Definition of Ménière's disease in English:

Ménière's disease

(also Ménière's syndrome)

Pronunciation /ˌmānˈyerz dəˌzēz/ /ˌmeɪnˈjɛrz dəˌziz/

noun

  • A disease of unknown cause affecting the membranous labyrinth of the ear, causing progressive deafness and attacks of tinnitus and vertigo.

    ‘People with Ménière's disease can have attacks of vertigo that last up to twelve hours, often causing vomiting and leaving them completely exhausted.’
    • ‘People who had had a stroke said that they had confused their symptoms with those of migraine, food poisoning, and Ménière's disease.’
    • ‘Vertigo can also be a symptom of the more serious Ménière's disease.’
    • ‘I have a 70 decibel loss of hearing in my right ear, a result of the, fortunately unilateral, Ménière's syndrome that precipitated my premature retirement three and a half years ago.’
    • ‘Preliminary data in Neuropsychopharmacology suggest that a third of patients with intractable Ménière's disease may actually have very high circulating levels of prolactin.’

Origin

Late 19th century named after Prosper Ménière (1799–1862), French physician.