Main definitions of hinder in English

: hinder1hinder2

hinder1

Pronunciation /ˈhindər/ /ˈhɪndər/

See synonyms for hinder

Translate hinder into Spanish

transitive verb

[with object]
  • Create difficulties for (someone or something), resulting in delay or obstruction.

    ‘various family stalemates were hindering communication’
    • ‘With these uses come consequences, and these consequences have created problems and hinder survival of humans.’
    • ‘The man's mass seemed to both hinder his movements and create a more menacing movement at the same time.’
    • ‘Conversely, products that do not lend themselves to such comparisons encounter difficulty because they hinder valuation.’
    • ‘Stay away from iced beverages because they hinder digestion and can create toxins leading to skin breakouts.’
    • ‘It would hinder firms that could create the growth needed to help deliver the Government's public sector promises.’
    • ‘The lack of open communication in the family hindered Marie's ability to ask for help directly.’
    • ‘Fears of potential difficulties and simple uncertainty hinders them from getting stronger.’
    • ‘You need not be apprehensive about delays hindering professional growth!’
    • ‘Difficulties like dyslexia or similar learning difficulties hinder progress because people were using a different part of the brain.’
    • ‘Protesters say this delay will hinder development of the region and is unfair to road users since they pay the same road tax as other citizens.’
    • ‘We are already getting into the next cropping season and any delay will hinder planning as well.’
    • ‘However her dreams, not unlike those of Utzon's, are thwarted by protracted delays hindering the building's creation.’
    • ‘Jacob becomes more and more willing to sacrifice anything - romantic love, family - that hinders his quest to defeat his father.’
    • ‘There do not seem to be too many technical difficulties hindering the rollout of high bandwidth all-optical networks, according to some companies concerned.’
    • ‘Did he have good reason to think his family would hinder his quest after greatness?’
    • ‘No matter what sort of buttonholes your machine creates, there are several ways you can help or hinder the process.’
    • ‘Their lack of communication hinders effective use of technology.’
    • ‘There are a number of difficulties, however, that hinder a fair appraisal of the empirical evidence for symptom substitution.’
    • ‘This may be unfavourable because it may hinder the operation of organizations that create value for students.’
    • ‘Moreover, communication difficulties can hinder immigrant students' interaction with nonimmigrant peers.’
    hamper, be a hindrance to, obstruct, impede, inhibit, retard, balk, thwart, foil, baffle, curb, delay, arrest, interfere with, set back, slow down, hold back, hold up, forestall, stop, halt
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English hindrian ‘injure or damage’, of Germanic origin; related to German hindern, also to behind.

Main definitions of hinder in English

: hinder1hinder2

hinder2

Pronunciation /ˈhīndər/ /ˈhaɪndər/

See synonyms for hinder

Translate hinder into Spanish

adjective

attributive
  • (especially of a bodily part) rear; hind.

    ‘the hinder end of its body’
    • ‘As William told it, ‘He forgot to fit a tail on his hinder parts.’’
    • ‘When the fish is too large to be swallowed entire, the hinder portion will be bitten off and the anterior part allowed to float or sink.’
    • ‘Sir George strode purposefully towards a grand statue of a heroic millipede raised on its hinder legs clutching a large cross in several of its limbs.’
    • ‘When pursued he makes directly for his hole, and even if his hinder parts should be caught hold of, is extricated with great difficulty.’
    • ‘Memory is seated in the hinder cell of the brain, it is the great register to the little world; and its office is to record things either done and past, or to be done.’
    • ‘He stated that the fore part of the brain contained three ventricles, and the hinder part, one.’

Origin

Middle English perhaps from Old English hinderweard ‘backward’, related to behind.