Definition of favor in English:

favor

(British favour)

noun

  • 1Approval, support, or liking for someone or something.

    ‘the legislation is viewed with favor’
    • ‘Those at the CIA with more alarmist views gained favor at the White House, while those who were more skeptical lost it.’
    • ‘Open theism has found some favor with Pentecostals who view it in terms of a spirited give-and-take with God.’
    • ‘When the favor of God breathes upon us, there is none of these things which may not turn out to our happiness.’
    • ‘Even more it was a mark of divine favor, for the gods, it was believed, worked through the daimones, emissaries and conductors of their will.’
    • ‘Catholic and Protestant Newfoundlanders took it as a sign - generally, as a mark of divine favor for the Catholic side.’
    approval, approbation, commendation, esteem, goodwill, kindness, benevolence, friendliness
    1. 1.1Overgenerous preferential treatment.
      ‘they accused you of showing favor to one of the players’
      • ‘Both sides of a trial seek bias in their own favour as, according to the film's ads, some cases ‘are too important to be left to juries’.’
      • ‘His petition to the Scottish parliament accuses government bodies meant to regulate the fish farming industry of being biased in its favour.’
      • ‘This pact is utterly one-sided-in Mexico's favor.’
      • ‘The dynamic this week has been in his favor consistently.’
      • ‘It is really important that judges show no favour and no bias.’
      • ‘The overall balance is likely to continue to shift marginally in China's favour over the next decade.’
      • ‘It is not just unreasonable to be biased in our own favour, it is also naïve.’
      • ‘We certainly hope so - we own it, and are unabashedly biased in its favor.’
      • ‘It is still based upon favour with no relevance whatever to competence or effectiveness.’
      favouritism, bias, partiality, unfair preference, prejudice, partisanship, one-sidedness
    2. 1.2A small gift or souvenir.
      ‘good party favors include stickers, hair barrettes, or crayons’
      • ‘Physicians are often enticed to attend these CME programs with free meals and other favors and gifts.’
      • ‘When you're preparing the baby shower supplies, gifts and favors, the shower theme will practically tell you the best ideas to pick up.’
      • ‘The tricky thing is to draw an appropriate line between a token gift or favor and a more substantial one.’
      present, donation, offering, contribution, handout, presentation, bestowal, largesse, alms, charity, bonus, award, premium, bounty, boon, favour, bequest, legacy, inheritance, settlement, subsidy, grant, endowment, benefaction
    3. 1.3archaic A thing such as a badge or knot of ribbons that is given or worn as a mark of liking or support.
      ribbon, rosette, badge
  • 2An act of kindness beyond what is due or usual.

    ‘I've come to ask you a favor’
    • ‘Of course what they really meant was, ‘Do me a favour.’’
    • ‘Do us a favour: Read this book and listen to this tape.’
    • ‘Do us a favour, get a dictionary and look up what a gradient is.’
    • ‘Do us a favour while you're here: visit my campaign website and sign the petition.’
    • ‘Go on do me a favour, do yourself a favour, take that vinyl out of its sleeve.’
    • ‘Do me a favour and stop pretending you know me, because you don't.’
    • ‘But, do not feel that simply because I gave you a gift, that means that you are obliged to return the favour.’
    • ‘He is unencumbered by owing favours to one master or another in London, and he will measure his success by standards set in Scotland, not Westminster.’
    • ‘The government gave us an important quest to fulfill before our execution, but we will not return the favor of kindness!’
    • ‘Now there is a chance for all those organisations and individuals who have availed of their services down through the years to return the favour.’
    • ‘If you're unable to oblige, then the reason why you can't grant the favour should be very good.’
    • ‘Although people typically disdain thinking about close relationships in exchange terms, partners often do reciprocate favors and kindnesses toward each other.’
    • ‘Feudal ways like offering gifts for favors is widespread and starts early; even parents do it for their kids' teachers.’
    • ‘We mistakenly think we will lose a partner's affection by burdening him or her with our requests for favors or acceptance of gifts.’
    • ‘In this spirit, members emphasize communal sharing, as in sharing food, giving gifts, and doing favors.’
    • ‘Do not offer favors or gifts to families in order to gain access.’
    • ‘Bribery refers to the illicit use of rewards, gifts, or favors to pervert judgment or corrupt the conduct of someone.’
    • ‘Offerings and gifts are made to saints and protective spirits for favors in this life.’
    • ‘You've gotten me tons of gifts and I just wanted to return the favor.’
    • ‘His policy was to buy support by granting favours and wide-ranging concessions.’
    good turn, service, kind act, good deed, act of kindness, kindness, courtesy, indulgence
    1. 2.1one's favorsdated Used with reference to a woman allowing a man to have sexual intercourse with her.
      ‘she had granted her favors to him’
      • ‘The priest borrows the sum from the merchant and hands it to the wife, and the wife grants him her favours.’

