Definition of introjection in English:

introjection

Pronunciation /ˌintrəˈjekSHən/ /ˌɪntrəˈdʒɛkʃən/ /ˌintrōˈjekSHən/ /ˌɪntroʊˈdʒɛkʃən/

noun

Psychoanalysis
  • The unconscious adoption of the ideas or attitudes of others.

    ‘Hesse's introjection of his parents' emotional values’
    • ‘This is essentially the biological cycle of ingestion and elimination, becoming the psychological cycle of introjection and projection.’
    • ‘Identification is a process which may be conscious or unconscious, comprising the processes of introjection, projection and judgement, and through which people are able to find the links of identity and difference amongst themselves.’
    • ‘The exercises enhance introjection of the therapist as a ‘good object’ and the self as ‘good me’.’
    • ‘Such sensibilities are formed, in part, by introjection via previous encounters with screen cultures.’
    • ‘Suppose, further, that these are essential to accounting for the other basic psychoanalytic categories like phantasy, projections, introjections, denial, defense, repression etc.’

Origin

Mid 19th century from intro-‘into’, on the pattern of projection.

Pronunciation

introjection

/ˌintrəˈjekSHən/ /ˌɪntrəˈdʒɛkʃən/ /ˌintrōˈjekSHən/ /ˌɪntroʊˈdʒɛkʃən/