Main definitions of flake in English

: flake1flake2flake3flake4

flake1

Pronunciation /flāk/ /fleɪk/

See synonyms for flake

Translate flake into Spanish

noun

  • 1A small, flat, thin piece of something, typically one that has broken away or been peeled off from a larger piece.

    ‘paint peeling off the walls in unsightly flakes’
    • ‘flakes of pastry’
    • ‘She was tearing fragments off and placing them in her mouth, dusty and moist, her fingers covered in oil from the almond paste, sugar and flakes of croissant pastry.’
    • ‘In this method, clear sticky tape was pressed firmly into sample areas and rapidly pulled away, removing thin flakes of biotite with the tapes.’
    • ‘There were also large flakes of paint peeling off of the buildings, though it was hard to tell when there was no color to the whole place.’
    • ‘We were staring at the garage door with big flakes of white paint peeling off it, but in our minds we were going through the desert.’
    • ‘The white paintwork was peeling off in huge flakes and one of the windows had a long, diagonal crack running across it.’
    • ‘It's available in a flat flake, a powder with an applicator or in pencil form.’
    • ‘The paint coating the frame was peeling and a small flake was ripped off by a breeze and was carried away.’
    • ‘In older homes, paint regularly contains large amounts of lead that can peel off the walls in flakes and chips or fall on floors and windowsills as a toxic dust, especially in poorly maintained housing stock.’
    • ‘This is due to its construction: Recycled plastics are shredded into flakes and heat-pressed into the mold of said desired shape.’
    • ‘The particles in a low earth orbit may be numerous, but mainly they consist of parts that burnt and broke up upon re-entry, and are thus just small particles and flakes.’
    • ‘In gray iron, the graphite is in the form of flakes; these flakes help machining because of the way that they fracture when being machined.’
    • ‘Kyle noted a flat tire caused by the flakes of shield, and looked over at the supply trailer.’
    • ‘Surprisingly light in texture, and the flakes come away in one piece.’
    • ‘The odder thing was that flakes of his skin seemed to be peeling off of his body.’
    • ‘A few flakes of fuschia bark dangle from a spider's web.’
    • ‘I peel a chunk of weathered paint off, and hold the thin papery flake in my palm.’
    • ‘We weren't going to argue, as the big white flakes of fish proved mouthwatering.’
    • ‘Large, juicy flakes of fish are what appeal here.’
    • ‘Season the fish and cook either under an overhead grill, or over the coals until a flake of fish can be pulled easily from the bone.’
    sliver, wafer, shaving, paring, peeling
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A snowflake.
      ‘the snow was coming down in thick flakes’
      • ‘Outside, snow fell: fat flakes adhering to the windows and frosting the glass in translucent white.’
      • ‘And the snow flurries quickly became a constant storm of thick flakes that started to settle deeply on the ground.’
      • ‘A soft haze of thick flakes, sluicing through the streetlights, settling on gutters, bicycles and pedestrians.’
      • ‘I watched the snow fall heavier, the flakes becoming thicker, and knew I should have been cold, but I couldn't feel a thing.’
      • ‘A gust of wind blew the falling snow in a violent manner and then slowed, as the flakes grew bigger, thicker, and fatter.’
      • ‘Outside it was snowing again; fat flakes adhering to the fogged windowpanes like intricate lacework, the clouds looking like lumps of lead against a steel grey background.’
      • ‘As we lounged, slapping grey mud on our faces in a bid to cleanse our pores, if not our livers, it began to snow, the flakes descending into the rising steam as if fighting some ancient primeval battle.’
      • ‘At first, it was the fluffy kind that melts when you catch it on your tongue, but now it's more like heavy fat flakes.’
      • ‘Jennifer looked out over the garden, all covered in a soft blanket of gorgeous white that just grew thicker and thicker with the falling flakes.’
      • ‘From the haze fell snowflakes - first a slow, drifting fall of feathery flakes, then a faster fall that lasted longer, then a hailstorm.’
      • ‘Jamie followed suit, and the two of them started laughing when the sky opened up and the thick, fluffy flakes started floating down on them.’
