Definition of detract in English:

detract

See synonyms for detract

Translate detract into Spanish

verb

  • 1detract fromno object Diminish the worth or value of (a quality or achievement)

    • ‘these quibbles in no way detract from her achievement’
    belittle, take away from, diminish, reduce, lessen, minimize, lower, make light of, play down, discount, soft-pedal, brush aside, gloss over, trivialize, decry, depreciate, denigrate, devalue, devaluate, deprecate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Take away (a specified amount) from the worth or value of a quality or achievement.
      • ‘it detracts not one iota from the credit due to them’
  • 2detract someone/something fromwith object Cause someone or something to be distracted or diverted from.

    ‘the complaint was timed to detract attention from the ethics issue’
    • ‘the role did not include operational responsibilities that would detract him from his work’
    • ‘The allegations would have detracted me from my election campaign.’
    • ‘Sets and costumes are simple yet adequate but this should not detract you from acquiring this competitively priced package that offers an outstanding performance.’
    • ‘But these should not detract us from enjoying a book that, even if at times quite demanding, will enhance our understanding of numbers and make us appreciate their history.’
    • ‘Further, the developing countries did not want environmental issues to unduly detract them from the primary task of development and eradication of poverty.’
    • ‘At 15 tracks long, Sound Of The Underground does seem drag on towards the end but don't let that detract you from the fact that this really is an impressive debut.’
    • ‘The best policy is to put money into exterminating the disease and nothing must detract us from this.’
    • ‘No worldly temptation was enough to detract him from the ultimate aim of human life.’
    • ‘Whatever the method, one can only assume that she successfully detracts attention away from her face.’
    • ‘The terraced landscaping on the entrance from the Tullow Road detracts the eye from some poor rear boundaries to dwellings on this entrance.’
    • ‘Maybe it's because titles mean detracting attention from the music itself.’
    • ‘Concentration on fluctuations in oil prices has detracted attention from the fundamental changes occurring in world oil and gas markets.’
    • ‘But she stresses the short lifespan of a football career should not detract girls from getting involved in the sport.’
    • ‘One way of hiding the leaves is to grow the bulbs near or through other plants that will provide cover or detract the eye.’
    • ‘The pain momentarily stunned him but not enough to detract his attention from her.’
    • ‘‘Bad’ diction is really speech that calls attention to itself, detracting the listener's attention from what is being said.’
    • ‘Others say she is detracting attention from the presidential hopeful, which could cost him the Oval office.’
    • ‘De Lorean succeeded by projecting a glorious vision of the future which detracted policy makers' attention from their dry but prescient statistical analyses.’
    • ‘Icann said the lawsuit was an attempt to detract attention from its upcoming meeting in Vancouver.’
    • ‘Let me also say that my motive is not to detract attention from the noble few who set examples on which we can draw.’
    • ‘This is to detract the attention of the people from the terrible times in Rome.’

Pronunciation

detract

/dəˈtrak(t)/ /dəˈtræk(t)/

Origin

Late Middle English from Latin detract- ‘drawn away’, from the verb detrahere, from de- ‘away from’ + trahere ‘draw’.