Definition of have a thin time in English:

have a thin time

phrase

British informal
  • Have an unpleasant period or experience.

    • ‘The men in green have had a thin time of it recently with injuries and absences stretching the squad to its limit.’
    • ‘As elsewhere in the region, racing had a thin time during World War I and took time to recover.’
    • ‘Our orchestras are having a thin time of it, and there is genuine concern as to how many orchestras will exist ten years from now.’
    • ‘So we are having a thin time of it, and we'll have to tighten our belt buckles.’
    • ‘Vegetarians can have a thin time in this beefy country, though Indian and Italian restaurants are some help, and cheese and eggs are always available.’
    • ‘But cheerleaders for pluralism have a thin time of it these days.’
    • ‘The art market is generally having a thin time, but is the same true at the very top end?’
    • ‘As the twentieth century draws to a close, connoisseurs of colonial nostalgia are, unsurprisingly, having a thin time of it.’
    • ‘Many Mexican-Americans in the border states were heavily Indian in ancestry, so Mexicans in the United States had a thin time of it.’
    • ‘Actually the Conservatives had a thin time of it in the 19th century, a time when the electorate was restricted by property and house holding qualifications, the party won few elections and, except at the turn of the century, had few extended periods in office.’