Definition of hagiographical in English:

hagiographical

Pronunciation /ˌhaɡēəˈɡrafəkəl/ /ˌhāɡēə-/

adjective

See hagiography

  • ‘The trouble with retrospection - especially the kind of hagiographical retrospection that comes with a box set - is that it lends everything added poignancy.’
  • ‘I do not appreciate the hagiographical approach of the media.’
  • ‘The book was authorised, not critical, and its intent was somewhat hagiographical.’
  • ‘Most certainly, the hagiographical tradition did not usually provide stories of women who struggled and made compromises; the lives of the saints revealed only the great holiness that was finally achieved.’
  • ‘Based on her hagiographical work, she has put together a single volume which contains forty biographical sketches of female saints from antiquity to the present.’
  • ‘She wrote works on medical, scientific, and hagiographical subjects, and entered into correspondence with political and spiritual leaders of the day, including emperors and popes.’
  • ‘Central to any such liturgy would be the great hagiographical texts describing the life, death, and miraculous presence of the saint at his tomb.’
  • ‘Part one of the hour-long programme was soft focus and hagiographical, focusing on her limb-loss and subsequent work for landmine charities.’
  • ‘These essays are not necessarily hagiographical.’
  • ‘The story is offered, after all, in a hagiographical setting.’

Pronunciation

hagiographical

/ˌhaɡēəˈɡrafəkəl/ /ˌhāɡēə-/