      • ‘It's not like real big flakes, more like hard rain, but it's really coming down!’
      • ‘It took losing sight of Attila, whom I was walking right beside, for me to notice that the flakes were falling hard, thick, and fast.’
      • ‘It didn't settle though (and they were very small flakes, almost grains), but despite the wind, it wasn't that cold.’
      • ‘She ran and ran, through the falling flakes that kissed and licked at her little body, and as she ran she held her face to the sky and opened her mouth wide to catch the brilliant white on this most holy of nights.’
      • ‘Snow squalls whiten the dulled brick wall across the street, flakes freezing on contact.’
      • ‘It began Tuesday night, big fluffy, surprisingly un-wet flakes.’
      • ‘The snow pattered down around me as I looked up at her, landing in my hair and covering the dull drabness of my dress with fluffy flakes.’
      • ‘It's still coming down in big fluffy flakes, and it's marvelous.’
      • ‘It's snowing like mad right now, huge fluffy flakes pelting down.’
    2. 1.2Archaeology A piece of hard stone chipped off for use as a tool by prehistoric humans.
      as modifier ‘flake tools’
      • ‘Living on the Isle of Wight with a life-long interest in prehistory I have spent many hours field-walking and have a substantial collection of flint tools and flakes.’
      • ‘The flake tools have possible polishing and edge-wear damage evident along one lateral margin.’
      • ‘The artifacts include hundreds of stone tools and flakes, as well as spear foreshafts made of rhinoceros horn and mammoth tusk.’
      • ‘A large number of flint-working sites, producing long, slender flakes used for making tools and weapons, were found during archaeological survey work in the early 1970s.’
      • ‘Very few flakes or flake tools were recovered from this small occupation.’
    3. 1.3Thin pieces of crushed, dried food or bait for fish.
      ‘I decided to use a nice piece of bread flake as hook bait.’
      • ‘When trotting with a pin in fast water, I often use bread flake as my hook bait.’
      • ‘The water certainly was not very deep so I decided to use a small self cocking float with 6 lb line and a piece of bread flake as bait.’
      • ‘Hooks are normally between size 6 and 10 baited with bread flake or crust.’
      • ‘The baits used are lobworms, cheese paste, meat paste, bread flake and crust.’
      • ‘Pinch on a large piece of bread flake (which should completely cover the hook) and cast as close as you dare.’
      • ‘Stalking fish with bread flake, worms and big black slugs is both highly enjoyable and productive.’
      • ‘So I tied up a two-hook rig which had a big hook on the surface carrying a big crust, and a smaller hook 4ins below it carrying a piece of flake that simulated a piece that was sinking from the crust.’
      • ‘All the locals were legering dry crust or flake for the roach but I was determined to float fish.’
      • ‘I catapulted a big bit of bread flake across the river.’
      • ‘A large lump of floating bread flake fished in conjunction with a controller float was the successful method.’
      • ‘Fish were fed on a mixture of commercial flake and live food once per day.’
      • ‘Try a small cage feeder with liquidised bread and a small piece of flake or punch on the hook.’
      • ‘Several roach over that magical 2lb barrier have been banked recently with anglers prepared to sit it out on bread flake being rewarded with the better fish.’
      • ‘Throughout the training and testing period, all fish remaining in the stock tank were fed flake food once daily and bloodworm from a floating feeder twice a week to familiarize them with it.’
      • ‘The humble bread flake is as good as anything more high-tech but cat meat and corn will also score.’
      • ‘Stir in the dried chilli flakes, the length of orange peel and the bay leaves.’
      • ‘It's an entire wall of jars full of exotic looking powders and flakes and you can buy an eighth of a teaspoon if that's all you want.’
      • ‘The Roquefort salad came with many pieces of blue cheese, green salad and flakes of walnuts.’
      • ‘If you're a cereal over-loader, nutritionists at suggest forfeiting half your flakes for a piece of fruit or whole-wheat toast.’
  • 2North American informal A crazy or eccentric person.

