Main definitions of lo in English

: lo1LO2

lo1

exclamation

archaic
  • Used to draw attention to an interesting or amazing event.

    ‘and lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them’
    look, see, lo

Phrases

    lo and behold
    archaic
    • Used to present a new scene, situation, or turn of events, often with the suggestion that, though surprising, it could in fact have been predicted.

      ‘you took me out and, lo and behold, I got home to find my house had been ransacked’
      • ‘I did what he suggested and lo and behold, I had the power to beat those road monsters.’
      • ‘And lo and behold, I think he's out of the government now, which is a really good thing.’
      • ‘I was walking through Chelsea last night when, lo and behold, I see a laundromat.’
      • ‘Today though, I decided to call them myself - and lo and behold, they've promised not to send any more stuff to the wrong address.’
      • ‘Then he went into hip hop and, lo and behold, it turned out fine.’
      • ‘Sometimes other people happen to be championing the artist at the same time, and lo and behold, they get national radio play.’
      • ‘So she went and turned the TV on, and lo and behold, there he was on television.’
      • ‘But lo and behold, he finds himself in court and ordered, under the laws of the land, to increase his prices.’
      • ‘And lo and behold, it turns out it was exactly a year ago today.’

Origin

Natural exclamation: first recorded as lā in Old English; reinforced in Middle English by a shortened form of loke ‘look!’, imperative of look.

Pronunciation

lo

/ləʊ/

Main definitions of LO in English

: lo1LO2

LO2

noun

informal
  • A person's young son or daughter (particularly used in online forums)

    ‘my LO doesn't nap during the day’

Origin

Early 21st century abbreviation of little one.