Definition of definite in English:

definite

adjective

  • 1Clearly stated or decided; not vague or doubtful.

    ‘we had no definite plans’
    • ‘Although I'm planning on some definite distinctions between the two.’
    • ‘I don't think there's a definite answer to whether or not writers use alcohol as a creative enabler, a relaxant, a means to conquer fear, or a way to battle neuroses.’
    • ‘Council departments have been asked to draw up proposals on how to save money, although definite plans can't be made until the Government announces its spending assessments early next year.’
    • ‘I don't want to give an off-the-cuff definite answer.’
    • ‘Approval in principle has been obtained from the Department of Environment, and it is hoped to have a definite plan for phase one of infill housing submitted to the Department by mid year.’
    • ‘Both speak as if the question has a definite answer one way or the other; they seem to share the assumption that a play is a fixed and authorially controlled text which must be performed as written or not performed at all.’
    • ‘One 72-year-old man had definite plans: ‘I am now going to have a pint, and toast the Queen before I go home,’ he said.’
    • ‘The uncertainty has been going on since February or March, and right through the summer we've been asking about what was going to happen, because we need to know, but without any definite answer.’
    • ‘The interviewer is looking for evidence that you followed a definite lead that was planned, thought through properly and had long-term potential.’
    • ‘It goes without saying that planners will hope to have a definite site and building plans for the proposed National Stadium available by then.’
    • ‘Experts said the accident would not force a change in the rail route and a definite restoration plan will be worked out by late October or early November.’
    • ‘Officialdom in any form, government or anywhere else, seems not to be prepared to help until a definite clearance programme is planned and assessed.’
    • ‘A visitor centre is being planned for the Great Bustard Project in the Everleigh area and more details will be published when plans are more definite.’
    • ‘In any event, Lara wishes she could have given you a more definite answer; but this is the best she's got.’
    • ‘Depression is a shifting concept with definite but vague historical parameters.’
    • ‘We're looking at ways of commemorating his memory in a lasting way in the school and will decide on something definite in the coming weeks.’
    explicit, specific, express, precise, exact, defined, well defined, clear-cut
    unmistakable, irrefutable, unequivocal, unambiguous, certain, undisputed, decided, marked, distinct, unquestioned, not in question, not in doubt
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    1. 1.1Clearly true or real; unambiguous.
      ‘no definite proof has emerged’
      • ‘The four-member commission's report is still being drafted and its final conclusions are not yet definite.’
      • ‘‘Angie's death is a possibility, Christopher, but it is not yet definite,’ I insisted.’
      • ‘They've yet to reach a definite conclusion about why a hydrogen fuel sensor failed last Wednesday.’
      • ‘So there is a definite connection with the real world, but only a few important properties have been selected for further consideration.’
      • ‘‘This means it's not definite yet and that's a good sign,’ she said.’
      • ‘While Gardaí have yet to established a definite motive for the stabbing, they are investigating whether she was deliberately targeted.’
      • ‘Anyhow, this tournament is really making me start to scratch my head as I don't have a definite pick yet for the winning team, just too unpredictable.’
      • ‘There are many theories without any definite proof.’
      • ‘I said last time it needed to be sorted out quickly and, although that is still the case because nothing is yet definite, I'm pleased some kind of decision has been made.’
      • ‘But there is still no definite proof of the existence of such an animal.’
      • ‘It was almost incomprehensible to her that anyone could exist in this ramshackle environment, yet there were definite signs of life; not least of all the faint sound of chatter coming from up the road.’
      • ‘One case where there is definite proof of a serious after-effect is with the live polio vaccine which induces paralysis at an incidence of about one case per two to three million doses.’
      • ‘‘My getting this award is definite proof that our traditions and customs are appreciated by other nations,’ he said.’
      • ‘I have had the rare opportunity of seeing definite proof of this fact.’
      • ‘He faced every modern government's dilemma of trying to seek definite proof in cases of conspiracy.’
      • ‘There is not a single object the existence of which we hesitate to accept until definite proofs are furnished.’
      • ‘Here was definite proof that Alex liked me, and I wasn't sure how I felt about it.’
      • ‘The economy is too large and complex to draw definite conclusions.’
      • ‘This, she felt, was definite proof of Charlie's negative influence in Adam's behavior.’
