Definition of fare in English:

fare

noun

  • 1The money paid for a journey on public transport.

    ‘we should go to Seville, but we cannot afford the air fare’
    • ‘Although not illegal, charging double fares by breaking journeys into different segments to maximise profits on one route is downright immoral.’
    • ‘We're all subject to the cost of filling our cars, getting to work and paying the ever-increasing costs of public transport fares.’
    • ‘Public transport fares have doubled during the course of the year.’
    • ‘Prices of basic commodities and public transport fares have gone up as a result of the new fuel policy.’
    • ‘Nationalised public transport provided subsidised fares for commuters and students.’
    • ‘By kindergarten, he was so tall he was paying adult bus fares.’
    • ‘The cheapest bus fare is roughly equivalent to a nurse's weekly wage.’
    • ‘A bitter dispute over taxi fare increases in Rayleigh and Rochford is to be decided by a court.’
    • ‘They demanded that the air carriers provide them with more detailed calculations before they discuss air fare hikes further.’
    • ‘Adult return fare costs £21 and a child return is £10.’
    • ‘In fact, more often than not, the air fare increases as seat availability decreases.’
    • ‘What makes it so difficult to find the lowest air fare?’
    • ‘Most of the transit fare increase will go into the pockets of precisely that wealthy layer.’
    • ‘No wonder he hasn't knocked on my door, he probably can't afford the train fare.’
    • ‘He would give them the cab fare home.’
    • ‘US Airways now offers its discount fare structure on 28 routes out of Washington.’
    • ‘Sale fares to most destinations are not available on Fridays and Sundays.’
    • ‘Rising ticket prices had been blamed on fare dodgers in the past.’
    • ‘Tram bosses clamping down on fare dodgers are now sending 240 to court every week.’
    • ‘The all inclusive fare for the three day trip is £130.’
    ticket price, transport cost, price, cost, charge, fee, payment, toll, tariff, levy
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    1. 1.1A passenger paying to travel in a taxi.
      ‘the taxi driver was anxious to pick up a fare’
      • ‘An investigation by the Manchester Evening News revealed the huge number of bogus taxi drivers picking up fares in the city centre.’
      • ‘The taxi driver picked up a fare at the taxi office on Water Street.’
      • ‘He picked up a fare at the taxi rank outside Marks and Spencer, in High Street, to take the passenger to Harwich Road.’
      • ‘He claimed drivers had been assaulted and abused while trying to pick up fares from the taxi rank.’
      • ‘Some lucky taxi drivers will get fares to the airport.’
      traveller, commuter, voyager, rider, fare payer, fare
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  • 2mass noun A range of food of a particular type.

    ‘traditional Scottish fare’
    • ‘Whether you're looking for seafood, Angus beef, made-to-order pasta or traditional breakfast fare, you won't leave hungry.’
    • ‘Traditional aristocratic fare included such fancy foods, many of which are popular among the newly wealthy classes today.’
    • ‘On offer are generous helpings of bacon, ham and other greasy, fattening fare - all the staples associated with traditional Anglo-American cuisine.’
    • ‘So enjoy fresh garlic and onions with your favorite food fare, as cooking does not destroy the components.’
    • ‘She loves Indian food, enjoys Swiss fare and cooks pasta at home.’
    • ‘Traditional barbecue fare - sausages and burgers - kept energy supplies up and parents busy.’
    • ‘The traditional graduation fare of strawberries and cream was served to all who attended.’
    • ‘Their menu also expanded to include the full range of Caribbean fare, from soup to jerk chicken.’
    • ‘Its business card promises a traditional Mediterranean fare of fresh vegetables, meats, wines and cheeses seasoned with southern Italian style.’
    • ‘The region, she says, boasts a blend of traditional country fare, with steak and beef houses dominating the food scene.’
    • ‘Served with Pondan Potato and garden fresh vegetables, this is the staple fare in the menu for non-vegetarians.’
    • ‘The menu is as you may expect, pretty traditional quality hotel fare, with a reasonable range of meat, seafood and a few vegetarian dishes.’
    • ‘The food is typical Bulgarian fare with the usual emphasis on meat, but with some pleasant surprises for vegetarians.’
    • ‘Sandwiches are common breakfast fare, and coffee is drunk frequently throughout the day and at social events.’
    • ‘And diners looking to eat out or take away can choose from a range of menus, from traditional English fare to Indian or Chinese.’
    • ‘Under the organisation of Kiwi managers, he forfeited traditional French fare to prepare imaginative salads for a backyard barbecue.’
    • ‘You may have to put up with crowds, but these islands have a tradition of food not found elsewhere, with classical French fare and local Creole dishes.’
    • ‘The food was standard hotel fare, failing miserably to live up to the mouth-watering eloquence of the descriptions on the menu.’
    • ‘She is a wonderful cook but my husband would not be happy on a diet of traditional English fare.’
    • ‘We'd gone for dinner, and we'd had what was to become our standard fare of a fantastic range of fresh seafood.’
    food, meals, board, sustenance, nourishment, nutriment, foodstuffs, refreshments, eatables, provisions, daily bread
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    1. 2.1Something offered to the public, typically as a form of entertainment.
      ‘those expecting conventional Hollywood fare will be disappointed’
      • ‘The entertainment fare was peppered with cinematic dance, oriental Thai performances and humorous skits.’
      • ‘It has since expanded beyond that to include women's sports and more entertainment and reality-based fare in its lineup.’
      • ‘It is films and fashion, it is magazine fare and performance art, it is dance and design.’
      • ‘Otherwise it reads like so much of the entertainment fare that passes for news these days.’
      • ‘For kids the movie is a lot of fun and it's smarter than the usual kiddie fare.’
      • ‘We'll let you know how the teams fare this year.’

