Definition of go up in English:

go up

phrasal verb

  • 1(of a building or other structure) be built.

    ‘housing developments went up’
    • ‘The squatters were evicted a week later but a tent city that went up around the building persists.’
    • ‘Aside from the Norwich Union building, almost every high post-war building that has gone up in York has been a disaster, he points out.’
    • ‘New apartments are going to be built on the north campus as well as two townhouse structures now currently going up next to the gym.’
    • ‘Everything is new and the buildings are still going up.’
    • ‘In contrast, say, to the Museum of Scotland, the new parliament building is going up as fast as a block of jerry-built flats.’
    • ‘With new buildings going up all the time, and old ones coming tumbling down, the town is never the same one year to the next.’
    • ‘If the new building goes up by September 2004, as the college wishes, it will increase the number of pupils from 700 to 765.’
    • ‘The college's plan would see three new buildings go up as part of its expansion in York, as it prepares to shut its Ripon campus in the summer.’
    • ‘Blockades have gone up around the World Bank and IMF buildings.’
    • ‘Scaffolding is set to go up later this month to enable experts to examine the structure and detail the work needed.’
  • 2Explode or suddenly burst into flames.

    ‘two factories went up in flames’
    • ‘It went up in a burst of flame, and only a smoking shell remained when the flames faded.’
    • ‘Then all of a sudden I just saw all of the downstairs go up in flames, and all the windows smashed.’
    • ‘In Edinburgh, the council is already preparing for the worst and has contacted Lothian and Borders police in order to prevent the city going up in flames.’
    • ‘‘Everything I owned in the world was going up in flames and I was crying,’ she said.’
    • ‘Any who were slow to gather their goods could find the roof going up in flames; nothing was to be left that might permit continued human habitation.’
    • ‘Two quick-thinking councillors saved an elderly people's home from going up in flames after yobs set it alight.’
    • ‘Arson attacks continued after sunset, with a nursery school going up in flames in Toulouse.’
    • ‘Luckily the fuel tank was almost empty, saving their home from going up in flames.’
    • ‘If, heaven forbid, his home and studio were to go up in flames, after his beloved wife what would he save?’
    • ‘A fire wall just beyond the clock tower in the centre of the building saved the east wing from going up in flames.’
  • 3British informal Begin one's studies at a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge.

    • ‘Well I think really it began to falter when I went up to Oxford University to study chemistry.’
    • ‘In the 1980s, Coutts was the bank with whom Sloane Rangers opened an account before going up to Oxford or Cambridge.’
    • ‘They continued to correspond on plant matters after going up to university - Fox Talbot to Cambridge and Trevelyan to Oxford.’
    • ‘Born in Oxford she was privately educated before going up to Newnham College, Cambridge, and later Oxford University.’
    • ‘The charity Family Matters York is offering a two-hour budgeting course free for students going up to university this autumn.’
    • ‘I obtained my first cards when I went up to university, then proceeded to spend on them recklessly.’
    • ‘From the time he went up to Cambridge to the end of his life his system of order was strictly maintained.’
    • ‘Big Mike was a clever lad, and went up to Cambridge at the age of 17.’
    • ‘But then young Master Thomas had gone up to Cambridge, and Elsie's black mood had descended.’
    • ‘Lightfoot preached his sermon on women in the same summer Maggie Benson went up to Oxford.’