    • ‘So, do you now blame your loss on these crazies and flakes?’
    1. 2.1An unreliable person
      • ‘I told my husband she was a flake and she'd never show up’
      • ‘One of the spinning instructors is a total flake: they didn't show up for one of the classes, and the next time I came, they ended the class 10 minutes early.’
      • ‘If the hiring manager the agency is going to work with is a flake.’
      • ‘They believe he's a flake and he's not dedicated to the sport after his no-show.’
      • ‘Dude is a flake—no team should waste their time (or roster spot) on a quitter.’
      • ‘You can't accuse him of being a flake or not making an effort; at least he showed up each Sunday.’
      • ‘The promoter proved to be a flake at a stage when we are already very far into planning details of the logistics of this tour.’
      • ‘What is the best way to let family know that I've been a flake all these years and that I am sorry I didn't let them know that I truly care?’
      • ‘If you change your mind, they will think you're a flake or someone who makes agreements and then breaks them.’
      • ‘Naturally, I am a total flake, so I have to make a very conscientious effort to plan meals and turn up to the gym frequently.’
      • ‘It does no good for a kid to hear 'Your father is a flake', or that he only made one child-support payment.’
      • ‘They sign up and then have to go in order to avoid signaling being a flake.’

verb

  • 1no object Come or fall away from a surface in thin pieces.

    ‘the paint had been flaking off for years’
    • ‘The rusty pink nail polish that I had put on two months ago was flaking off and falling silently on the ground.’
    • ‘The surface of the tree was flaking off in great sheets of bark, showering the two with dust made of both dead tree and stone.’
    • ‘Today, at 108,000 kilometres, there's paint flaking off the leading edge of the hood, the brakes need work and the dashboard makes a buzzing noise at highway speeds when it's cold.’
    • ‘It's only the next morning, in daylight for the first time, that I realise his whole body is red raw sunburnt and flaking off all over.’
    • ‘All the paint was flaking off and some lead work needed doing.’
    • ‘The sight of paint flaking off a historic work of art, literally crumbling off in lumps is a disgrace and will reflect badly on us in years to come.’
    • ‘In most cases, they are kept behind rusty black bars in cement blocks where the drab paint is flaking off.’
    • ‘The door was metal with no handle, and painted with white paint now flaking off.’
    • ‘If you find one at this price with a decent engine, you can count on the interior looking like a dog's bed and the paint will be oxidized or flaking off in sheets.’
    • ‘Examining his arms he found that they were peeling in a very disgusting fashion, large patches of skin flaking off.’
    • ‘And at the detective's feet, a metal bat rested on the floor, dried blood flaking off its end.’
    • ‘The door shut softly, brown paint flaking off behind me, fluttering down to the carpet.’
    • ‘The epidermis has four layers of cells that are constantly flaking off and being renewed.’
    • ‘Thick layers of dust look like curtains on the windows of this bus, and the paint is flaking off the rusted seats.’
    • ‘If you looked hard enough you could see the places where the paint was flaking off.’
    • ‘The years-old paint that covered the thin frame was chipped and flaking off, revealing the bare steel underneath.’
    • ‘My eyesight was also heightened considerably, with the bright, whitewashed walls that had large pieces of plaster flaking off the surface standing out fiercely at me.’
    • ‘This film often contains many small cracks and is flaking off of the face of the wall.’
    • ‘On the right hand side there was a small dressing table, its white paint flaking off, and a large wardrobe, which seemed to take up most of the room, in which to store her clothes.’
    • ‘The white paint on the side was flaking off and the steps leading up inside of it were rusty and they creaked as she was pushed inside.’
    peel off, peel, chip, scale off, blister, come off, come off in layers
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Lose small fragments from the surface.
      • ‘my nails have started to flake at the ends’
      peel off, peel, chip, scale off, blister, come off, come off in layers
      View synonyms
  • 2with object Break or divide (food) into thin pieces.