verb

[no object]
  • 1with adverbial Perform in a specified way in a particular situation or over a particular period.

    ‘the party fared badly in the elections’
    • ‘Account books of the period reveal how traders fared in this unusual situation.’
    • ‘The theories to be discussed do not fare better or worse when restricted to a particular subspecies.’
    • ‘The sound fares better, even though it is only a Dolby Surround track.’
    • ‘Vocal tracks fare better, presenting skittish avant pop with goofy arrangements and nonsense lyrics.’
    • ‘How did he, or his fellow competitors, fare on the food questions?’
    • ‘How did these two fare on our performance tests?’
    • ‘Far-right parties have generally not fared well in recent elections.’
    • ‘Nuclear power plants already built have generally fared well in restructured markets.’
    • ‘Conversely, in times of rising interest rates, cyclical stocks fare poorly.’
    • ‘Stocks fare better over long periods of time than bonds or cash.’
    • ‘But in the long run, stocks have fared best.’
    • ‘And these men will tend to fare worse during recovery than their female counterparts.’
    • ‘The pure farm salmon fared the worst: very few returned to lay eggs.’
    • ‘Police officers fared the worst in a number of aspects, according to the survey.’
    • ‘In this sport, balanced designs tend to fare the best in the arena.’
    • ‘The party lists that fare best will be those with strongest national support.’
    • ‘Compared to the private sector, though, the leaders fare pretty badly.’
    • ‘All the contestants on the show fared dismally, with no-one winning over $16,000.’
    • ‘However, it's useful for gauging how a processor might fare in real-time 3D applications.’
    • ‘We'll also give you exclusive analysis of how each team fared over the weekend.’
    get on, proceed, get along, progress, make out, do, manage, muddle along, muddle through, cope, survive
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    1. 1.1archaic Happen; turn out.
      ‘beware that it fare not with you as with your predecessor’
      • ‘But did it fare any better with Rita, and what needs to be fixed down the road?’
      • ‘Will it fare better than its immediate predecessors?’
      • ‘It fared badly because it ignored the ground reality.’
      turn out, work out, fare, progress, develop, come out
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  • 2archaic with adverbial of direction Travel.

    ‘a knight fares forth’
    • ‘I saw then how it fared forth along lonely paths or alone upon the highway.’
    • ‘Amongst warriors who practiced faring forth, he often fared forth in the form of a wolf.’
    • ‘When Community members had to fare forth into rain or snow, they could don protective outerwear from a common stock.’

Origin

Old English fær, faru ‘travelling, a journey or expedition’, faran‘to travel’, also ‘get on (well or badly’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch varen and German fahren ‘to travel’, Old Norse ferja ‘ferry boat’, also to ford. Sense 1 of the noun stems from an earlier meaning ‘a journey for which a price is paid’. Noun sense 2 was originally used with reference to the quality or quantity of food provided, probably from the idea of faring well or badly.

Pronunciation

fare

/fɛː/