Definition of doorstep in English:

doorstep

noun

  • 1A step leading up to the outer door of a house.

    ‘he put his foot on the doorstep of the cottage’
    • ‘I smiled hesitantly at her and she grinned back as she stepped over the doorstep and into our house.’
    • ‘I took the long way around, and when I came closer I could see her sitting on the doorsteps to the back door of the house.’
    • ‘When I take my first step off of the doorstep, I hear the door behind me open and I can feel his eyes on my back.’
    • ‘Then he opened the door and stepped out onto the doorstep.’
    • ‘He came upon the doorstep of his next door neighbour's house, and rang the doorbell.’
    • ‘Ideally there should be easy access between the kitchen and the doorstep or main entrance of the house.’
    • ‘They would jump out from behind the bushes and scare the girls and we would scream in exaggerated fright and run to the doorstep of the next house on the block.’
    • ‘If you don't lay that at the doorstep of the White House, I don't know where you lay it.’
    • ‘He always met Bryan and me at the doorstep of their house with a teary eye and a happy hug.’
    • ‘Also, he could have backed up his rhetoric with non-confrontational acts such as asking people to hold candlelight vigils in the doorsteps of their houses.’
    • ‘Water was lapping at the doorsteps of houses.’
    • ‘I skipped up my doorstep and threw the door open.’
    • ‘She stepped up to the doorstep and rang the bell.’
    • ‘He walked up to the doorstep of the small house.’
    • ‘As he was recognized the following morning at the doorstep of his house, the family's horror turned into jubilation.’
    • ‘Finally, after ten minutes of coaxing, she got me to the doorstep of my house and hesitantly I pressed the doorbell.’
    • ‘His servant had said at the doorstep of his house that her master was down with a cold and was not liable to come out and play with them.’
    • ‘I could see them from the doorstep of the house where I grew up.’
    • ‘He reached the farm, and found a path of dirt that led him to the doorstep of the main house.’
    • ‘He was sitting on the front doorstep with the door open and called me to him when I passed by.’
    doorstep, sill
    1. 1.1British informal A thick slice of bread.
      as modifier ‘doorstep sandwiches’
      • ‘There are lovely thick doorsteps of toast dripping with butter.’
      • ‘And I was cutting the cheddar into pretty thick slices figuring I would make a proper doorstep sandwich and maybe smear some Branston pickle on the cheese, yeah?’
      • ‘To serve, you can stick a wedge on a plate with a huge green salad, but my personal favourite is to whack a wedge between two doorstep slices of bread, then smother with ketchup.’
      • ‘The jury decided on the following: Champagne breakfast with scrambled eggs and smoked salmon on doorsteps of Granary Bread fried in olive oil on one side.’
      • ‘Ravenous, I returned home and immediately grilled the burgers and enjoyed them on huge doorsteps of white Yorkshire bread.’
      • ‘You need a loaf of fresh bread, a doorstep of cheese that you could stand on to clean the ceiling with and a few spicy pickled onions with this beer!’
      • ‘While I recover at a safe distance with a comforting cup of tea, doorstep of bread and some of the luscious honey, he explains how the hive works and how honey is actually made.’
      • ‘We knew that the canisters of sweet tea and boxes of doorstep sandwiches would soon be on their way.’
      • ‘It was a great hunk of meat, nice and bloody in the middle, between two massive doorsteps of batch loaf.’
      • ‘In his first volume he protested against the ‘vacuum-cleaner school of biography’ which shoves every particle of research into vast doorstep volumes.’

verbdoorsteps, doorstepping, doorstepped

[with object]informalBritish
  • (of a journalist) wait uninvited outside the home of (someone) in order to obtain an interview or photograph.

    ‘he was being doorstepped by the tabloids’
    • ‘A shadow passes over his face as he thinks back on how one tabloid journalist doorstepped his parents and his ex-girlfriend, and even fired questions at the local librarian.’
    • ‘He also leisurely re-decorated his Georgian rectory in Norfolk where he had moved to avoid journalists doorstepping him in London.’
    • ‘If he were being doorstepped by tabloid journalists that'd be one thing; when he's apparently made the decision to pad out a perfectly engaging subject with irrelevant personal-life candyfloss himself, that's quite another.’
    • ‘Few executives at loss-making small or medium sized enterprises can have been doorstepped by tabloid journalists.’
    • ‘For a while, journalists camped outside her home and doorstepped her parents.’
    • ‘He told me that since August, as the case continued, practically every national newspaper, and quite a few local ones, approached him demanding interviews, frequently doorstepping him with photographers.’
    • ‘Journalists tracked down and doorstepped her ex-husband last year - though by all accounts he didn't put up much resistance.’
    • ‘The legalities of the situation didn't prevent the tabloid doorstepping his distraught mother and naming the housing estate where his parents live.’
    • ‘Some poor young reporter doorstepped the Club for 12 hours hoping to catch a few words.’
    • ‘The reporters really were doorstepping the Prime Minister as he made his way to the palace to resign.’
    • ‘Alas, a posse of reporters doorstepped St Blane's Hotel with an armoury of cameras, tape recorders and notepads.’
    • ‘They were doorstepping the author's 82-year-old mother in an attempt to unearth more revelations.’
    • ‘By first thing the following morning, the tabloids were doorstepping his mum's house in Bow, east London.’
    • ‘There are media outside this Chamber, I understand, doorstepping MPs coming into the Chamber and asking them for an explanation.’
    • ‘Soon afterwards he was doorstepped by a local TV news crew.’
    • ‘Relieved of the obligation to doorstep politicians for a quote, she seems content merely to bat the breeze with her guests.’
    • ‘Friends say he reacted badly to being doorstepped amid the hubbub of arrival because he is always wary of the media (and has good reason to be).’
    • ‘I've been doorstepped, of course, so we went to the country to escape.’
    • ‘Those critical of the press may point to the situation in the United States, where jurors are questioned about their prejudices and then doorstepped for comment following their decisions.’
    • ‘Yep, the woman I doorstepped earlier has sent a response to Friday's frantic emails two hours after the event to which they refer happened.’
    campaign, electioneer, solicit votes, drum up support

Phrases

    on one's (or the) doorstep
    • Situated very close by.

      ‘the airport is on my doorstep so flying is easy’
      • ‘The centre will be a huge convenience to commercial vehicle owners, who will now be able to access the service right on their doorstep.’
      • ‘There are probably thousands of people around here who don't even know there's a lido on their doorstep or, like me, assumed it had closed too.’
      • ‘We are within easy access of the airport and we have catering facilities on our doorstep that we could utilise.’
      • ‘Back home I'd be away from all of that, but realising all of a sudden that I was so close to it all, that it was happening on my doorstep, was scary.’
      • ‘It's not directly on my doorstep like last time, although it sounds awfully close.’
      • ‘The thing about good gastropubs is that they are very handy to have on your doorstep, but you do not cross the metropolis specially.’
      • ‘This home near town would suit those seeking the conveniences of modern living on their doorstep.’
      • ‘The simple reason for this is that these ores weren't all conveniently excavated from quarries on his doorstep.’
      • ‘Having the convenience of the full range of Council services on your doorstep will make life easier for people.’
      • ‘This is real Paris on your doorstep.’

Pronunciation

doorstep

/ˈdɔːstɛp/