    ‘flake the fish’
    • ‘Beware of foods such as hash browns, home fries, jam, molasses, soup mixes, canned vegetables, wine and flaked coconut.’
    • ‘I've switched to flaked coconut and it works just as well.’
    • ‘Dissolve 6 tablespoons flaked pickling salt in 1 gallon of lukewarm water.’
    • ‘Fred prefers a version where I use only flaked almonds (no orange, ginger, salt or sesame seeds).’
    • ‘Add prepared fish to the mixing bowl, flaking the fish into small pieces (I find it easiest to do this with my fingers).’
    • ‘One nut biscuit which has developed in a slightly different manner is the florentine, which incorporates flaked almonds, candied peel, and dried fruit, and is coated with chocolate, ‘brushed’ to make wavy lines.’
    • ‘Also, the original just uses flaked almonds on the top.’
    • ‘Baking it helped me use up some things I might not otherwise have used for a while, like raw flaked almonds and condensed milk.’
    • ‘Remove the skin from the fish, then carefully flake the flesh with your fingers.’
    • ‘Leave them for 10 minutes until they have softened, then drain and flake the fish.’
    • ‘Mix and then add the tuna, flaking it up as you go.’
    • ‘One high street shop, Food Emporium Culina, has closed down, so shoppers will have to go elsewhere for their toasted flaked almonds, pine kernels and pistachio nuts.’
    • ‘Sprinkle with flaked almonds and decorate with a few chocolate curls.’
    • ‘Toss it through 400g of pasta and garnish with toasted flaked almonds and Parmesan shavings.’
    • ‘Roll into balls, roll in flour, roll in beaten egg, roll in flaked almonds.’
    1. 2.1no object (of food, especially when well cooked) come apart in thin pieces.
      ‘cook until the fish flakes easily’
      • ‘Place on greased baking sheet and bake at 450F turning once for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden and fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.’
      • ‘The kind where the crust flakes off in sharp little pieces that stick to the roof of our mouth.’
      • ‘Add salmon, skinside down, and cook, covered, 10-12 minutes or until fish flakes easily.’
      • ‘Gently turn over and cook an additional 3-5 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.’
      • ‘After that time, you can take a peek, and check delicately that the fish flesh flakes easily.’
  • 3North American informal no object Fail to keep an appointment or fulfill a commitment, especially with little or no advance notice.

    • ‘a real friend won't ever flake on you’
    • ‘twice, you had plans, and both times you flaked’
    • ‘He started the club after his friends flaked on a number of his planned hiking trips.’
    • ‘He was supposed to spend the night, but at the last minute, he flaked and told her some excuse, and she was over it.’
    • ‘Sometimes the desire to be with people won, and I went to the event. Sometimes the desire to be at ease won, and I flaked.’
    • ‘My friend flaked when she couldn't muster sufficient belief that the social event would be enjoyable.’
    • ‘They were supposed to meet up in person once, but she flaked at the last minute.’
    • ‘Had I known what they planned to do to me there, surely I 'd have flaked altogether.’
    • ‘Later, when my client flaked, Duncan was cool and very polite about it.’
    • ‘She talks about the people who have had to miss appointments because their babysitters flaked or their paychecks didn't clear.’
    • ‘I asked about twelve girls out over a 6-month period, I'd say, and every single one of them flaked on me.’
    • ‘To some, he will unfairly forever be the guy who flaked on Cleveland.’

Phrasal Verbs

    flake out
    • 1North American informal Fail to keep an appointment or fulfill a commitment, especially with little or no advance notice.

      • ‘he flakes out on plans all the time for no good reason’
      • ‘many volunteers flake out after the first meeting’
      • ‘As soon as it rains, my cable service flakes out on me.’
      • ‘I did notice that the Bluetooth connection would occasionally flake out.’
      • ‘The airport's Wi-Fi is flaking out.’
      • ‘With a few keystrokes you can resume downloads that keep flaking out.’
      • ‘My phone is flaking out. When I turn it on, it keeps moving sideways, back and forth.’
      • ‘Whether websites are failing to load or your wireless is flaking out, you may just want to try rebooting your router.’
      • ‘Put the wrong version on your device and, at best, it will just flake out unpredictably. (In the worst case, you might have a brick on your hands .)’
      • ‘Because the guitar's made of Lego, the tuning starts to flake out after a couple of songs.’
      • ‘The computer looks out for environmental features to discern its location, improving accuracy and also acting as a fail-safe should the GPS flake out.’
      • ‘If your hard drive is flaking out, don't despair, a replacement hard drive is less expensive than you think.’
      1. 1.1(of a piece of equipment or machinery) break down or malfunction.
        • ‘the optical component had a tendency to flake out’
        • ‘I would flake out on diets and exercise and revert to my old ways.’
        • ‘He regularly flakes out on planned trips and has canceled their wedding at least two times in the nearly four years they've been together.’
        • ‘For over a month, we kept trying to set up a couples' dinner, but every time we had a plan, they flaked out at the last minute.’
        • ‘You're less likely to flake out on a session in winter if you've committed to it with a friend.’
        • ‘Erin has been casually dating Leah for months and must decide whether to commit or continue flaking out on someone she has real feelings for.’
        • ‘Last week my date had just flaked out on me, and since I was bored, I found myself indulging in the time-honored activity of looking up random things on Wikipedia.’
        • ‘At this point you've witnessed countless incredible women forgive guys for abuse, for cheating, for flaking out, for ghosting, and for just not being there when they needed them most.’
        • ‘Even the members of his party who critique him on social media still flake out and vote with him overwhelmingly instead of using their leverage.’
        • ‘The new trade deal walks back the original commitment the countries made, and makes it easier for members to flake out.’
        • ‘In the past, David has flaked out on the occasion, so she was not expecting too much from her father.’

