Definition of dustman in English:

dustman

noundustmen

British
  • A man employed to remove household refuse from dustbins.

    • ‘Then, an educated elite was seen as just as important to the running of society as collecting rubbish from the street; and just as the graduate would pay tax for the dustman, so the dustman should cough up for the philosopher.’
    • ‘Each week the whistling dustman came down the back garden, hoisted the full dustbin on his shoulder, carried it up the garden and tipped the contents into the dustcart.’
    • ‘Teachers' contracts honoured but not teaching assistants; police but not police staff; civil servants but not dustmen; and social workers that work in hospitals but not those social workers who work for councils.’
    • ‘I'm sure the rest of the dustmen are fine; I hate the particular guy who insists on coming round to ‘prep’ our road at 5: 30 am every Thursday morning night!’
    • ‘It starts with his assumption that the dustmen of Fairford are lazy.’
    • ‘You should see the mess after the dustmen take the bins away from my house - they drop more rubbish than me and are they going to be fined too?’
    • ‘Personally, I have my doubts and I look forward to the day when operations start and the roads become awash with orphaned bins dumped anywhere because the dustmen won't have time to be tidy.’
    • ‘If the teachers and dustmen of this country could see that certain multi-millionaires are paying less tax than they are, they'd be so angry that the government would surely be obliged to act.’
    • ‘How can people come to work there as nurses, teachers, dustmen, waiters, shop assistants and the thousand other necessary trades when flats or houses cost ten years' wages?’
    • ‘You better get back to me or it will go out for the dustmen before the kids are old enough to select books without pictures or conversations and believe me, there aren't many conversations in this book.’
    • ‘I know the road sweepers and dustmen don't get it so someone is we're just not getting value for money.’
    • ‘No, its like putting stuff into a normal bin, you then have to take that bin and put it in the wheely bin for dustmen to take away’
    • ‘Because new health and safety regulations are being enforced, dustmen no longer empty wheelie bins where the lids can't be closed or pick up bin bags left by the side of bins.’
    • ‘I'm referring, of course, to the dustmen's work to rule, which means that black bags of rubbish are being left on the streets for days before collection.’
    • ‘No longer will it be home to dustmen as they go about their noisy and messy toil, manhandling rubbish sacks in such a manner as to cause eighty percent of the contents to spill out into the gutter.’
    • ‘Originally the coalman used these rear entries and the dustmen without such problems but they were surely never intended to be used as part of the highways network.’
    • ‘The new system, called alternate weekly collection, means rubbish will sit around for up to 14 days at a time before dustmen take it away.’
    • ‘One dustman, who didn't want to be named, said: ‘There were some lads in tears when they heard how much they could be losing, particularly those with mortgages to pay and families to look after.’’
    • ‘Doting dad Will, 22, a dustman, said: ‘It happened in the blink of an eye.’’
    • ‘Her argument went something like this: ‘If a dustman has a heart attack and I save his life isn't it right that he should have paid towards my training through his taxes?’’

Pronunciation

dustman

/ˈdʌs(t)mən/