Definition of ignoramus in English:

ignoramus

nounignoramuses

  • An ignorant or stupid person.

    ‘assume that your examiner is an ignoramus and explain everything to him’
    • ‘And the masses - stupid ignoramuses that we are - fell for it.’
    • ‘He is a cretin's cretin, a halfwit, an ignoramus in every respect.’
    • ‘Isn't it a shame that we have these key people doing important things who are either incompetent ignoramuses or dumb as posts?’
    • ‘Only fools or ignoramuses ever trust the word of government officials or politicians.’
    • ‘Sometimes I am such an ignoramus, such a witless dope.’
    • ‘His career brought him in contact with the first men of his time; he preferred the company of rustic ignoramuses.’
    • ‘In fact they are little ignoramuses who leave high school believing that their country has made nothing but mistakes, and they never do learn what revisionist history is a revision of.’
    • ‘After all, Americans are self-centered ignoramuses who ‘love to talk about things they know nothing about,’ as Rick Mercer proclaims.’
    • ‘So in my view abusing them as ‘rednecks’ is grossly offensive, prejudiced and ignorant and those who use such terms just show what ignoramuses they themselves are.’
    • ‘And I'm not making movies for those ignoramuses.’
    • ‘Um, that a work of literature is not to be crushed and censored by ignoramuses whose ability to think has not yet passed the horizon of Pavlovian responses to ritually impure words?’
    • ‘From this it is but a short step to viewing those who oppose liberal ideas or policies as hidebound traditionalists, bigots, or ignoramuses.’
    • ‘What other reason can there possibly be for the number of surly, bad-mannered ignoramuses I stumble across when I'm looking to use, order or buy anything?’
    • ‘The fact that it is too technical for the ignoramuses who run the proportional representation society is hardly a relevant argument.’
    • ‘They are ignoramuses of the highest order and deserve the treatment that will, sooner or later, come to them.’
    • ‘There really is a need for those of us who do know the right things to think to take pity on the ignoramuses who don't and really correct them when they are wrong.’
    • ‘No good teacher approaches his or her students as being ignoramuses just because they don't share the same level of knowledge.’
    • ‘It is a great thing for intellectuals to discuss politics, but we don't want ignoramuses to discuss politics.’
    • ‘I'm not exactly a yoga ignoramus - I used to do some out of a book and off vids when I wasn't pregnant some years ago, so I know a lot of the terms but I still felt very out of place.’
    • ‘‘I went from an antiques ignoramus into a devotee of ancient ceramic ware,’ Cai said.’
    fool, idiot, ass, halfwit, nincompoop, blockhead, buffoon, dunce, dolt, cretin, imbecile, dullard, moron, simpleton, clod
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (as the endorsement made by a grand jury on an indictment considered backed by insufficient evidence to bring before a petty jury): Latin, literally ‘we do not know’ (in legal use ‘we take no notice of it’), from ignorare (see ignore). The modern sense may derive from the name of a character in George Ruggle's Ignoramus (1615), a satirical comedy exposing lawyers' ignorance.

Pronunciation

ignoramus

/ˌɪɡnəˈreɪməs/