Definition of minyan in English:

minyan

Pronunciation /ˈminyən/ /ˈmɪnjən/

nounminyanim

  • 1A quorum of ten men (or in some synagogues, men and women) over the age of 13 required for traditional Jewish public worship.

    ‘The minimum number required for Jewish worship, a minyan, is ten.’
    • ‘The Kaddish is to be recited only in the presence of a duly constituted quorum, a minyan, which consists of ten males above the age of Bar Mitzvah.’
    • ‘Therefore, the regular Orders of Service should be recited, if possible, with a minyan of participants, defined in tradition as ten or more male Jews of the age of 13 or over.’
    • ‘In Mark's grandfather's apartment building, filled as it is with old Jewish residents, a minyan is not easy to come by: too many people are sick or atheists.’
    • ‘The Conservative and Reconstructionist movements allow women in a minyan; the Reform movement does not require a minyan.’
    • ‘He said that when he committed himself to three things - praying everyday with a minyan, daily Torah learning and outreach to fellow Jews - his success at work skyrocketed.’
    • ‘I am a heathen but will help make up a minyan if required, and said kaddish for my mother when she died.’
    • ‘I couldn't believe that the year was almost over and of all things - being on the way to Israel to visit my widowed mother - I wasn't going to be able to find a minyan to say Kaddish.’
    • ‘It has been increasingly difficult for the synagogues to attain a minyan - the 10 men required to conduct a service.’
    • ‘During the shiva, the rabbi visited or called every day and the daily minyan came to our home.’
    • ‘When praying without a minyan, begin with the following three-word formula.’
    • ‘I now have another reason to pray with a minyan each day.’
    • ‘Yet he vowed to stay in Berlin so long as even a minyan was left, kept his vow, hence was deported to the Nazi Musterlager, Theresienstadt.’
    • ‘In 1267, he arrived in Jerusalem, where there were so few Jews at the time that he could not find ten men for a minyan in order to pray.’
    • ‘While traveling, I was forced to have to pray on my own, and without a minyan.’
    • ‘The only time he really got suddenly interested in reading something was when his mother died, and he tried to get a minyan together to read Kaddish for her.’
    • ‘Even in Israel, you'd be hard-pressed to find a minyan of people still composing and performing original music in Yiddish.’
    • ‘My rabbi has a hard time getting a minyan together on Saturdays.’
    • ‘I always find it inspiring to see minyanim gathering in airplanes and airport terminals.’
    1. 1.1A meeting of Jewish people for public worship.
      ‘Even the simplest routines are hard to return to after shiva, such as attending the first minyan in shul or the first P.T.A. meeting at a child's school etc.’
      • ‘He joined a morning minyan and started putting on tefillin.’
      • ‘The hospital's synagogue is on the same floor as Plastic Surgery, only a few steps from the department, and the boys have already been making an effort to attend minyanim.’
      • ‘I told them all not to worry, and ‘Hey, it's a good thing maybe now I can get to morning minyan.’’
      • ‘Finally, after years of ignoring this yearning deep inside, I made the decision that just for one day I would do the right thing and make it to minyan.’

Origin

Mid 18th century from Hebrew minyān, literally ‘reckoning’.