Definition of joy in English:

joy

Pronunciation /joi/ /dʒɔɪ/

Translate joy into Spanish

noun

  • 1A feeling of great pleasure and happiness.

    ‘tears of joy’
    • ‘the joy of being alive’
    • ‘My head rang with pain but I was alive, and the thought made me want to jump for joy.’
    • ‘I wanted to jump for joy as I followed him out of the parking lot and up to the front of school.’
    • ‘She packed up her flute and left the band room, wanting to run in to a corner and jump for joy.’
    • ‘One part of me wanted to jump for joy, and the other just wanted to run and hide in fear.’
    • ‘I waited until the gate had closed behind me and I was out of sight to do my jump for joy.’
    • ‘Lenita cried happy tears of joy to see him alive and hugged the air out of him.’
    • ‘We are all delighted for Christy who has brought so much joy and happiness to so many people.’
    • ‘The items were just perfect, bringing joy and happiness to every single one of them.’
    • ‘Another year has passed and for some it brought joy and happiness, for others sadness and sorrow.’
    • ‘It's seeing that every situation is an opportunity for joy and happiness, enjoying your work.’
    • ‘She felt her heart pound as she felt joy and happiness for the first time in months.’
    • ‘Joseph seems to spread joy and pleasure wherever he goes and has been an inspiration to many people.’
    • ‘They were tears of joy and gratitude that her gods had not let her down.’
    • ‘Again, last week saw tears of joy and tears of woe as the GCSE results came out.’
    • ‘At St Mary's Convent of Mercy School, pupils shed tears of joy on opening their results.’
    • ‘She cried tears of joy on the podium after becoming the first woman from her country to win an Olympic title.’
    • ‘Firstly, I'm going to take some classes, teaching kids and teenagers about the joy of cooking.’
    • ‘And then I discovered the joy of running through a forest, and was spoilt forever.’
    • ‘Despite his love for Emma and the joy of having a child at last, Nelson was none the less given to bouts of depression.’
    • ‘They are not doing it for the job, they are doing it for the joy, and there's something really moving about that.’
    delight, great pleasure, joyfulness, jubilation, triumph, exultation, rejoicing, happiness, gladness, glee, exhilaration, ebullience, exuberance, elation, euphoria, bliss, ecstasy, transports of delight, rapture, radiance
    pleasure, source of pleasure, delight, treat, thrill
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A thing that causes joy.
      ‘the joys of Manhattan’
      • ‘From her I discovered simple joys like listening for the cuckoo and hearing stories around the fire.’
      • ‘One of the great joys of living in Toronto is the city's constant state of evolution.’
      • ‘In spite of the indoor winter joys of heaters and comfort foods, something needs to be done.’
      • ‘The joys of living with art and sharing the experience are more difficult to articulate.’
      • ‘One of the joys of following English soccer is learning some of its delightful jargon.’
      • ‘A teenager, the youngest in Britain to have triplets, spoke of her delight at getting used to the joys of family life.’
      • ‘I even wrote an essay about the joys of dentistry which was presented to my delighted dentist.’
      • ‘My Mum is amazing, and one of my greatest joys as an adult was realising that she is my best friend and I can tell her anything.’
      • ‘And it was one of the joys of my life to know him and to hear the stories that he told about his brother.’
      • ‘The joys of food and wine are there for everybody - and all you need to bring is your corkscrew and curiosity.’
      • ‘It's not something she's looking forward to, but it's a small price to pay for the joys of motherhood.’
      • ‘Read through this test to see if you're ready for the joys of parenthood.’
      • ‘Surprising family and friends with well-selected gifts is one of the great joys of Christmas.’
      • ‘It has all the joys of country living but with a touch of modern luxury.’
      • ‘He also related some anecdotes on the joys of sailing, drawing on his 60 odd years of sailing.’
      • ‘Charlie and Phil gradually bond with their sons, and start to fully appreciate the priceless joys of fatherhood.’
      • ‘Perhaps as a response my body is preparing for the indoor joys of winter.’
      • ‘One of life's great joys is ploughing your way through a reasonably intelligent, breathless thriller.’
      • ‘I have discovered the joys of younger men, many of whom really appreciate the charms and gentleness of an older lady.’
      • ‘We had both been babbling on about the joys of adventure when a young woman stood up and cut us short.’

intransitive verb

[no object]literary
  • Rejoice.

    ‘I felt shame that I had ever joyed in his discomfiture or pain’
    • ‘It took 52 years for Sri Lanka to do it - when Susanthika mounted the medal ceremony podium on Thursday night to receive her bronze, millions of Sri Lankans around the world joyed in jubilation.’
    be joyful, be happy, be pleased, be glad, be delighted, be elated, be ecstatic, be euphoric, be overjoyed, be as pleased as Punch, be cock-a-hoop, be jubilant, be rapturous, be in raptures, be transported, be beside oneself with joy, be delirious, be thrilled, jump for joy, be on cloud nine, be treading on air, be walking on air, be in seventh heaven, exult, glory, triumph
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English from Old French joie, based on Latin gaudium, from gaudere ‘rejoice’.