Definition of mile in English:

mile

Pronunciation /mīl/ /maɪl/

noun

  • 1

    (also statute mile)
    A unit of linear measure equal to 1,760 yards (approximately 1.609 kilometres).

    1. 1.1A race extending over a mile.
      ‘he rode the fastest mile of his entire career in 1914’
    2. 1.2historical A Roman measure of 1,000 paces (approximately 1,620 yards).
  • 2usually milesinformal A very long way or a very great amount.

    ‘vistas which stretch for miles’
    ‘this is my favourite film by a mile’
    a large amount, a fair amount, a good deal, a great deal, a deal, a great quantity, quantities, an abundance, a wealth, a profusion, plenty, masses

adverb

informal
  • milesas submodifier By a great amount or a long way.

    ‘the second tape is miles better’
    • ‘He hasn't looked happy so far in the championship at centre half-back and was miles off the pace in the frenetic first twenty minutes.’
    preoccupied, diverted, inattentive, vague, absorbed, engrossed, abstracted, distrait, distant, absent, absent-minded, faraway

Phrases

    be miles away
    informal
    • Be lost in thought and consequently unaware of what is happening around one.

      ‘I was thinking about something else - I was miles away’
      • ‘Part of your mind was focussing on the road, but you were miles away.’
      • ‘I could stare straight ahead but be miles away in seconds.’
    a mile a minute
    informal
    • Very quickly.

      ‘he talks a mile a minute’
      • ‘She reappeared just as quickly, talking a mile a minute.’
      • ‘And we've got to wonder, if you're able to talk a mile a minute on the ground, how do you calculate the speed of speech at cruising altitude?’
      • ‘Apparently, he pulled the ‘nicknames’ out of his head a mile a minute.’
      • ‘Thousands of emotions were rushing through my body a mile a minute.’
      • ‘From his home in Prince Edward Island, words spill out at a mile a minute as he describes his life as a fiddler and stepdancer.’
      • ‘Right now, he's shooting his mouth off a mile a minute on his mobile.’
      • ‘Within minutes, Scott had Ellie talking a mile a minute about everything she could think of.’
      • ‘The admiral stared at the blank screen for a few more minutes, his mind whirling a mile a minute.’
      • ‘Anna was breathing fast, and her heart was racing a mile a minute.’
      • ‘He appears in many of the films just as he is in person - talking a mile a minute from behind thick glasses, his tongue working overtime to keep up with the rapid-fire messages from his brain.’
    run a mile
    informal
    • Used with reference to a situation regarded as frightening or alarming.

      ‘if someone proposed to me I'd probably run a mile’
    go the extra mile
    • Be especially assiduous in one's attempt to achieve something.

      ‘state regulators will go the extra mile to ensure that this settlement is as investor-friendly as possible’
      • ‘Our ideal candidate will also be a determined achiever, that is, a person who goes the extra mile to achieve personal goals.’
      • ‘Providers need to be well trained and academically affiliated providers who can expend the time and effort to go the extra mile for their patients.’
      • ‘Professionalism for the rest of us means being willing to go the extra mile and work the extra hours.’
      • ‘It is worth going that extra mile when you know they've gone the extra mile to accommodate you.’
      • ‘More companies should take the extra steps, go the extra mile to show some pride in their product and support the people who paid good money to buy their game.’
      • ‘Now is an ideal time to go the extra mile with extra service or courtesy.’
      • ‘The Lifetime Achievement Award is for a person who has gone the extra mile in the course of their paid duties or voluntary work and has demonstrated a lifelong dedication.’
      • ‘When you go the extra mile for your students, they are more likely to go the extra mile for you.’
      • ‘The private hospitality outlets generally did not have this approach, but went the extra mile to ensure good value - and those are the places where we stayed longer and spent more money.’
      • ‘Carol went the extra mile with this and her diligence has led directly to the discovery of nearly half a million contraband cigarettes.’
    miles from anywhere
    informal
    • In a very isolated place.

