Definition of lock out in English:

lock out

Translate lock out into Spanish

phrasal verb

  • 1lock someone out, lock out someoneKeep someone out of a room or building by locking the door.

    ‘she had locked him out of his own house’
    • ‘‘And you can prevent it by simply turning the key in the door and locking them out,’ he said.’
    • ‘She responded by inviting him to her room and locked him out in the corridor.’
    • ‘And the point is, I'm staring at the door because I am locked out.’
    • ‘So if he locks us out at the front door we can still get in, now go.’
    • ‘The waiter stepped inside and bolted the door, locking us out.’
    • ‘At that moment I had thoughts of telling her it was in Sam and Ashley's room and locking her out.’
    • ‘But he had to stop as she entered her room and locked him out.’
    • ‘For a second, I contemplated messing it up, but thought better since he could easily get to my room and lock me out.’
    • ‘She was already in the car, slamming the door, trying to lock him out.’
    • ‘I've learned, too, that when I lock Thena out, she spends time sticking her legs under the door, which makes really annoying noises… damn cats.’
    1. 1.1Exclude someone from.
      ‘officers combined previously separate contracts into larger deals, locking out the smaller players’
      • ‘graduate students are grumbling about being locked out of the job market’
      • ‘Otherwise, they could be locked out of the US market from December 12.’
      • ‘The French and German governments informed the Turkish opposition parties that if they voted to help the Coalition war effort, Turkey would be locked out of Europe for a generation.’
      • ‘The submission also says landholders south of the border were under-represented, and the New South Wales Government was locked out of contributing to the draft plan.’
      • ‘But she is locked out of social work because when she was at school access to university was restricted to the few - and now retraining would take too much time out of her working life.’
      • ‘But by locking them out of their own party establishments we will also cause them to react violently in order to be heard.’
      • ‘If we want to help poor countries we should allow them to trade with us instead of locking them out of our markets with tariffs, quotas and the like.’
      • ‘Parents saw red over the appointment, organising protest meetings and demanding the departmental rules which locked them out of the decision making process be changed.’
      • ‘You need to be in their face and active, or they will lock you out of the loop.’
      • ‘In particular, they feared that a peace agreement in the south would strengthen the government in Khartoum domestically and internationally and lock them out of the national political process altogether.’
      • ‘They need to prove the quality of this commitment with policies to clean up accountability in government big time, and to let the people into the political process, not lock them out of it.’
      keep out, shut out, refuse entrance to, deny admittance to
    2. 1.2(of an employer) subject employees to a lockout.
      ‘coal miners had been locked out by the mine owners’
      • ‘The strikers occupied factories to prevent employers from locking them out, and these sit-ins became festivals, intended both to reclaim workplaces for the workers and to spread the protests.’
      • ‘But their employer locked them out last year, and they have been campaigning for their jobs ever since.’
      • ‘An employer has to pay his employees wages during a strike and cannot lock them out.’
      • ‘Those to be re-hired were told they would be locked out if they did not sign individual employment contracts.’
      • ‘Eighty workers employed by Brighton Cement Company in Birkenhead near Adelaide were locked out on Monday when they attempted to return to work after a three-week strike over a new enterprise agreement.’
      • ‘Around 600 workers employed at Bendix automotive brake manufacturers in Ballarat were locked out on June 24, after placing work bans for new enterprise agreement.’
      • ‘About 350 workers employed by the Québec bookstore chain Renaud-Bray were locked out on November 21.’
      • ‘Workers employed by leading coating paint manufacturer Mirotone were locked out on February 22.’
      • ‘Bus drivers employed by National Bus in Melbourne were locked out on April 7.’
      • ‘A number of SIPTU workers at the plant claimed that since March 5 they have been locked out by management because they have refused to undertake new working arrangements, which they said were foisted upon them without consultation.’