Definition of digs in English:

digs

Pronunciation /diɡz/ /dɪɡz/

See synonyms for digs

Translate digs into Spanish

plural noun

informal
  • Living quarters.

    • ‘they are looking for new digs’
    • ‘At least Nigel has nice new digs now - complete with sunshine views and indoor plants!’
    • ‘For the record, here's the link to his new digs at Normblog.’
    • ‘Come celebrate our new digs and the spirit of the holiday season with us.’
    • ‘In January, he got together with the company in its new digs to choreograph a new piece, premiering later this year.’
    • ‘So it's especially frustrating when your mysteriously marked-down new digs turn out to be haunted by vengeful spirits.’
    • ‘Next time somebody gets murdered or decides to blow their head off at your digs, this South Shore resident is the man you'll soon want to call.’
    • ‘Anyhow, I failed to mention yesterday that you should go over and see Miguel at his new digs.’
    • ‘The center's new digs also house recordings, memorabilia, original letters, and first-edition musical scores.’
    • ‘As a bachelor architect designing my own digs, leaving room for them was pretty much at the bottom of the priorities list.’
    • ‘It takes a particularly brave soul to hand over the keys to his carefully and artfully arranged digs for such an extended period of time - especially to someone like me - one of the blogless.’
    • ‘It was implied that it was some sort of intellectual book and so I stuffed it in my bag and forgot about it until I got back to my digs when I discovered that the book was this though not in that binding.’
    • ‘I got back to my digs, it was about 11: 00 am on a damp Friday morning.’
    • ‘When I get back to my digs, I climb straight into bed.’
    • ‘I walked back to my digs, light-headed from lack of sleep.’
    • ‘If not, well, think of all the time I'll have to redo the new digs.’
    lodgings, living quarters, quarters, rooms
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century short for diggings, used in the same sense, probably referring to the land where a farmer digs, i.e. works and, by extension, lives.