      ‘it can be lonely, living miles from anywhere’
      • ‘The fortuitous setting of the Bilderberg Jan Luyken means that it overcomes the usual annoying paradox of hotels in major cities: the ones close to everything are too noisy, and the ones quiet enough to permit sleep are miles from anywhere.’
      • ‘Hundreds and hundreds of miles from anywhere, the spot was the very ‘climax of desolation,’ as one of Stuart's fellow explorers once put it, and Stuart and his men had gone through hell to get there.’
      • ‘Nobody thought York was a possibility, because it's miles from anywhere.’
      • ‘They were miles from anywhere and mum couldn't get a signal on her mobile phone, so she had to walk quite a way to get help.’
      • ‘When I worked for Bright Star they had their store in an old military bomb store miles from anywhere.’
      • ‘Breezily, reassuringly, I said ‘Oh well, it's not like we're miles from anywhere.’’
      • ‘I couldn't go for a walk because the house was miles from anywhere and it was surrounded by plains.’
      • ‘You'll feel a million miles from anywhere, especially at night, yet you're only a 15-minute cab ride from town (and there's a free minibus).’
      • ‘A million miles from anywhere, it is America's most far-flung state but its isolated beauty is a huge attraction for adventures and honeymooners.’
      • ‘There was one large house, and eight smaller ones, miles from anywhere else.’
    see something a mile off
    informal
    • Recognize something very easily.

      ‘you can see a mile off these people are celebrity wannabes hoping this show is their big break’
      ‘the first-year campers can be spotted a mile off’
      • ‘The ‘scary’ bits are so clichéd they can be seen a mile off.’
      • ‘You can spot them a mile off - crew cuts, their best going-to-court suit and a black rubbish bag full of their stuff.’
      • ‘Thing is, there are still a lot that don't know how to carry this off successfully and you're going to be able to spot them a mile off.’
      • ‘You spot them a mile off and they were packing the boat this morning to town.’
      • ‘Viewers have become so adept at decoding adverts that your average post-modern couch potato can spot a marketing strategy a mile off.’
      • ‘‘We really were sure that we'd spot the secret shopper a mile off but we really, honestly didn't ’, she says.’
      • ‘Book lovers can spot a heavyweight writer a mile off.’
      • ‘If you put grass cuttings in your bin they spot it a mile off.’
      • ‘I don't quite know what it is, but I can still spot it a mile off.’
      • ‘It is occasionally a little corny dramatically and the plot twists can be seen a mile off but technically the film works.’
    stand out a mile
    British informal
    • Be very obvious or incongruous.

      ‘his skill stood out a mile’
      • ‘For a team on a bit of roll like Aberdeen (three wins and a draw in their last four games) their odds stuck out a mile.’
      • ‘I stood out a mile, a huge, rustling, fluorescent yellow blob on the green landscape of life.’
      • ‘Like, you know, when someone on a soap opera goes undercover, they wear a hat and yet they're the only one wearing a hat so they stick out a mile.’
      • ‘It's worrying that mistakes that would stand out a mile to patients are being taken as gospel for all sorts of decisions made by healthcare staff, insurers and solicitors.’
      • ‘And any review must surely consider whether Salesbury Hall should host the show again - when the problems of getting large numbers of people to and from that location stand out a mile.’
      • ‘They stand out a mile, and their final act of defiance is appallingly preposterous and embarrassing.’
      • ‘It stood out a mile against the milky-white skin.’
      • ‘As it was, he was also wearing his travelling gear, painfully bright clothing that stood out a mile against his dark skin.’
      • ‘But the two nuns stood out a mile - both were dressed in their habits and both were tall, strong looking women.’
      • ‘His performance stands out a mile and there isn't enough of him.’

Origin

Old English mīl, based on Latin mil(l)ia, plural of mille ‘thousand’ (the original Roman unit of distance was mille passus ‘a thousand paces’).

Pronunciation

mile

/mīl/ /maɪl/