Definition of institutionalism in English:

institutionalism

Pronunciation /ˌinstəˈt(y)o͞oSH(ə)n(ə)lˌizəm/ /ˌɪnstəˈt(j)uʃ(ə)n(ə)lˌɪzəm/

noun

See institutional

‘We have no such bricks-and-mortar institutionalism to counter, nor a safe structure within which to slowly develop.’
  • ‘On the other hand, one can consider liberalism or liberal institutionalism as an alternative to realism and neorealism.’
  • ‘One adaptation of an approach that was originally applied to the study of domestic politics that Hix drew upon was new institutionalism.’
  • ‘In the methodological part of the book, Hodgson attempts to develop a response to the challenge that Marx, historicism and institutionalism left with us, and which has been ignored by more recent work in social science.’
  • ‘In emphasizing the ‘rules of the game,’ the new institutionalism underplays the importance of power, position, and prestige in manipulating or ignoring those rules.’

Pronunciation

institutionalism

/ˌinstəˈt(y)o͞oSH(ə)n(ə)lˌizəm/ /ˌɪnstəˈt(j)uʃ(ə)n(ə)lˌɪzəm/