Definition of freight in English:

freight

See synonyms for freight

Translate freight into Spanish

noun

  • 1Goods transported in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft.

    • ‘a decline in the amount of freight carried by rail’
    cargo, load, haul, consignment, delivery, shipment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The transport of goods by truck, train, ship, or aircraft.
      • ‘the truck-based system can outperform air freight at distances of up to seven hundred miles’
      transportation, transport, conveyance, freightage, carriage, carrying, portage, haulage, distribution, delivery
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2A charge for transport by freight.
      • ‘a bill indicating that the freight has been paid’
  • 2US A freight train.

    ‘I can hear the regular wail of the twelve o'clock freight from my house’
    • ‘One remained at the wreck to help with the rescue work, but the other fled, only to be hit by a train near Portage when he attempted to hop a freight.’
    • ‘Magnus led him along the darkened wood corridor of the freight, stopping at a door with flickering yellowish light streaming out from beneath it.’
    • ‘A penniless Fred, still in striped pants, tailcoat, and spats, hops a freight for New York, with Pop in tow.’
    • ‘Currently, the freight was crossing the border between Nirvan and Dalach, heading north.’
    • ‘They'll last indefinitely if they're used on the right spot on a freight.’
    • ‘Then an announcement that a freight had broken down and was blocking the approaches.’
  • 3A load or burden.

    • ‘these warm winds deposit their freight of moisture in showers of rain’

Pronunciation

freight

/frāt/ /freɪt/

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Transport (goods) in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft.

    • ‘the metals had been freighted from the city’
    transport, transport in bulk, convey, carry, ship, drive
    View synonyms
  • 2be freighted withBe laden or burdened with.

    • ‘each word was freighted with anger’

Pronunciation

freight

/frāt/ /freɪt/

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘hire of a ship for transporting goods’): from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German vrecht, variant of vracht ‘ship's cargo’. Compare with fraught.