Definition of Johannine in English:

Johannine

Pronunciation /jōˈhanən/ /-īn/ /dʒoʊˈhænən/

adjective

  • Relating to the Apostle St. John the Evangelist, or to the Gospel or epistles of John in the New Testament.

    ‘Finally, we must consider briefly the relationship of John's gospel to the three Johannine letters and the book of Revelation.’
    • ‘This is fair enough, for what survives to us in the Fourth Gospel is the Johannine take on this event.’
    • ‘Like the Pastorals, the Johannine epistles are concerned with questions about valid teaching and right conduct: Christian orthodoxy and orthopraxy.’
    • ‘Those interested in constructions of the Johannine community and literary approaches to the Gospel will benefit from reading her work.’
    • ‘In part 3 John Ashton argues that the Johannine motif of ‘the way’ originates in Jewish wisdom tradition.’
    • ‘Lastly was the Johannine supplement to the Synoptic accounts, written toward the end of the first century.’
    • ‘He looks at the Gospel's theology, language, and relationship of narratives to Jesus' discourses and explores the unique Johannine Passion story.’
    • ‘In Johannine terms, this group can be called ‘household,’ ‘kingdom’ = household, or the place where one ‘worships in spirit and truth.’’
    • ‘When the text has Jesus speak of an hour which ‘is coming, and now is’, transcendent, true worship is placed in the context of Johannine eschatology.’
    • ‘Thus knowing ‘whence’ and ‘whither’ serves to control authentic or elite membership in the Johannine circle by defining that as group sacred space.’
    • ‘Diversity in background notwithstanding, they all choose to identify with the disfranchised characters and ‘unorthodox’ views in the Johannine narrative.’
    • ‘The woman's response in verses 11 and 12 is replete with Johannine double-entendre, irony and misunderstanding.’
    • ‘‘In private,’ then is classified for the Johannine group as un-holy, un-virtuous space.’
    • ‘Correctly, I believe, Chilton sees the Johannine presentation as the flowering of the Hellenistic development of the Eucharist.’
    • ‘Bartlett's Good Friday sermon on a Johannine text demonstrates well how preaching may be shaped by a particular understanding of the good news.’
    • ‘There probably are countless ways for contemporary American Christians to appropriate Johannine theology of the Paraclete.’
    • ‘Investigation of Johannine territoriality next leads us to a native classification of space which is communicated by Jesus himself.’
    • ‘We have authentic Johannine dualisms here which separate two different worlds, two kinds of people, and insiders from outsiders.’
    • ‘Whereas Augustine focuses on the trinitarian nature of God, Denys picks up the Johannine interest in the divine attributes.’
    • ‘The Johannine incarnation Christology rests on this new insight.’

Origin

Mid 19th century from the medieval Latin given name Johannes ‘John’+ -ine.

Pronunciation

Johannine

/jōˈhanən/ /-īn/ /dʒoʊˈhænən/