Definition of maul in English:

maul

Pronunciation /môl/ /mɔl/

Translate maul into Spanish

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1(of an animal) wound (a person or animal) by scratching and tearing.

    ‘the herdsmen were mauled by lions’
    • ‘At Babylon there is a famous basalt statue of a man being mauled by a lion.’
    • ‘A mother whose two dogs mauled a young girl today pleaded for them not to be destroyed and claimed: ‘My dogs are not dangerous.’’
    • ‘The patient was mauled by a pet Labrador in June, leaving her with severe facial injuries that her doctors said made it difficult for her to speak and eat.’
    • ‘You see from time to time children being mauled by dogs.’
    • ‘How could I not feel so bad when I had just found out my brother was mauled by two dogs?’
    • ‘We would tell them that an animal has mauled a person at the zoo and they would have to find out from the footprints and animal imprints what kind of animal did it.’
    • ‘Bears shall maul the wicked, and the wolves shall consume them.’
    • ‘The beast just overwhelmed him, just mauled him as he slept.’
    • ‘As the world knows, he was mauled on stage last month by one of his pets.’
    • ‘Trembling slightly, Ian continued to crouch down, doubled-up in an almost foetal position, and waited to be mauled.’
    • ‘A woman has told today how her pet dog's life is hanging in the balance after it was badly mauled by another canine in an unprovoked attack.’
    • ‘Dogs and foxes always go for the neck, but this time whatever attacked the sheep pounced on it from behind, pinning it down and mauling both sides of the back.’
    • ‘Why should he risk being mauled to death if he doesn't need to?’
    • ‘He won't maul intruders, but he won't leave surprises on the carpet either.’
    • ‘Calls have been made for a change in the law on dangerous dogs after a 12-year-old boy was savagely mauled.’
    • ‘They would gang up on a lone rhino and maul it to death.’
    • ‘We had to get rid of her though after she almost mauled the mailman.’
    • ‘Her hands and feet were also badly mauled by stray dogs.’
    • ‘As for personal experience, I was once nearly mauled by a bear while camping.’
    • ‘A fourth person was mauled to death by a crocodile, the paper reported.’
    savage, attack, tear to pieces, lacerate, claw, mutilate, mangle, scratch
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    1. 1.1Treat (someone or something) roughly.
      ‘the body was badly mauled in battle’
      • ‘This was not the first time Darwin had been severely damaged by a cyclone: it was badly mauled in both January 1897 and March 1937.’
      • ‘‘We all had it,’ she says, sitting on a rug in front of her mud hut while her granddaughter mauls a stalk of sugarcane.’
      • ‘More riots are expected as a 30% transport and bread price increase mauls family budgets.’
      • ‘This was a response to another government institution mauling community activities and local concerns.’
      • ‘In best campfire tradition, we tell stories - not ghost stories, but mauling stories.’
      • ‘This comes after the Opposition was mauled yesterday in Question Time when Labor backbenchers were really looking to make budgetary inroads on the equity angle.’
      • ‘So when a little boy mauled his science notebook, scrawled a message on one of the pages, and rushed into the shot, he was severely reprimanded.’
      • ‘Some more chaste readers may blanch at this next revelation, but I maul books: I scribble in margins, bend pages, use inside covers as note-pads.’
      • ‘But the guilt has been creeping up on me, grasping at my skin, gnawing away at my bones, chewing on my heart, mauling my conscience, and spitting out my toenails one by one.’
      • ‘Only days before Custer's loss, Crook's cavalry was mauled near the Rosebud River.’
      • ‘Sometimes I feel like a cat that is being mauled by a small child.’
      • ‘Right when I walked into the gymnasium, I was practically mauled by Rory and Sara.’
      molest, feel, fondle
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2informal Defeat heavily in a game or match.
      • ‘the team were mauled 4-0 by Manchester City’

noun

  • A tool with a heavy head and a handle, used for tasks such as ramming, crushing, and driving wedges; a beetle.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘hammer or wooden club’, also ‘strike with a heavy weapon’): from Old French mail, from Latin malleus ‘hammer’.