Definition of episcopalian in English:

episcopalian

adjective

  • 1Of or advocating government of a Church by bishops.

    ‘As in 1662 the Anglican squirearchy would permit no weakening of the hierarchical and episcopalian structure of the Church.’
    1. 1.1Of or belonging to an episcopal Church.

noun

  • 1A person who advocates government of a Church by bishops.

    1. 1.1A member of the Episcopal Church.
      • ‘Perhaps most important, in many urban and rural areas where churches are struggling, Episcopalians and Lutherans will be able to have joint congregations served by a pastor or priest of either body.’
      • ‘Late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Episcopalians searched the early Church for examples to prove to Baptists that infant baptism was ancient and proper.’
      • ‘This summer, Episcopalians, United Methodists and Presbyterians will take up the issue at their individual conventions.’
      • ‘American Episcopalians maintain stubborn resistance to warnings by the world Anglican Communion that they have recklessly broken fellowship.’
      • ‘Most divided are the moderate Protestant denominations, such as the Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Methodists.’
      • ‘It is one of the richest resources on baptism written for Episcopalians in print.’
      • ‘You know, years ago when I was an Episcopalian, another member of the church used the church directory as a marketing tool for his small business, and started making cold calls using it.’
      • ‘Evangelicals are a sub-set of Christianity, a religion that includes Catholics, Episcopalians, liberal Protestants, Greek Orthodox, etc.’
      • ‘This is not unlike the situation of other Protestant churches, including Methodists, Presbyterians, and Episcopalians, to name a few.’
      • ‘The biggest religious disputes here have actually been between Protestants: Episcopalians and Presbyterians, and between the various shades of the latter.’
      • ‘Buffalo's Protestant founders, mainly Episcopalians and Presbyterians, originated in New England and eastern New York.’
      • ‘As Episcopalians, not having an ordained priest available meant we could not celebrate the Eucharist.’
      • ‘Longtime Episcopalians remember the old days of Morning Prayer, but have no explanation for the change-other, perhaps, than that of making a change for change's sake.’
      • ‘Moreover, black Episcopalians have consistently held the Church's feet to the fire, and reminded it when its actions have been inconsistent with the principles it espoused.’
      • ‘Further, in spite of the proliferation of weekday celebrations of lesser feasts, many Episcopalians lack even cursory knowledge of the early church and the patristic fathers.’
      • ‘This book and Glenn's views will be of special interest to Episcopalians with memories of upheavals in church and society a few decades ago.’
      • ‘My own view is that of a person who was born into a family of Episcopalians whose allegiance to that church stretches as far back as anyone can remember.’
      • ‘A brother had left the church several years earlier and become an Episcopalian.’

Pronunciation

episcopalian

/ɪˌpɪskəˈpeɪlɪən/ /ɛˌpɪskəˈpeɪlɪən/