Definition of diary in English:

diary

noundiaries

  • 1A book in which one keeps a daily record of events and experiences.

    • ‘In either case, keep a diary or other written record of events.’
    • ‘All participants completed a stress scale questionnaire and kept a daily food diary.’
    • ‘Throughout the study, participants kept a daily symptom diary and completed a quality-of-life questionnaire.’
    • ‘A video diary was kept during the trip and has been used to produce a TV documentary.’
    • ‘If the student writes an online diary on an external website, we won't know unless the student tells us.’
    • ‘A written symptom diary was completed each morning, and spirometry was performed twice daily.’
    • ‘After all, she couldn't deny that she'd read a secret diary or two in her day.’
    • ‘Eligible patients completed a baseline headache diary for four weeks.’
    • ‘A travel diary recording all activities is also required to be kept by members in these circumstances.’
    • ‘During all this time every half hour I faithfully updated the electronic diary the consumer people sent me.’
    • ‘The diary reveals all of her feelings that she doesn't want anyone to see.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the diaries reveal a later life of flamboyant perversity.’
    • ‘His diary records the belief that the British would easily defeat the Japanese.’
    • ‘I was reading Mother's diary, and in one entry she admitted her secret.’
    • ‘Nelson's well-chosen diary extracts are, apart from anything else, hilarious.’
    • ‘You may recall that on his recent tour, Eric Idle kept a witty, engrossing day-to-day online diary.’
    • ‘How can anyone touched by the eloquent pages of Anne Frank's diary become an anti-Semite?’
    • ‘Particularly interesting is that this diary was begun exactly nine years ago today.’
    • ‘It is difficult to be inspired to keep up with a pen and paper diary because it takes so long to finish each entry.’
    • ‘I shall write in this diary every night, so that if something happens, there'll at least be some kind of record.’
    journal, memoir, chronicle, log, logbook, weblog, blog, vlog, day-by-day account, daily record, history, annal, record, moblog
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    1. 1.1British A book with spaces for each day of the year in which one notes appointments or information.
      • ‘You should not be foolish enough to venture on to the British rail network with anything like a scheduled appointment in your diary.’
      • ‘You got an alphabetised phone and address book, an appointments diary and a basic notepad so you could jot down short text pieces.’
      • ‘Like most people I used to keep a personal diary for appointments etc in the form of something called paper.’
      • ‘In fact, Himmler's appointments book and diaries, where extant, come as close as most people would require to demonstrating what the Final Solution was all about.’
      • ‘I phoned your office and was told that you had not booked the appointment in your diary and that you were feeling ill.’
      • ‘Achieving a toehold in America remains an objective and he intends to explore this option with appointments already in his diary to meet distributors.’
      • ‘Make a note in your diary for the next series in May 2005, and remember that without the BBC that was we wouldn't have such priceless gems.’
      • ‘They said they had been able to place appointments in his diary for their clients, with the help of his constituency secretary who had also worked for Beattie.’
      • ‘And whilst I may or may not be asked to sing in any of them myself, I'll definitely be putting a note in my diary to go along.’
      • ‘In reality, it was Mr Kerry who refused to make space in his diary.’
      • ‘To avoid any repetition of this nightmare I have put a note in my diary to use my mobile to ring the Speaking Clock in five months' time.’
      • ‘I jumped out of the driver's seat and made an appointment in my diary, got the dog out, shut the boot and off we went for a walk.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, she has a full diary of counselling appointments, just as on any other day.’
      • ‘Make a note in your diary of the consultation dates and go along and let your view be known.’
      • ‘I bet York architect Phil Bixby and North Yorkshire garden designer Rosie Allisstone don't have acres of virginal white space in their diaries.’
      • ‘What I would love you to do though, is to make a note in your diaries of two special dates right now.’
      • ‘All gardeners should have some quiet time in their horticultural diaries to give them space to reflect.’
      • ‘Mark it down in your diaries and we'll have more news in the coming weeks with regard to the entertainment and guests of honour on the night etc.’
      • ‘His business partner Diarmuid Lennon is now managing director of the company, which produces magazines, yearbooks and diaries.’
      • ‘His green eyes darkened as he stared at the diary, its cover slightly damaged by water that had long since evaporated.’
      appointment book, engagement book, organizer, personal organizer, calendar, agenda
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    2. 1.2A column in a newspaper or magazine giving news or gossip on a particular topic.
      ‘the City Diary’
      • ‘The next day he'd even got the story in some of the newspaper diaries.’
      • ‘Balance is important; no newspaper is exclusively politics or celebrity gossip, so the diary cannot be that way either.’
      • ‘Yet in the news pages, entertainment columns and social diaries of the same publications, the celebrity cycle continues to turn.’
      • ‘The possible participation of Camilla Parker Bowles has occupied column inches in the diaries of The Times and the Daily Telegraph all week.’
      • ‘This column, like all diaries, is fond, indeed much enamoured, of the legal profession.’
      • ‘The diary column reported on an elderly Dales farmer who was taking only his second holiday away from the farm, a week in Morecambe.’
      • ‘Last week, in the letters page to the Daily Telegraph, he wrote to defend the Edinburgh group from an item which appeared in a diary column.’
      • ‘The diary column recalled the days of ‘sparrow shoots’ which were particularly popular in north Craven.’
      • ‘I don't expect any of them to review it, and so far none of them have, but I thought it might get a mention in a diary column here and there.’
      • ‘Not only is he Cambodia's top boxing journalist, he is a diary writer for the capital's biggest newspaper.’
      • ‘The diary has gone, but a four-page news roundup section has been added.’
      • ‘Richard Wild is going to be the subject of my BBC News Online diary this week.’
      • ‘Charlie's first column appears next week and the diary awaits his musings with interest.’
      • ‘Great news for regular diary readers - Swiss Radio Man is alive and well, and greeted the BBC team in familiar fashion on Monday.’
      • ‘Jenson Button will share his thoughts on every single race in an exclusive diary for Five Live.’
      • ‘We will have a full report on the night in next week's diary page.’
      • ‘More about the big night in Tooreen in next week's diary page.’
      • ‘He was a particular favourite of mine when I was writing diary columns.’
      • ‘By good luck, there was a vacancy on Peterborough, the paper's diary column.’
      • ‘Diary columns are a popular home for more subtle anti-gay hatred.’

Origin

Late 16th century from Latin diarium, from dies ‘day’.

Pronunciation

diary

/ˈdʌɪəri/