Definition of cookie in English:

cookie

Pronunciation /ˈko͝okē/ /ˈkʊki/

See synonyms for cookie on Thesaurus.com

Translate cookie into Spanish

nouncookies

  • 1North American A small sweet cake, typically round and flat and having a crisp or chewy texture.

    • ‘freshly baked cookies’
  • 2informal A person of a specified kind.

    • ‘a tough cookie with one eye on her bank account’
    • ‘It is a waiting game and a praying game but he is a tough cookie.’
    • ‘If they say I'm a tough cookie, it's because they're sloppy.’
    • ‘But Andy is a tough cookie, and he is sticking it out.’
    • ‘Once you've driven your flag into the North Pole, proven to yourself that you're actually a pretty tough cookie, what's the point in doing it again?’
    • ‘Of course, I had always known she was a tough cookie.’
    • ‘You're one tough cookie when it comes to forgiveness.’
    • ‘She's a smart cookie, a ‘tough cookie,’ as one character mockingly calls her.’
    • ‘You don't know what it's like until you're there, and I'm a pretty tough cookie myself.’
    • ‘But he is a very tough cookie indeed, having been brought up in the military atmosphere of West Point.’
    • ‘After all, I am used to seeing her as a pretty tough cookie.’
    • ‘Coles is a tough cookie, and that impresses his teammates the most.’
    • ‘Dylan's a tough cookie, and you can read all about it on his very engaging and frequently updated website.’
    • ‘Butler, a tough cookie if ever there was one, refused to crumble after he was diagnosed with lung cancer on July 4.’
    • ‘Jenn's one tough cookie but she has a heart of gold.’
    • ‘Vanessa Craft meets one tough cookie who's definitely in control.’
    • ‘They were tough cookies, some of them, really tough cookies but they were also terribly warm-hearted.’
    • ‘Besides, I'm a tough little cookie - you said so yourself.’
    • ‘The older women were tough cookies let me tell you.’
    • ‘Mr Gove is a smart cookie, and he is trying to suggest one.’
    • ‘Because - listen to this and believe it - you're a smart cookie.’
    person, human being, human, being, mortal, soul, creature, thing
  • 3Computing
    A packet of data sent by a web server to a browser, which is returned by the browser each time it subsequently accesses the same server, used to identify the user or track their access to the server.

    ‘Some servers use cookies to track users from site to site, and some use them to uncover the identity of the user.’
    • ‘He had failed to grasp the fact that the browser itself stores the cookies on the user's hard drive.’
    • ‘The main purpose of a cookie is to identify users and possibly prepare customized Web pages for them.’
    • ‘The use of advertising cookies sent by third-party servers is standard in the Internet industry.’
    • ‘Companies using cookies and other internet tracking devices will have to provide information to users, giving them the chance to opt out.’

Phrases

    that's the way the cookie crumbles
    informal
    • That's how things turn out (often used of an undesirable but unalterable situation)

      • ‘“It's so unfair.” “That's the way the cookie crumbles.”’
      • ‘Because that's the way the cookie crumbles, boy.’
      • ‘Sorry, that's the way the cookie crumbles.’
      • ‘It's crass and I apologize, but that's the way the cookie crumbles.’
      • ‘Oh well, I guess that's the way the cookie crumbles…’
      • ‘Unrealistic, but that's the way the cookie crumbles for me.’
      • ‘But that's the way the cookie crumbles as they say and I look back in pensive mood at those happier days when we were proud to have her as our MP.’
      • ‘I feel kinda bad for them too, but, hey, that's the way the cookie crumbles.’
      • ‘I was truly mourning the loss of a good party, but…that's the way the cookie crumbles.’
      • ‘But that's the way the cookie crumbles and more than a few fans will feel Montgomery's dropping is long overdue.’
      • ‘He felt angry at himself for letting that happen, but as the saying goes; that's the way the cookie crumbles.’

Origin

Early 18th century from Dutch koekje ‘little cake’, diminutive of koek.