      • ‘Yet I've pretty much come to the definite conclusion that he must at least be attracted to me.’
      certain, sure, positive, absolute, conclusive, decisive, firm, concrete, final, unambiguous, unequivocal, unquestionable, unarguable, clear, manifest, obvious, patent, unmistakable, proven
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    2. 1.2predicative (of a person) certain or sure about something.
      ‘you're very definite about that!’
      • ‘But Dymbel knows his subject, and he's absolutely definite - it's not a Beatle.’
      • ‘Plenty of time for that when we are more definite about people's intentions.’
      • ‘So I'm definite that he did catch me and it should have been a penalty.’
      • ‘I am definite that we will lay our hands on those criminals.’
      • ‘But no, she was quite definite it was Gandhi she had in mind.’
      • ‘The woman was very definite as to who was at fault.’
      • ‘He was unusually definite about his current choice.’
      • ‘I play very definite women who are very forward and don't suffer fools.’
      • ‘Ollie may be only just over a week old, but he's quite definite about what he likes, so here's a list of his favorite things.’
      • ‘Andy is definite about staying in Bulgaria and already calls Rousse his home.’
      • ‘It is his sole hobby and he is definite that his future career lies in computers or electronics.’
      • ‘She was definite that no one from the Church had offered help.’
      • ‘First of all he's very definite about the place of non-rational experience.’
      • ‘He pulls me into one last hug and I'm definite I'm not going to let him go this time.’
      certain, sure, positive, absolute, conclusive, decisive, firm, concrete, final, unambiguous, unequivocal, unquestionable, unarguable, clear, manifest, obvious, patent, unmistakable, proven
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    3. 1.3Clear or undeniable (used for emphasis)
      ‘under the circumstances, air conditioning is a definite asset’
      • ‘This statement must be made in clear and definite terms, and there must further be some prima facie evidence that it has some foundation in fact.’
      • ‘Therefore, I would like to challenge all those clubs and organizations that go so far in promoting this type of discrimination to provide a clear and definite reason for doing so.’
      • ‘It could be that a lot of us don't have any real clue about what we want - we don't have a clear and definite aim and therefore are lacking the ambition of living life to the full.’
      • ‘Muir never asked himself those questions, but it is clear that a definite change occurred.’
      • ‘As is to be regretted, no clear and definite tasks of this kind were posed to the Navy.’
      • ‘It's a bit too early to see any clear and definite results, but it seems things are going well.’
      • ‘Attempting to get that rune is definite, clear and utter suicide.’
      • ‘This only takes me about ten minutes a day and I feel so much more in tune with things; I can notice a definite decrease in my perception when I am away or skip a day by being in a total rush.’
      • ‘There's a definite country influence that runs throughout the record, most obviously on ‘Say It Ain't So’.’
      • ‘The photo you sent of yourself will be a definite asset to you.’
      • ‘The number of provocative questions raised make it a most definite asset to the fields of African film and cultural studies.’
      • ‘Diego Corrales has been criticized for having a porous defense but his asset is definite power in either hand.’
      • ‘Quick-thinking reactions become a definite asset during the fighting sequences.’
      • ‘He makes big plays and his ability to play up in the box would be a definite asset in Dom Capers' zone blitz scheme.’
      • ‘Signatures of interest groups who have credibility in the state can be a definite asset.’
      • ‘They have a definite Brit-pop influence but much harder, at least live (i don't think the new album is as hard).’
      • ‘On the topic of mass gatherings, Blackburn also notes that the student strike during creation/rehearsal time had a definite influence on the production.’
      • ‘I don't really like drum and bass, and the album has a definite influence, but it's not overly, mmm, overt, and on occasions I think the singer sounds a little like Sade.’
    4. 1.4Having exact and discernible physical limits or form.
      ‘organizations have boundaries in the sense that they may occupy a definite geographical area’
      • ‘It used to be only in America that cities were defined rather unromantically as ‘municipal corporations occupying a definite area’.’
      • ‘As a rule it will not be waged in a definite military-geographic area.’
      fixed, marked, demarcated, delimited, stipulated, particular, circumscribed
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Usage

For an explanation of the difference between definite and definitive, see
definitive

Origin

Mid 16th century from Latin definitus ‘defined, set within limits’, past participle of definire (see define).

Pronunciation

definite

/ˈdɛfɪnət/