Main definitions of fang in English

: fang1fang2Fang3

fang1

Pronunciation /faNG/ /fæŋ/

Translate fang into Spanish

noun

  • 1A large sharp tooth, especially a canine tooth of a dog or wolf.

    ‘the dog was bounding toward him, its fangs bared’
    • ‘I looked under and behind me to see the wolf flash its fangs and sharp teeth at me, giving another howl.’
    • ‘The white dragon took a few bold steps towards him and bared its sharp fangs.’
    • ‘As the wolf drew nearer, fangs bared ready to pounce, I closed my eyes and waited for the wolf to hit…’
    • ‘Gemini shouted a warning as the canine bared its fangs and leaped towards them.’
    • ‘There was no need for me to look up to find every single pair of hungry wolf eyes glaring at me, fangs bared and growling.’
    fang, denticulation
    1. 1.1The tooth of a venomous snake, by which poison is injected.
      ‘the snake buries its fangs in its victim's neck’
      • ‘The snake had dislodged its fangs, slithering after her with sureness of the ground it moved upon, then climbed up a tree.’
      • ‘But before the snake demon's fangs could get in too deep, it collapsed, headless.’
      • ‘No slow toxin drips from the fangs of a jungle snake; already the mouse is being digested before it is even swallowed.’
      • ‘The informant was skilled at what he did and made sure the snake's fangs went in to the same two holes from the needles he had made earlier.’
      • ‘It was the picture of an oval blue stone, a green snake with long fangs wrapped around it.’
      • ‘This particular snake is said to have the largest fangs of all the venomous snakes in the world.’
      • ‘There I find something worse than a gun wound - a brown snake with its fangs in my arm.’
      • ‘You take the brown snake, its fang length is about 2-millimetres, and in one of the patients that we had, the spider actually bit straight through someone's fingernail.’
      • ‘Diengo flinched as the small snake's fang sunk in his skin.’
      • ‘Joey opened it slowly, and out popped a furry snake, baring its fangs.’
      • ‘Poisonous snakes kill with the venom that passes through their fangs, paralyzing their prey.’
      • ‘Typical bites inject up to 600 mg of venom through fangs as long as your thumb, and just 100 mg will kill a man.’
      • ‘They have venom fangs, and a patch on their neck where poison spores can be launched.’
      • ‘Burmese pythons like a meal they can really get their fangs around, especially since the snakes are known to go half a year or more between meals.’
      • ‘The snake tried to hit me by striking its deadly fangs at me.’
      • ‘The snake slithered toward Jessica, bearing its fangs with a hiss.’
      • ‘They have no hidden poison glands, not claws or fangs.’
      • ‘Persistent myths about sea snakes include the mistaken idea that their short fangs cannot bite very effectively.’
      • ‘Occasionally, it would bury its fangs into the neck of its steed, ripping flesh and bone off.’
      • ‘He had noticed that the snake had blood on its fangs when he was retrieving Juu's knife.’
    2. 1.2The biting mouthpart of a spider.
      ‘the spider kills its victims with venomous fangs’
      • ‘I even had to clean behind the dreaded tank-and if you were a spider with big drippy fangs and fuzzy legs, where do you think you would hide?’
      • ‘Venom injected via a spider's fangs acts in various other ways, such as to kill or immobilize prey and to begin the process of digesting its meal.’
      • ‘The spiders have very large fangs and it causes considerable pain when it bites and it'll leave obvious fang marks that will usually bleed at the time.’
      • ‘In true spiders, the chelicerae are modified into fangs with poison glands, while the pedipalps of the males are modified for copulation.’
      • ‘On accosting a prey, tarantulas paralyse it by sinking the fangs and injecting venom.’

Origin

Late Old English (denoting booty or spoils), from Old Norse fang ‘capture, grasp’; compare with vang. A sense ‘trap, snare’ is recorded from the mid 16th century; both this and the original sense survive in Scots. The current sense (also mid 16th century) reflects the same notion of ‘something that catches and holds’.

Main definitions of fang in English

: fang1fang2Fang3

fang2

Pronunciation /faNG/ /fæŋ/

Translate fang into Spanish

verb

informal Australian
  • Drive at high speed.

    • ‘let's fang up to the beach!’

noun

informal Australian
  • A high-speed drive in a car.

Origin

1960s from the name of J. M. Fangio (see Fangio, Juan Manuel).

Main definitions of Fang in English

: fang1fang2Fang3

Fang3

(also Fan)

Pronunciation /faNG/ /fæŋ/

Translate Fang into Spanish

nounFang, Fangs

  • 1A member of a people inhabiting parts of Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Gabon.

    ‘Like most of the Bantu people, the Fangs belong to the Congo racial type of the Black African race, with some Sudanese contributions.’
    • ‘The Fang migrated into their current area from the northeast in recent centuries as small groups or families of nomadic agriculturalists.’
  • 2The Bantu language of the Fang.

    ‘Most people's daily lives are conducted in tribal languages, either Fang, Bubi, or Ibo, all of which are in the Bantu family of languages.’
    • ‘Fang is the major language of three countries on the west coast of Africa. It is spoken in southern Cameroon by about 1½ million people.’

adjective

  • Relating to the Fang or their language.

    ‘The harmonious, balanced contours of reliquary guardian figures convey a sense of tranquility highly valued in both art and life in Fang culture.’
    • ‘While each of the lesser groups has developed dialectic differences, the whole Fang language is basically one.’

Origin

French, probably from Fang Pangwe.

Pronunciation

Fang

/faNG/ /fæŋ/