Definition of escapist in English:

escapist

noun

  • A person who seeks distraction and relief from unpleasant realities, especially in the form of entertainment or fantasy.

    ‘the perfect escapist's paradise, almost as remote as a desert island’
    • ‘This is for the escapist: a place to stroll through coconut groves, lie on beaches, or admire a perfect sunset without seeing another soul.’
    • ‘The film is a difficult sell with too much action blockbuster for heady purists, too much intelligence for popcorn escapists.’
    • ‘The style is barefoot sophistication and ideal for honeymooners, escapists and divers, with an excellent dive school and some of the best underwater scenery in the Caribbean just offshore.’
    • ‘Even hard core escapists are bound to be defeated by the generic tough-guy twaddle and the impersonal action sequences.’
    • ‘Players talking about out of game topics or, worse, about the mechanical and numerical aspects of the game world may well ruin the escapists' experience.’

adjective

  • Providing or seeking distraction and relief from unpleasant realities, especially in the form of entertainment or fantasy.

    ‘I was ready for a good escapist read’
    ‘the escapist desires of the moviegoing public’
    • ‘The actors speak directly to the audience, who are meant to realize they are watching a play, reacting thoughtfully instead of seeking emotional identification and escapist entertainment.’
    • ‘He had become typecast as a writer of escapist adventure stories.’
    • ‘The film is basically escapist comedy, which we watch just to find out how they'll tell the same story over again and to see the bad guys get what they deserve.’
    • ‘It's not particularly challenging or adventurous, but as escapist cinema goes, there's almost nothing to find fault with.’
    • ‘In the world of the Depression of the 1920s, and into the years of World War 2, Hollywood churned out an endless succession of highly stylised, escapist fantasies.’

Pronunciation

escapist

/ɪˈskeɪpɪst/