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Feel or show approval or preference for.

    ‘slashing public spending is a policy that few politicians favor’
    • ‘It also approved a relaxation of some of the conditions attached to its initial approval and this again favoured the developer.’
    • ‘The demand for UN approval is favoured by sections of the European ruling class and various antiwar groupings.’
    • ‘Most of the people surveyed favor FDA regulation to approve product safety.’
    • ‘If approved, I would favor its widespread use for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection.’
    • ‘Like their counterparts elsewhere in the world, most Taiwanese politicians favor tax cuts to appease their constituencies.’
    • ‘Some politicians favour a graduate tax, which students pay back once they start earning a set amount following completion of their course.’
    • ‘Unlike in the past, it is nearly impossible to be a successful Republican politician if you favor tax increases.’
    • ‘These are the holidays most favoured by its clients in previous years.’
    • ‘This change seems to be favoured by politicians, the media, and the public.’
    • ‘They are also favored by politicians and budget analysts, as well as by some education policy makers, who see them as cheaper than traditional education programs on established campuses.’
    • ‘They include issuing biased research on particular stocks to attract investment banking fees and giving shares in hot IPOs to favored clients.’
    • ‘Lending more to favored clients is on the rise as well.’
    • ‘This solution is favored by politicians and agency heads who can avoid responsibility for fixing today's problems simply by deferring them into the future.’
    • ‘These politicians tend to favor government spending for jobs and social programs in the cities, and have a generally liberal disposition.’
    • ‘Doesn't the church's about-face on the death penalty make threats to politicians who favor it seem facile?’
    • ‘The fact is that conservative voters favor conservative politicians.’
    • ‘Such a coalition makes it easier for politicians to favor both groups.’
    • ‘The banks also have a habit of channelling the initial equity in the direction of a few favoured clients - usually institutional investors, mutual funds and wealthy individuals.’
    • ‘I don't favor the legalization of drugs.’
    • ‘But no, I don't favor decriminalization.’
    preferred, favourite, recommended, chosen, choice, selected, most-liked, ideal, particular, special, pet
    advocate, recommend, advise, subscribe to, approve of, look on with favour, be in favour of, support, back, champion
    1. 1.1Give unfairly preferential treatment to.
      ‘critics argued that the policy favored the private sector’
      • ‘If you believe a club gets favoured treatment from the NRL, name the club?’
      • ‘Nevertheless, it is widely believed that that current laws disproportionately and unfairly favour women.’
      • ‘Critics claim that the Indian government unfairly favors the IITs when education dollars are doled out.’
      • ‘To some, Title IX is a quota law, designed to destroy men's sports by unfairly favoring women.’
      • ‘If he criticised the Kremlin at all, it was on the grounds of what he considered its inconsistent efforts in carrying out policies that favoured the new private owners.’
      • ‘Prosecutors suspect that the bureau has, for example, unlawfully favored the school by approving its establishment of a junior high school.’
      • ‘I started college as the beneficiary of a bias favoring males.’
      show favouritism towards, have a bias towards, treat with partiality, have as a favourite, think more highly of, hold in higher regard
    2. 1.2Work to the advantage of.
      ‘natural selection has favored bats’
      • ‘The contrast is between a random sampling of gametes that leads to the fixation of selectively neutral alleles and natural selection favoring advantageous variations.’
      • ‘In the competitive struggle for existence, creatures possessing advantageous mutations would be favoured, eventually evolving into new species.’
      • ‘The ball blew all over the field and although it did favour the home side in the second half, they couldn't get the equalising goal.’
      • ‘The outcome, whether it favours the defending champions or the eager challengers, guarantees one thing: a Senior hurling title for South Sligo.’
      • ‘The suite of flowers we have now are the ones favoured by the particular amount of rain we had, and the particular time when it came.’
      • ‘The point is that the paymasters intend to reward bloggers who configure web applications in a way that favours the commercial client.’
      • ‘Counsel for the applicant has clearly put the considerations which are said to support a construction which would favour his client.’
      benefit, be to the advantage of, be advantageous to, oblige, help, assist, aid, lend a hand to, advance, abet, succour, serve, be of service to, do someone a favour, meet the needs of
  • 2favor someone with(often used in polite requests) give someone (something that they want)

