Definition of etiquette in English:

etiquette

Pronunciation /ˈɛtɪkɛt/ /ɛtɪˈkɛt/

noun

mass noun
  • The customary code of polite behaviour in society or among members of a particular profession or group.

    ‘the rules of etiquette are changing’
    with modifier ‘court etiquette was now familiar to Joan’
    as modifier ‘etiquette books’
    • ‘The basic code that helps maintain a healthy society is etiquette towards others.’
    • ‘Codes and etiquette are no way to deal with issues such as racism, sexism or homophobia.’
    • ‘She is also an ambassador for UNICEF, and has written a series of best-selling books on etiquette for women.’
    • ‘I also collect books on etiquette from this period because they are just so wonderful.’
    • ‘The whole atmosphere is one of propriety and etiquette, under which the sordid matters of power and money bubble.’
    • ‘It is open to boys and girls aged between six and 16 and places as much emphasis on rules and etiquette as it does on playing.’
    • ‘Everyone is all courtesy and etiquette and even the ushers are spectacularly dressed.’
    • ‘He interspersed classes with lessons about the rules and etiquette of the game.’
    • ‘Before you can order at all, you must learn the correct bar-counter etiquette.’
    • ‘The trouble is that the murky area of tipping adheres to no rules or etiquette.’
    • ‘It seems to be the trend to rebel against all forms of tidiness, etiquette and decency.’
    • ‘As a result of this, obeying the rules of e-mail etiquette has become vitally important.’
    • ‘For some reason, these two rules of etiquette seem to be ignored more than any other.’
    • ‘No one knew exactly what they would be tested on so most of the boys had moved swiftly to the library to look up royal etiquette and manners.’
    • ‘Another rule of etiquette is that greetings must precede all forms of social interaction.’
    • ‘The book, emphasising dinner table etiquette and rustic ingenuity remains a best-seller.’
    • ‘Players will be stripped of titles if they haven't followed the rules of etiquette.’
    • ‘Many of the most important rules of etiquette serve to mark differences in social rank.’
    • ‘World War Three unfolding at the dinner table was no reason to forget all rules of basic social etiquette.’
    • ‘My lessons in etiquette failed to explain the correct response so I made my excuses and left as soon as I could.’
    protocol, polite behaviour, good manners, manners, acceptable behaviour, accepted behaviour, proper behaviour, code of behaviour, rules of behaviour, rules of conduct, decorum, form, good form
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century from French étiquette ‘list of ceremonial observances of a court’, also ‘label, etiquette’, from Old French estiquette (see ticket).

Pronunciation

etiquette

/ˈɛtɪkɛt/ /ɛtɪˈkɛt/