Main definitions of duffer in English

: duffer1duffer2

duffer1

See synonyms for duffer

Translate duffer into Spanish

noun

  • 1 informal An incompetent or stupid person, especially an elderly one.

    • ‘he's the most worthless old duffer’
    • ‘For some reason, no matter which production I watch, I'm happy during the first three acts but the minute the old duffer stalks the moors in the storm, I'm lost.’
    • ‘It's very exciting even for an old duffer like me.’
    • ‘But to give the old duffer his due, he isn't the first to attempt such a blatantly bloodsucking sonic hook-up.’
    • ‘If any character ever needed canine companionship, it was the old duffer in that play.’
    • ‘Well it's forty-eight hours on, and Lisa and I have successfully settled into our new life and formed a love triangle with a white-haired old duffer called Oscar.’
    • ‘Having queued in order to buy a paper, some old duffer just walks in front of me in order to get served.’
    • ‘I am not some old duffer who wants to spoil your fun.’
    • ‘He is the lovable old duffer with the frantic, ants-in-the-pants commentating style.’
    • ‘By now, you're saying to yourself, who is this whining old duffer?’
    • ‘The doors opened and two aged citizens emerged, a withered old crow and a thin old duffer.’
    • ‘Don't you think something should be done about it, or at least tell the old duffers to stop making fools of themselves?’
    • ‘This is probably because she's been lumped with the 25 and over category of performers - easily the worst group, as it's full of mental old duffers who all share the knowledge that this is their very last chance to make a success of themselves.’
    • ‘We're just a friendly bunch of old duffers who like getting together every now and then, and having a laugh.’
    • ‘It's just so darned much fun to hear these old duffers talking shop and gossip.’
    • ‘The Tories usually have a laughably naff bunch of old duffers to support them and this time was no different with a couple of new kids on the block.’
    • ‘Alf was a complete duffer when it came to mechanical things such as refilling a ballpoint pen.’
    • ‘The two men, patriarchs of the most powerful families in American politics, have been mucking around on boats this week, playing endless rounds of golf and cracking jokes like any pair of genial old duffers.’
    • ‘It is not as if Bob has ruthlessly ditched loads of old duffers to make way for cutting-edge rock 'n' roll talent.’
    • ‘He made him a life peer in 1998 along with a whole load of other buddies once he'd shipped out some of the old duffers with legislative reform.’
    • ‘The wife and I are going to beach resort for a couple of weeks and I thought I'd pick up a couple of pointers so as not to look like a complete duffer!’
    bungler, blunderer, incompetent, oaf, dunce, dolt, dunderhead, fool, idiot, booby, stupid person, moron, cretin, imbecile
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A person inexperienced at something, especially at playing golf.
      ‘They played two rounds of golf that every duffer in the country can identify with.’
      • ‘A self-described ‘recovering duffer,’ he says the game itself can sometimes get in the way of what a business executive is trying to accomplish with golf.’
      • ‘By slow and careful progress, you can transform yourself from a onetime school sports duffer who would do anything to get out of cross-country running, into someone who can run for 13.1 miles without stopping.’
      • ‘As always, playing skills ranged from near-professional to casual duffer, and good-natured ribbing abounded as teams sized one another up.’
      • ‘He now had bonded not only with the gallery that day but with every duffer who ever dreamed of holing a 45-foot birdie putt on the 72nd green at a U.S. Open.’
      • ‘His site is clear and helpful and even an aging HTML duffer like me can figure out how to do it (after a little thought).’
      • ‘Several local duffers fared well at the Western Canada Junior Golf Tour's season-opening stop at the Point Roberts Golf and Country Club last week.’
      • ‘Later this year, duffers will be able to buy golf balls that are designed to prevent a shift in weight as they spin.’
      • ‘His discovery took the smiles off of golf balls and put them onto the faces of duffers.’
      • ‘But the truth is, even the best pros can have a difficult time teaching the intricacies of the golf swing to a weekend duffer who has little time to practice.’
      • ‘Passing a public golf course they saw a lone duffer out practicing his putt.’
      • ‘But as he noted on June 15: ‘We seem to be on track, but as us duffer golfers like to say, it's not a gimme putt.’’
      • ‘To make a French loss doubly unlikely, they've dropped the only rank duffer amongst them to the bench.’
      • ‘It's also true, of course, that today's players make their '60s counterparts look like weekend duffers by comparison.’
      • ‘Though it's fun to discuss chess history with anyone - grandmasters or duffers - the simple fact is that titles and chess strength have nothing to do with the successful writing of this subject.’
      • ‘They don't look like money; they look like duffers playing euchre on the 19th hole, the way they're kicking back in khakis and golf shirts, one of them scratching his sockless ankle.’
      • ‘What was once an ancient grove of lofty sacred oaks protected by devout Druids and fervent Celts is now the rigidly controlled domain of weekend duffers and their deferential caddies.’
      • ‘U.S. duffers are joining clubs in Scotland and Ireland’
      • ‘The minister predicted the new course would bring a certain rich and adventurous class of duffers to the area, perhaps with their own heavily-armed caddies.’

Pronunciation

duffer

/ˈdəfər/

Origin

Mid 19th century from Scots dowfart ‘stupid person’, from douf ‘spiritless’.

Main definitions of duffer in English

: duffer1duffer2

duffer2

See synonyms for duffer

Translate duffer into Spanish

noun

informal Australian
  • A person who steals and alters the brands on cattle.

Pronunciation

duffer

/ˈdəfər/

Origin

Mid 18th century (as thieves' slang for someone who sells worthless articles as if they were valuable): of unknown origin.