    ‘please favor me with an answer’
    • ‘She favoured me with what might have been a fond glance, sighed a mega-cat sigh, and went back to sleep.’
    • ‘Marlow favored us with what must seem like an enigmatic smile, but I knew better.’
    • ‘Ariana favored Mae with one of her shark-like smiles.’
    • ‘He favored Serina with the full force of his smile.’
    • ‘He turned away and favored Sally with another broad smile.’
    • ‘Chelsea snapped her mirror shut and favored Dawn with a pseudo-smile.’
    • ‘Leila weighed the question, then favored Nika with that jarring grin.’
    • ‘The aged muzzle dropped a little, and she favored Wendy with a sad smile.’
    • ‘The bike wobbled to a stop as she applied the brakes, and she favored Eric with a wide expectant smile.’
    • ‘Christine's eyes were on him, looking him up and down with the same speculative gaze he'd favored her with, and again he wondered how deep she was with Charles.’
    • ‘Almighty God favoured us with his presence and power.’
    • ‘As one of the girls retrieved her camera, she favored me with a hesitant smile, requested that I sign her program, and told me that she was going to be a coach someday, too.’
    • ‘We would humbly request that - assuming the gods favor us with freedom before it is too late - you would assemble your armies and add their strength to that of our own.’
    oblige, accommodate, gratify, satisfy, humour, indulge, pander to, put oneself out for
  • 3North American dated, informal Resemble (a parent or other relative) in facial features.

    ‘she's pretty, and she favors you’
    • ‘I don't really know him so I was shocked to see how much he favors our grandfather and great-grandfather.’
    • ‘Her very soft southern accent and her facial features favor those of her late father.’
    • ‘He favors my mother and I think I got the best of my dad.’
    resemble, look like, be like, be similar to, bear a resemblance to, remind one of, put one in mind of, take after, have the look of
  • 4Treat (an injured limb) gently, not putting one's full weight on it.

    ‘he favors his sore leg’
    • ‘Nicholas rose with some difficulty, favoring his injured leg, and began to make his way over to Erin just as Mr. Saturn did something by the wall.’
    • ‘Floyd has been favoring the sore foot, which he says is always on his mind and is preventing him from getting the proper balance he needs at the plate.’
    • ‘She appeared to be favoring a sore foot on floor exercise, finishing the event with a simple layout.’
    • ‘Taylor, wearing a restrictive brace on his surgically repaired left knee, appeared unsure and favoring his bad limb.’
    • ‘Bastian staggered to his feet, favoring his left leg as Dakota put her arm around his waist to help him walk.’
    • ‘Fayd climbed to his feet, favoring his numbed leg - which was now starting to regain some feeling - and limped towards the skeletal skyscraper, trying to find his pistol.’
    • ‘The third night of rest found him favoring his left leg strongly, and complaining of saddle sores once more.’
    • ‘Up close, he looked in perfect shape, apart from favouring his left foreleg.’
    • ‘She noticed he favoured his right leg as he got up.’
    • ‘He was walking twisted to one side to favour his painful leg.’
    • ‘After finishing 13th, he left the backstage area favoring his right leg and said, ‘Well, at least I made it.’’
    • ‘I didn't move until I heard slow footsteps and peaked over the top of the gold to see Garren warily approaching the dragon, favoring his left leg.’
    • ‘As she was leaving, I noticed that she'd stopped favoring her leg.’
    • ‘His nose was bloody and he looked like he was favoring his right leg.’
    • ‘Tyrone stood, favoring his right arm, which was remarkably better than he'd remembered.’
    • ‘She limped over to Jeremy, favoring her left leg, her eyes never leaving Rachel's for an instant.’
    • ‘As Mitch walked back to the car, he noticed he was favoring his right leg.’
    • ‘He put them on then slowly slid out the bed, standing with the help of cane, heavily favoring his right leg.’
    • ‘Helping me get my helmet off I noticed he was favoring his right arm and seemed to have a splint or cast on it under his suit.’
    • ‘I pushed myself out of the bed and strode across the room, favoring my right leg.’