Origin

Middle English the immediate source is unknown, the senses perhaps deriving from different words; probably of Germanic origin and related to flag and flaw.

Main definitions of flake in English

: flake1flake2flake3flake4

flake2

Pronunciation /flāk/ /fleɪk/

See synonyms for flake

Translate flake into Spanish

noun

  • A rack or shelf for storing or drying food such as fish.

Origin

Middle English (denoting a wicker hurdle): perhaps of Scandinavian origin and related to Old Norse flaki, fleki ‘wicker shield’ and Danish flage ‘hurdle’.

Main definitions of flake in English

: flake1flake2flake3flake4

flake3

Pronunciation /flāk/ /fleɪk/

See synonyms for flake

Translate flake into Spanish

intransitive verb

[no object]informal
  • flake outFall asleep; drop from exhaustion.

    • ‘he got back in time to flake out until morning’
    • ‘But now I have one babe asleep in my arms and the other babe is flaked out on the sofa.’
    • ‘We were totally going for it and I didn't notice that the rest of the band were flaking out.’
    • ‘Usually at 9pm I'm flaking out in front of the tv.’
    • ‘Look at him all flaked out, the poor thing.’
    • ‘She flaked out on the back seat, and we were loath to wake her when we arrived.’
    • ‘Right now she's in bed flaked out.’
    • ‘The last week or so has been such a whirl; I've either been rushing about doing stuff, else I've been flaked out knackered from the rushing!’
    • ‘All flaked out in the garden, we had fun entertaining J (who's two) who is entertainment himself.’
    • ‘I flaked out long before that, and announced my need to go back for a top-up nap.’
    • ‘So we had an early dinner and I flaked out on the sofa.’
    • ‘‘I would just flake out in front of the television at night, but now I've decided to get fit and lose weight,’ she says.’
    • ‘If I'm going to flake out as soon as I get home, then it's probably worth trying to write during my lunch break.’
    • ‘She gave me a quick check over to be sure I wasn't going to flake out on my way home.’
    • ‘Old women in black dresses sit chatting in groups, dogs flake out in the shade.’
    fall asleep, go to sleep, drop off
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century (in the senses ‘become languid’ and (of a garment) ‘fall in folds’): variant of obsolete flack and the verb flag. The current sense dates from the 1940s.

Pronunciation

flake

/flāk/ /fleɪk/

Main definitions of flake in English

: flake1flake2flake3flake4

flake4

(also fake)

Pronunciation /flāk/ /fleɪk/

See synonyms for flake

Translate flake into Spanish

noun

Nautical
  • A single turn of a coiled rope or hawser.

transitive verb

[with object]Nautical
  • 1Lay (a rope) in loose coils in order to prevent it from tangling.

    • ‘a cable had to be flaked out’
    1. 1.1Lay (a sail) down in folds either side of the boom.
      • ‘Going to the mizzen boom he undid the badly fastened ties, raised the sail and lowered it, flaking it neatly as it came down.’

Origin

Early 17th century (as a noun): of unknown origin; compare with German Flechte in the same sense.

Pronunciation

flake

/flāk/ /fleɪk/