Main definitions of mere in English

: mere1mere2mere3

mere1

Pronunciation /mir/ /mɪr/

See synonyms for mere

Translate mere into Spanish

adjective

attributive
  • 1That is solely or no more or better than what is specified.

    ‘questions that cannot be answered by mere mortals’
    • ‘it happened a mere decade ago’
    • ‘Our ideas today of discourse and archives must be radically modified and can no longer be defined as Foucault painstakingly tried to describe them a mere two decades ago.’
    • ‘Was it a mere decade ago he was teaching me about history?’
    • ‘A mere decade ago, we were all stupid, docile sheep.’
    • ‘However, just a few decades ago, the mere mention of weight training was taboo in a lot of the popular sports.’
    • ‘A decade ago a mere palm full of gel or mousse used to tame your locks into submission for the weekend.’
    • ‘Sure, I'm stating the obvious, but it wasn't this way a mere year ago, was it?’
    • ‘Unfortunately, this contradicts what the president said a mere three days ago.’
    • ‘Clearly, the whole thing was a mere idea two weeks ago, and already demolition has begun.’
    • ‘The boarding action techniques they were practicing were added to the requests a mere three days ago, in a new strategy devised by Admiral Korbin.’
    • ‘A mere eight years ago, France was brought to its knees by crippling strikes when the government tried to force through pension reforms.’
    • ‘The smile I had mere seconds ago was replaced with a look of uneasiness.’
    • ‘The cause of her current angst came from the collapsing of her younger brother inside their home a mere three days ago.’
    • ‘Rush, mere months ago the sweetest swingman in the country, now looks scared and confused on the court.’
    • ‘She couldn't bring herself to tell Cassie what had happened a mere hour ago.’
    • ‘Never let the parents know, he had warned what seemed like mere glasses ago.’
    • ‘Immediately he recalled the events that had just taken place mere days ago.’
    • ‘They spoke of girls whom a mere day ago were their friends, supposedly best inseparable ones at that.’
    • ‘It somehow reminded her so much of feelings that had only slipped through her fingers mere weeks ago.’
    • ‘It was actually quite funny to him how the bullet weapons had seemed so advanced to him a mere seven moths ago.’
    • ‘He definitely was not drunk now, but mere moments ago, he had seemed to be as drunk as an alcoholic.’
    trifling, meagre, bare, trivial, paltry, basic, scant, scanty, skimpy, minimal, slender
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the merestThe smallest or slightest.
      ‘the merest hint of makeup’
      • ‘He saw her slim frame tense slightly, and the merest hint of a smile, but there was no reply.’
      • ‘No sir, these are nameless ones without the merest hint of date or place.’
      • ‘I want to do that slight nod of the head, the merest hint of a smile and have that: ‘we did it’ glow.’
      • ‘People dived for cover when there was a brief spatter of rain; people brought out the warm coats when there was the merest hint of a sharp nip.’
      • ‘The merest hint of deception or back-sliding was enough to cause loss of face within the community at large.’
      • ‘One would not need to be a Rocket Scientist to figure out that the vultures would be circling at the merest hint of Him becoming available.’
      • ‘The meat needed only the merest hint of persuasion to drop from the bone and was the melt-in-your-mouth lamb you dream of, but rarely encounter.’
      • ‘At the merest hint of food, the chickens, four in all plus Titus, the rooster, swirled around her.’
      • ‘He also had the merest hint of grey to his dark hair.’
      • ‘Lib stared at him blankly, then her face showed the merest hints of a frown.’
      • ‘The light that had taken so long to die out would come back at the merest hint of loved ones or those that had cared for the person.’
      • ‘Perhaps slightly above the norm for fashionable young people, but that's just the effect of the merest hint of urbanisation.’
      • ‘He has made little impact so far; his merest hint that leading the league might induce a little wind was dismissed with contempt.’
      • ‘Most red wine drinkers will appreciate the enjoyable nose aromas of blackfruits with just the merest hint of violets.’
      • ‘It's quite amazing; the merest hint of a parking ticket is enough to start car engines at almost a hundred metres.’
      • ‘Weighty and exceptionally smooth in the mouth with the just the merest hint of liquorice, potatoes and spice.’
      • ‘The best thing about a history so steeped in mediocrity is that the merest hint of progress comes as a pleasant surprise.’
      • ‘It's a statement, not a question, said a little stiffly with the merest hint of hurt.’
      • ‘It is when there is the merest hint of cheating on either side that an activity is undermined.’
      • ‘For this reason, King's determination to keep a tight lid on price rises could see interest rates creep up at the merest hint of rising inflation.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the senses ‘pure’ and ‘sheer, downright’): from Latin merus ‘undiluted’.

Main definitions of mere in English

: mere1mere2mere3

mere2

Pronunciation /mir/ /mɪr/

See synonyms for mere

Translate mere into Spanish

noun

literary British
  • A lake, pond, or arm of the sea.

    ‘the stream widens into a mere where hundreds of geese gather’
    • ‘Hornsea Mere’
    • ‘Cecilia's surname Dela-mere puns ingeniously: over the sea, but also over the mere or lake.’

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch meer ‘lake’ and German Meer ‘sea’, from an Indo-European root shared by Russian more and Latin mare.

Main definitions of mere in English

: mere1mere2mere3

mere3

Pronunciation /ˈmerē/ /ˈmɛri/

See synonyms for mere

Translate mere into Spanish

noun

  • A Maori war club, especially one made of greenstone.

Origin

Maori.

Pronunciation

mere

/ˈmerē/ /ˈmɛri/