Phrases

    do someone a favor
    • Do something for someone as an act of kindness.

      • ‘They act like they're perfect and they're doing you a favour by even talking to you.’
      • ‘He's probably doing you a favor by taking the job on.’
      • ‘We have to win both our games and rely on other teams doing us a favour.’
      • ‘Whereas it is the customer who is doing us a favour by bringing their business to us.’
      • ‘I think the developers might be doing us a favour.’
      • ‘They know that the paying public are doing them a favour by choosing to spend their dollars there.’
      • ‘You could of course say he was doing them a favour, what with royalties and all.’
      • ‘They are actually doing me a favour by striking me off their list.’
      • ‘Adam accepted, although, in retrospect, he rather gave the impression that it was he who was doing me a favour.’
      • ‘Any readers who can suggest suitable reading matter or anything else to keep him amused would be doing me a favour.’
    in favor
    • 1

      (also out of favor)
      Meeting (or not meeting) with approval.

      ‘they were not in favor with the party’
      ‘proper dancing has gone out of favor’
      • ‘Other sites currently out of favour in my head are ones that were firm favourites three or six or twelve months ago.’
      • ‘The latter may not be in favour currently, but he surely doesn't deserve a punishment like that!’
      • ‘That means the representatives of the vast majority of the population are in favour.’
      • ‘Therefore, value investors are on the lookout for companies that are currently out of favour with the market, but may stage a comeback.’
      • ‘But he was unable to reproduce that scintillating form last season and has found himself out of favour for part of the current campaign.’
      • ‘It has gone in and out of favour and it now seems to be back in favour.’
      • ‘Despite the lip service paid to his skill, his work appears to have fallen out of favour with big-screen film-makers in recent years.’
      • ‘Its use as fuel, though, fell out of favour when cheap and plentiful petroleum began flowing into North America.’
      • ‘Dairy produce has been in and out of favour for decades.’
      • ‘Is it a surprise that a player out of favour with his international coach would seek to reinforce his self-belief any way he could?’
    • 2Having or showing approval.

      ‘the appeals court ruled 2-1 in favor of his extradition’
    in one's favor
    • To one's advantage.

      ‘events were moving in his favor’
      • ‘They eventually paid the price but the home side could only add a penalty when the numeric advantage stood in their favour.’
      • ‘This gives us something we can use in our favour, a huge advantage.’
      • ‘I expect a numerical advantage to be in our favour for today's derby, though.’
      • ‘For my part, I quite like spiders, too, as long as the size advantage remains in my favour.’
      • ‘He had all the advantages in his favour, and for what they were offering me it wasn't worth it.’
      • ‘There is also a good freshness about the team as well which hopefully will all work in our favour.’
      • ‘Finally at the fourth attempt the case was heard, the court found in my favour and appropriate compensation was awarded.’
      • ‘The fact that her looks go against the convention seems to work in her favour.’
      • ‘If it turns ugly, your efforts to play fair will weigh heavily in your favor.’
      • ‘Sometimes life isn't fair - but sometimes it's unfair in your favour.’
    in favor of
    • 1To be replaced by.

      ‘he stepped down as leader in favor of his rival’
      • ‘When they fail that task I vote them out in favour of someone who will try harder.’
    • 2To the advantage of.

      ‘the final score was 25-16 in favor of Washington’
      • ‘The union warned of a walkout in the new year if workers vote in favour of strikes.’
      • ‘Members voted overwhelmingly in favour of annual elections in a recent ballot.’
      • ‘Many locals and individual unions have voted in favor of a one-day general strike.’
      • ‘If a majority of members are in favour of strike action, dates for a walkout will be announced.’
      • ‘Eight members of the development control committee voted in favour of the project.’
      • ‘In a ballot held in March last year tenants voted in favour of the transfer.’
      • ‘How can he use this document as justification for voting in favour of the mall?’
      • ‘Those who voted in favour of the closure argue it will help preserve the historic structure.’
      • ‘In the end, no councillor voted in favour of the application and the plans were refused.’
      • ‘It was rumored that certificates were issued to those who were sure to vote in favor of revoking the charter.’

Origin

Middle English (in the noun sense ‘liking, preference’): via Old French from Latin favor, from favere ‘show kindness to’ (related to fovere ‘cherish’).

Pronunciation

favor

/ˈfāvər/ /ˈfeɪvər/