoustic guitar and piano.’
    • ‘The books, like their women's-mag forerunners, are a string of outrageous confessionals from women in the grips of dating crises.’
    • ‘Yes, there is the standard tawdry bedroom balderdash that sells most tell-all cinematic confessionals.’
    • ‘While such toe-curling confessionals may grate with some, they nonetheless fill its forty-five minutes with a world-weary warmth and idealism to match the boundary-breaking beats.’
    • ‘This is her most personal record, both in that she's had more to do with the music than ever before, and also that it continues with her apparent desire to write songs as confessionals.’
    • ‘It is largely due to her polished prose that the books rise above the level of confessionals.’

adjective

  • 1(of speech or writing) in which a person reveals private thoughts or admits to past incidents, especially ones about which they feel ashamed or embarrassed.

    ‘the autobiography is remarkably confessional’
    ‘his confessional outpourings’
    • ‘Anyhow, it's not a surprise that so many of the examples of this kind are in confessional writing about relationship problems.’
    • ‘By confusing the public and the private, today's confessional culture undermines the idea of the ‘public interest’.’
    • ‘And the evidence of that confession, or confessional statement, was admitted without objection?’
    • ‘Instead it was a solid, sensible, stately speech, at times confessional, highly personal.’
    • ‘However, in a drunk, confessional moment, she reveals her desire to ‘know why my grandparents were kicked off that island’.’
    • ‘Matters get decidedly steamy and a tad too confessional, though the lyrical twists reveal depth and vulnerability alongside the braggadocio.’
    • ‘While I'm in a confessional mood, I might as well admit that the technique of salting hashes for increased security in storing passwords had passed me by until recently, too.’
    • ‘The reaction to our contemporary confessional culture has altered the meaning of free speech and privacy.’
    • ‘OK I was just responded to by someone who listened to my stuff, cutting my confessional train of thought off.’
    • ‘Jason coincidentally put up a post about pre-web writings on the same day I stumbled upon a confessional diary of my teenage years.’
    • ‘In fact, both are closer to the warts-and-all confessional psychodramas of reality TV.’
    • ‘This is not necessarily a criticism: refusing to provide much context for their narratives, these songs are guardedly confessional, eager to elicit emotions but hesitant to reveal too much.’
    • ‘‘The tradition of secrecy that exists there is conducive to the confessional aspect of singing and writing songs,’ he says.’
    • ‘In a series of confessional encounters with his Dublin therapist, Ian, he reveals the hoarded guilt that rationally explains an irrational phenomenon.’
    • ‘Like its multi-platinum predecessor, it's full of yearning tunes and poignant, confessional lyrics that foster an intense and highly personal sense of identification between the band and its fans.’
    • ‘With jangly guitars, electronic touches, melancholic melodies, and confessional lyrics, this album is a must have for any indie-pop enthusiast.’
    • ‘One senses they'd rather have a confessional book.’
    • ‘It edges you away from the tendency towards melodrama that you occasionally get in confessional verse.’
    • ‘I have used the confessional voice in both poetry and prose myself, not because I couldn't contain my urge to express myself, but because I thought that it might well be the best technique for a certain piece.’
    • ‘The project (not so much a blog, don't worry) is an ongoing compilation of anonymous, mailed-in confessional postcards prettied up with thematic drawings or collages.’
    1. 1.1Relating to religious confession.
      ‘the priest leaned forward in his best confessional manner’
      • ‘With great scholarly skill, he shows how centuries-old Orthodox religious philosophy and rituals resembled the penitent, confessional modes employed in the Soviet era.’
      • ‘Usually once the ‘penitent’, that is, the person going to confession, closes the confessional door, he or she kneels down on a kneeler, or in the case of someone who is elderly or has another reason for doing so, he or she sits down.’
      • ‘But I did not know until later that our Baptist forefathers had found that wonderful document to be a helpful guide in formulating our early confessional statements.’
      • ‘The confessional language is stunning in its clarity: ‘I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me.’’
      • ‘However, I would no longer go in a confessional booth and say sorry to some superior being for my mistakes, instead, I learn from them, I could never be sorry for my life experiences.’
      • ‘Did he mean he would violate the confessional seal?’
      • ‘A severe looking priest up front was speaking very softly, only slightly louder than a confessional whisper.’
      • ‘I cried, the shock hurling my voice aloud, out of the confessional whisper.’
      • ‘Church leaders should not use the protection they enjoy from being forced to reveal the confessional conversations they have with parishioners to shield priests accused of child abuse.’
      • ‘It becomes an open diary or confessional booth, where inward thoughts are publicly aired.’
      • ‘They spoke in a confessional whisper.’
      • ‘Perhaps she might even blurt it out in a confessional whisper.’
  • 2Relating to confessions of faith or doctrinal systems.

    ‘the confessional approach to religious education’
    • ‘When theological professors and pastors abandon the biblical and confessional doctrine of justification, they sacrifice the gospel and the souls of men.’
    • ‘He was an unashamed confessional Calvinist in an age of doctrinal indifferentism.’
    • ‘Christian doctrine identifies the rules by which Christians use confessional language to define the social world that they indwell.’
    • ‘They started with an a priori assumption that their particular confessional stance descended from the original expression of the Christian faith in the first century.’
    • ‘God is not revealed in words and confessional statements, but as presence.’
    • ‘Institutionally, the field is not best described in the ways better suited to a previous period, using the categories of confessional theology and neutral religious studies.’
    • ‘He rejected confessional Christianity and allowed religious toleration in his kingdom.’
    • ‘It is not a confessional religious statement about the nature of God; rather, only the view of the writer/community is presented.’
    • ‘In the minds of the Enlightenment thinkers, confessional religion, unless checked by law or by free competition, led inevitably to tyranny and persecution.’
    • ‘Religion, especially confessional Christianity, has always concerned itself with authority and certainty.’
    • ‘With regard to Baptists becoming teachers in public schools and confessional religious instruction, the situation in Finland has been much the same as in the other Nordic countries.’
    • ‘The role of confessional statements in the search for unity and the effect of participation in the Eucharist to establish the fellowship of believers with each other and Jesus Christ are seen as forging an inner link.’
    • ‘The decree on revelation, moreover, underscored the mystery of our encounter with the divine and hence the inadequacy of all our confessional statements about it.’
    • ‘Perhaps the textual orientation of cyberspace will reinvigorate the literate modes of Calvinism and other confessional groups.’
    • ‘Curiously, his weakest section is the book's centerpiece chapter on the phenomenon of confessional Protestantism.’
    • ‘Every denomination has its theological articles and books of theology, its liturgies and confessional statements.’
    • ‘In the field of confessional theology there have been developments that allow greater receptivity to new ideas.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as an adjective): the adjective from confession+ -al; the noun via French from Italian confessionale, from medieval Latin, neuter of confessionalis, from Latin confessio(n-), from confiteri ‘acknowledge’ (see confess).

Pronunciation

confessional

/kənˈfɛʃ(ə)n(ə)l/