Definition of madness in English:

madness

Pronunciation /ˈmadnəs/ /ˈmædnəs/

noun

  • 1The state of being mentally ill, especially severely.

    ‘in his madness he destroyed the work of years’
    • ‘In any case, my mental state bordered on madness, and twenty-four hours of Paris sufficed to restore me to my equilibrium.’
    • ‘You teeter on the brink of more serious madness, perhaps as a result of frequent exposure to morbid imagery and bizarre literature.’
    • ‘Dorothy tells us that what is called madness is really immense mental distress, inability to cope.’
    • ‘Some people think fragmentation is unhealthy or it's schizophrenia or madness.’
    • ‘Paranoia mushroomed into madness for Nash and eventually he was diagnosed as schizophrenic.’
    • ‘The link between creativity, brilliance and madness has long fascinated us, but is there any basis to it?’
    • ‘In a sense can one culture's madness be seen as another culture's eccentricity or even quaintness?’
    • ‘The mere fact that I had even considered taking on this analysis already seemed to be a sign of madness.’
    • ‘Psychiatry has provided fertile soil for endless theories about distress and madness.’
    • ‘At times the disturbance was so severe as to bring him to the edge of madness.’
    • ‘Since then, Spector has been a virtual recluse, dogged by rumours of mania and madness.’
    • ‘There's something about this place that breeds great madness and insanity.’
    • ‘Many claim the split was due to Evatt's paranoia, power hunger or just plain madness.’
    • ‘Separating him from society, his highly personal vision ultimately leads him to madness.’
    • ‘The madness of King George III attracted considerable attention and led to calls for more humane forms of treatment.’
    • ‘Something had to occupy him, or the thoughts of Cathryn would lead him to madness.’
    • ‘Reasons for divorce are often infertility, adultery, unreasonable behaviour, and madness.’
    • ‘Weighing over 250 lb, he was on the brink of madness following years of self-abuse.’
    • ‘Anorexia itself seems like mad behaviour, but I don't think it is madness.’
    • ‘What you are talking about is unusual behaviour, not madness.’
    insanity, insaneness, dementia, mental illness, derangement, dementedness, instability, unsoundness of mind, lunacy, distraction, depression, mania, hysteria, frenzy, psychosis, psychopathy, schizophrenia, hydrophobia
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Extremely foolish behavior.
      ‘it is madness to allow children to roam around after dark’
      • ‘I've long since given up on attempting to predict the behavior and madness of crowds.’
      • ‘The duo have been entertaining audiences all over the world for more than a decade with their musical madness and bizarre antics.’
      • ‘To introduce this sentiment into modern society would be madness.’
      • ‘This hilarious night of comedy and madness would also make a perfect Christmas party night.’
      • ‘How do you tell where legitimate protest, in a sensible cause, shades into madness?’
      • ‘I would have pure madness to contend with and no guide-lines for appropriate behavior.’
      • ‘It seems that folly knows no nationality, and ‘the madness of crowds’ is universal.’
      • ‘Given the madness and, some say, the sheer stupidity of the event, the number of fatalities is quite low.’
      • ‘I felt that to enter the wreck below decks at this depth would be madness, even though interesting brass items shone below me in my torchlight.’
      • ‘He wanted to stop this madness, prevent these kids from getting into serious trouble.’
      • ‘Judge Tom O'Donnell said that for Dunne to walk into a bar even with a toy gun was an act of absolute and utter madness.’
      • ‘It was absolute madness, yet at the same time, it seemed like such an irresistible notion.’
      • ‘This is plain and simple madness and the people behind it have real influence.’
      folly, foolishness, stupidity, insanity, lunacy, midsummer madness, foolhardiness, idiocy, imprudence, irrationality, unreasonableness, illogicality, senselessness, nonsense, nonsensicalness, absurdness, absurdity, silliness, inanity, ludicrousness, wildness, preposterousness
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2A state of frenzied or chaotic activity.
      ‘from about midnight to three in the morning it's absolute madness in here’
      • ‘Twenty minutes after the final out, I'm standing on the field in the midst of absolute madness.’
      • ‘He is absolutely correct, there is total madness and mayhem on the roads in Bradford.’
      • ‘So for madness and mayhem, fun and fanfare, chalk it down, it's Hulla-baloo for Waterford.’
      • ‘But for this week the mayhem and madness continues in the toy stores of Sligo.’
      • ‘The funny climax, shot against the picturesque sand dunes of Dubai, is a mix of madness and mayhem.’
      • ‘They will then make their way to the Peoples' Park for maritime madness and mayhem.’
      • ‘My husband leaves a haven of rest and order to come home to mayhem and madness.’
      • ‘The foxy showbiz legend Basil Brush is back for more madness and mayhem and Cavegirl returns with more prehistoric comedy and adventure.’
      • ‘That craziest part about it was that for a moment after she'd said it, he had actually contemplated madness and mayhem.’
      • ‘Then there is New Year, which is mayhem and madness of fireworks, and is not even Thai New Year!’
      • ‘There's lots of women and kids at Napoli, but there's also this atmosphere of chaos and madness too.’
      • ‘How come Jack McConnell greeted all the madness and mayhem of Wednesday's debate on the Licensing Bill with the widest of smiles?’
      • ‘There are many Liverpool fans who will have spent the last week laughing uproariously at the madness of it all.’
      • ‘Chaotic dogfights appeared and disappeared in the madness of the battle, as either attacker or defender was killed.’
      • ‘In all the chaos and madness, his full attention was focused on the road ahead and the path to freedom.’
      • ‘Surveying a nation's press during the four weeks of World Cup-induced madness is an exercise in extremes.’
      • ‘Midsummer madness is upon us as Manchester United are linked with every footballer capable of standing on one foot and swinging the other.’
      • ‘It was meant to be a low-key opportunity to stay with Rob, indulge in a little low-key madness and see a few old friends.’
      • ‘I know I have asked this question before but why is this kind of madness allowed to continue?’
      • ‘Now the twin madnesses of the Marathon and the Boat Race are over I have started going back to the gym for some exercise.’
      bedlam, mayhem, chaos, pandemonium, babel, uproar, turmoil, wild disarray, disorder, hurly-burly
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

madness

/ˈmadnəs/ /ˈmædnəs/