Main definitions of hip in English

: hip1hip2hip3hip4

hip1

Pronunciation /hip/ /hɪp/

See synonyms for hip

Translate hip into Spanish

noun

  • 1A projection of the pelvis and upper thigh bone on each side of the body in human beings and quadrupeds.

    ‘Not only was there damage to my hip, but my pelvis had been fractured as well.’
    • ‘Keeping left leg immobile, use upper hip muscles of right leg to lift leg back up so pelvis and hips are level.’
    • ‘The incision made over the hip is approximately five to eight centimeters long.’
    • ‘You need to stretch the entire body because a tight hip on one side can contribute to a low back problem on the other!’
    • ‘Leave your hand on the wall and turn your body so the right hip and shoulder face the wall.’
    • ‘Make sure that your baby's ears, shoulders and hips are positioned in a straight line.’
    • ‘Don't use your upper body to assist the movement; you should feel it in the upper hip of the bottom leg.’
    • ‘As she turned to walk away from the window her hip caught the edge of the side table, causing the brass vase to clatter to the ground.’
    • ‘Murray ran for the door, hardly even noticing when he rammed his hip against a table edge.’
    • ‘Place a dumbbell to the right of a flat bench, then lie facedown on the bench so torso is at top, hips at the edge.’
    pelvis, hindquarters, haunches, thighs, loins, buttocks, posterior, rear
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1hipsThe circumference of the body at the buttocks.
      ‘a sweater tied around the hips’
      • ‘They have the option of the ‘comfort fit’ jeans, which are cut to hide a generous waistline and ample hips.’
      • ‘The ideal shape has a deep V-neck and is long enough to cover the hips and bottom.’
      • ‘The message that large hips are healthy follows a drive by some high street stores to recognise that big is beautiful.’
      • ‘If you carry most of your fat around your hips and thighs or lower body, you're considered to be pear-shaped.’
      • ‘The third group is composed of patients that have a mild amount of excess in the belly, hips, thighs and buttocks.’
      • ‘If you're a bit heavy and feel that a tapered hem makes your hips or upper thighs look bigger, try a straight leg style instead.’
      • ‘Some women have wide hips.’
      • ‘What exercises shrink your hips? ’
      • ‘It's healthier to carry weight around your hips and bottom than it is around your middle.’
      • ‘I have strong shoulders and narrow hips.’
    2. 1.2A person's hip joint.
      ‘she ran into a fence and dislocated her hip’
      • ‘She was walking a bit funny, as if she'd dislocated her hip and it had healed on its own.’
      • ‘It is now possible to replace almost all the joints of the body, including hips, knees, elbows, shoulders, ankles, and fingers.’
      • ‘As the disease progresses, your shoulders, elbows, hips, jaw and neck can become involved.’
      • ‘The small joints of the hands are affected as well as the weight-bearing joints such as the knees, hips, ankles, feet, and neck.’
      • ‘The main joints of the body - found at the hip, shoulders, elbows, knees, wrists, and ankles - are freely movable.’
  • 2The sharp edge of a roof from the ridge to the eaves where the two sides meet.

    as modifier ‘hip tiles’
    • ‘Did you know that the hip tiles on this roof were arris hip tiles?’
    • ‘Start at the eaves of the hip, with a double layer of shingles, and work your way up to the ridge using the standard 5 inch exposure.’
    • ‘Following the line of the inverted roof hips, they support its outer corners to the east.’
    • ‘With the possible exception of Feature 1 at Vaughn Branch, all appear to have been vertical walled, with hip or gable roofs.’
    • ‘One option is to build a coffered ceiling which will raise the ceiling height and allow you to use the hip side as part of the ceiling.’

Phrases

    on the hip
    archaic
    • At a disadvantage.

    be joined at the hip
    informal
    • (of two people) be inseparable.

      • ‘Referring to their relationship at DubbelJoint, Ms Jones said that ‘someone described Marie and I as joined at the hip creatively’.’
      • ‘Kathleen added: ‘They had a very emotional reunion and have been joined at the hip ever since.’’
      • ‘The Germans and French aren't joined at the hip forever.’
      • ‘However much politics and pop culture have gone together in the past, and that's debatable, they've never been joined at the hip.’
      • ‘Louise and Pamela were the best of friends and joined at the hip.’
      • ‘This symbiotic working relationship ensures that the couple are neither separated for days at a time nor joined at the hip.’
      • ‘Yet ever since the election was called, the first and second lords of the Treasury have been joined at the hip.’
      • ‘It makes one wonder whether the aforementioned Major and Graveney were once joined at the hip.’
      • ‘We are joined at the hip in this business, and one guy can't wave a magic wand.’
      • ‘People rely so much on these accursed contraptions, they have become joined at the hip.’

Origin

Old English hype, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch heup and German Hüfte, also to hop.

Main definitions of hip in English

: hip1hip2hip3hip4

hip2

(also rose hip)

Pronunciation /hip/ /hɪp/

See synonyms for hip

Translate hip into Spanish

noun

  • The fruit of a rose, especially a wild kind.

