Definition of disfavor in English:

disfavor

(British disfavour)

noun

  • 1Disapproval or dislike.

    ‘the headmaster regarded her with disfavor’
    • ‘There is nothing new in this: the Monarchy has almost always been regarded with disfavour, so has the ‘Establishment’, especially when times were bad.’
    • ‘A decision-maker may have unfairly regarded with disfavour one party's case either consciously or unconsciously.’
    • ‘Spam has retained some popularity in various parts of the world, although regarded with disfavour by those who eschew processed foods or have pretensions to gourmet status.’
    • ‘From the beginning, the Protestant Reformers looked with disfavor on the contemplative life and on the quality of mystery that they designated ‘otherworldly.’’
    • ‘At one stage there was also a rumour that he was in some disfavour with the board because of delays to the construction of Seven's new Martin Place studios in the heart of Sydney.’
    • ‘Today every song in the home-burned CDs met with disfavor.’
    • ‘His choice not to intervene won him international disfavor.’
    • ‘But those singled out for disfavor can be forgiven for suspecting more invidious forces at work.’
    • ‘That readership includes employees who learn what stories will meet with the favour or disfavour of management.’
    • ‘But contemporary celebrity is plugged into a relentless cycle of favour and disfavour.’
    • ‘‘It's an industry that's sensitive to public expressions of favor and disfavor,’ he said.’
    • ‘Under normal circumstances, such a situation leads to a regime of favoritism and disfavor.’
    • ‘The judge was right to view this submission with disfavour.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, this year state budgets face such shortfalls that tax credits are looked upon with disfavor.’
    • ‘It has always been viewed with disfavor by our courts.’
    • ‘He looks with disfavor on this simplest solution because it imposes a particular geometry on space and also requires some kind of master clock to synchronize the updating of all the cells throughout the grid.’
    • ‘We feel disfavor for all ideals that might lead one to feel at home even in this fragile, broken time of transition; as for its ‘realities,’ we do not believe that they will last.’
    • ‘It must have been near the end of school for I was already walking barefoot, something that my father, the local country doctor, looked on with disfavor.’
    disapproval, disapprobation, lack of favour
    1. 1.1The state of being disliked.
      ‘raises could be taken away if an employee fell into disfavor’
      • ‘Because they are difficult to grow, farro and spelt fell into disfavor as farmers turned to raising the more profitable and high-yielding commercial wheat variety.’
      • ‘Human intelligence fell into disfavor during the 90's, even into the 80's.’
      • ‘It fell into disfavor when synthetic thyroid became more popular.’
      • ‘Conservative policies then seemed to prosper as conservative parties fell into disfavor with voters.’
      • ‘In the end, the movement fell into disfavor after World War 1 due to a number of factors.’
      • ‘Over time, laws that treated women as the property of their husbands fell into disfavor, and state legislatures eliminated many of the status-based disabilities that married women had formerly endured.’
      • ‘He was also secretary to Becket with whom he was exiled when he fell into disfavour with Henry II.’
      • ‘Linking social capital between communities and representatives in the state apparatus falls into disfavour.’
      • ‘Maximus fell into disfavour and Rome sent the largest army it had ever assembled after Hannibal.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, the chair who routinely fails to make the hard decisions on personnel will soon fall into disfavor with his or her dean - and then the entire department may suffer.’
      • ‘Why have we seen vaccine development fall into such disfavor?’
      • ‘However, by the mid-15th century, shields began to fall into disfavour among the cavalry, already well protected by body armour.’
      • ‘About AD 130 he fell into disfavour, although it is disputed whether or not he was exiled.’
      • ‘Overall, the motion picture is an effective and intense portrait of the downfall and destruction of a woman who falls into society's disfavor, but it is far from a flawless effort.’
      • ‘But eventually the group as a whole fell into some disfavor.’
      • ‘Therefore, the use of ampicillin has fallen into disfavor.’
      • ‘This theory seems to have fallen into disfavor for two reasons.’
      • ‘One food ingredient that has fallen into a little disfavour is transfatty acids.’
      • ‘This picture naturally also fell into disfavour.’
      • ‘Between 1983 and 1988 some tests that had been used quite widely fell into disfavour.’
      become unpopular, become disliked, get on the wrong side of someone

transitive verb

[with object]
  • Regard or treat (someone or something) with disfavor.

    ‘the hypothesis was favored and disfavored by approximately equal numbers of scientists’
    • ‘International human rights organizations, then, are important vehicles for spreading universal virtues, but they also take advantage of structural relationships that favor strong states and disfavor weak ones.’
    • ‘Why not just say government may not favor or disfavor religion?’
    • ‘In this work we have sought to characterize the channels formed by avicins and to begin exploring the conditions that favor or disfavor channel formation.’
    • ‘Selection can favor or disfavor an allele, and this can be different in the two different habitat types.’
    • ‘In addition, if a state disfavors same-sex marriage it cannot be compelled to recognize such a union performed in another state.’
    • ‘It has been noted that this strategy disfavors female workers who make less than men and as a result, have less to invest.’
    • ‘The Court instituted a constitutional rule that is party-blind and that disfavors systems with ad hoc recount standards.’
    • ‘Natural selection disfavors mutations that cause pistils to accept pollen from genotypes that reject their pollen.’
    • ‘These are not the sorts of cases where prosecutorial discretion naturally disfavors prosecution.’
    • ‘On the other hand, many arguments disfavor the possibility of bioluminescent communication among larvae.’
    • ‘Such an outlook views with disfavor every advance in human thinking since the French Revolution, if not the Renaissance.’
    • ‘The court disfavors motions to exceed page limits; such motions will be granted only for extraordinarily compelling reasons.’
    • ‘Individually, these factors can favor or disfavor binding; the binding affinity is determined by the net effect.’
    • ‘This is due to a balance between various contributions that favor or disfavor one or the other form.’
    • ‘More specifically, the general public should systematically overestimate the net economic benefits of the policies that economists disfavor.’

Pronunciation

disfavor

/disˈfāvər/ /dɪsˈfeɪvər/