Definition of do-or-die in English:

do-or-die

adjective

  • Showing or requiring a determination not to compromise or be deterred.

    ‘the mercenaries fought with a do-or-die fanaticism’
    • ‘Such terms of office discourage an all-out, do-or-die attitude among politicians and followers to remain in office.’
    • ‘They gambled on a do-or-die mission over the final ten minutes in a late bid to rescue themselves.’
    • ‘So it will come as little surprise to reveal that it wears its patriotism on its sleeve, littering proceedings with gutsy do-or-die speeches.’
    • ‘He went on to suffer two more maximums as he adopted a do-or-die style in a desperate attempt to qualify after his poor start.’
    • ‘However, he has a combative, athletic, do-or-die spirit which welcomes competition.’
    • ‘The do-or-die nature of the final-day matches could unnerve some but he knows the teams lucky enough to get the required points for play-off places must get used to the heart-stopping nature of what is effectively cup-tie football.’
    • ‘But while both the team's performance and the outcome of that match could swing things one way or the other, he insists that while it could be construed as a trial match for the players he selects, is not a do-or-die 90 minutes for him.’
    • ‘In 2000, South Carolina was the do-or-die state.’
    • ‘People think that one game is do-or-die, but it is not about one game.’
    • ‘‘The second set loss influenced their play in the do-or-die set, and made them lose their coordination between movement and mind,’ he said.’
    • ‘It menacingly attempts - some might day chillingly succeeds - to re-create the do-or-die nature of a pilot assigned to deliver death from above.’
    • ‘He is trying to get back his life and suddenly he's thrown into a do-or-die situation.’
    • ‘Lucky rabbit's feet are being stroked, charms rubbed and four-leafed clovers jealously guarded as nervous York football fans gear up for England's do-or-die clash with Brazil.’
    • ‘But the other eight are already in do-or-die mode.’
    • ‘And if this is an indication of things to come when the four teams meet in do-or-die contests, the patrons should enjoy every ball that is bowled and every stroke that is played.’
    • ‘This was not quite a do-or-die occasion for his men but having slipped two points adrift at the bottom last week, there was an air of anxiety around the place in no way eased by startling cup success.’
    • ‘And which are the do-or-die issues, and which are expendable?’
    • ‘It's a do-or-die match, even though the ‘back door’ system is there.’
    • ‘I do see it as a do-or-die issue, and yet my position was dead.’
    • ‘When the dust settles on that little do-or-die tournament, two of the three will no longer be classed as senior clubs and the third will breathe a sigh of relief.’
    last-ditch, last-chance, last-resort, last-minute, last-gasp, eleventh-hour, all-out, do-or-die, final
    violent, dangerous, lawless

Pronunciation

do-or-die