    ‘the hips and haws in the hedges’
    • ‘Evening primrose, wheat germ, and rose hip seed oils all make fine additives to this mask.’
    • ‘Less well known is rose hip soup, a sweet, cold soup high in vitamin C, traditionally served during the long winter months when fruits are scarce.’
    • ‘You can even make rose hip tea for yourself and your guests!’
    • ‘And like the apple or most any fruit, the hip can be used in several ways by the successful gardener.’
    • ‘Developing rose hips and seeds above the girdling will die.’
    • ‘Then we scramble down the slope to the stony beach, and nibble on wild rose hips.’
    • ‘Rosa rugosa alba has white flowers and huge orange hips, while R rugosa scabrosa has pink flowers and tomato-red hips.’
    • ‘You can avoid caffeine by choosing green teas such as Chinese Gunpowder, and herbal teas with rose hips, chamomile, peppermint and raspberry.’
    • ‘In autumn, the flowers are transformed into small bright orange hips.’
    • ‘After the flowers fade, they produce large orange or red hips that may reach an inch across.’
    • ‘Filled with the energy of a season's growth, hips and berries are certainly the fruit of a plant's labour.’
    • ‘The fall brings bright orange rose hips to decorate the bush.’
    • ‘The hedgerows are rich with fruit, elderberries, blackberries, sloes, hips and damsons.’
    • ‘Crab apples were used as were sloes, rose hips and rowan berries.’
    • ‘The hips of shrub roses make a colorful display, while southern magnolia has large seedpods with glowing red berries.’
    • ‘Allow the dead flowers to form hips, which helps signal the plants that winter's coming.’
    • ‘Permit rose hips to remain on the shrub as food for overwintering birds and color interest in an otherwise dull winter garden.’
    • ‘Lemon juice bleaches the color; try rose hips instead.’
    • ‘And the vitamin C content is among the highest for any plant - fourth after rose hips, hot chili pepper and sweet red pepper.’
    • ‘It is remarkably rich in vitamin C, outdoing even rose hips in this respect and having a twentyfold advantage over oranges, weight for weight.’

Origin

Old English hēope, hīope, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch joop and German Hiefe.

Main definitions of hip in English

: hip1hip2hip3hip4

hip3

Pronunciation /hip/ /hɪp/

See synonyms for hip

Translate hip into Spanish

adjectivehipper, hippest

  • 1informal Following the latest fashion, especially in popular music and clothes.

    • ‘it's becoming hip to be environmentally conscious’
    • ‘People in Manhattan were scouring thrift stores for them; Hush Puppies were turning up in hip fashion shoots.’
    • ‘Our knowing and respecting this truth should lead us to communicate neither in arcane nor in culturally hip fashion.’
    • ‘In celebrity circles, the hip fashion accessory today is a swollen belly.’
    • ‘Mannequins are being given a new look to showcase hip fashion trends.’
    • ‘He had a bit of a mullet, which we preferred calling a ‘fashion mullet,’ because he was a hip guy.’
    • ‘The hip population also makes shopping interesting.’
    • ‘For a lot of teens body piercing is a hip accessory or fashion statement.’
    • ‘It's now home to a pleasing selection of galleries, theatres, clothes stores, some excellent restaurants and hip bars.’
    • ‘Such changes are doubtless inevitable, following the usual arc of once-neglected but now hip neighbourhoods.’
    • ‘Insincere ballads, calls to ‘rock 'n' roll man,’ and songs about that hip young lady just beyond their grasp populate this album.’
    • ‘Yeah, but as I say, I thought the grownups had the hip stuff anyway.’
    • ‘It's the hip thing for college kids to do these days.’
    • ‘And he's proving how hip he can be (at least for those of us who like 80s alternative music).’
    • ‘Still ironing out the kinks, the populist cruise line is sort of a hip ferry: cheap, bare-bones, a bit ugly, and young.’
    • ‘So I'm trolling around all the usual suspect Web sites, asking friends, the whole thing and nobody knows a cute, hip place to stay.’
    • ‘Well, the guy who made trucker hats hip trucks into Chicago.’
    • ‘We felt brave and bracingly hip, bought belts with ‘City of Los Angeles’ tooled into the leather.’
    • ‘Sunburst jewelry makes a hip gift for any chick on your list and, at only $16 a pop, the pins are totally affordable.’
    • ‘Over the past few decades this traditionally Hispanic neighborhood has become an enclave of the city's hip culture.’
    • ‘Even the ultra hip Tibook from Apple suffered from pathetic sound.’
    in fashion, in vogue, voguish, popular, up to date, bang up to date, up to the minute, modern, all the rage, modish, trendsetting
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Understanding; aware.
      • ‘he's trying to show how hip he is to Americana’
      • ‘He's hip to what he calls "the game" the music business has evolved into.’
      • ‘I thought it was some new street slang that I wasn't yet hip to.’

Origin

Early 20th century of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

hip

/hip/ /hɪp/

Main definitions of hip in English

: hip1hip2hip3hip4

hip4

(also hip hip)

Pronunciation /hip/ /hɪp/

See synonyms for hip

Translate hip into Spanish

exclamation

  • Used to introduce a communal cheer.

    ‘hip hip hooray!’
    • ‘Neil was born today, hip-hip hooray!’
    • ‘Hip Hip Hooray! OK, Dad is out of the woods. He was moved on Monday to the "Transitional Care Unit" (rehab floor).’

Origin

Mid 18th century of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

hip

/hip/ /hɪp/